(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Maryland Statistical Abstract"

^^™^^*W<!«W» 



Maryland 

HA 

421 

1970 
.FOLIO 



NOTE TO THE READER 

The paper in this volume is brittle or the 
inner margins are extremely narrow. 

We have bound or rebound the volume 
utilizing the best means possible. 

PLEASE HANDLE WITH CARE 



General Bookbinding Co.. Chesterland, Ohio 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/marylandstatisti1970mary 



par dfai 
M/l 

Hal 
mo 



AS THE SOUTHERN ANCHOR OF THE NORTHEASTERN 



MEGALOPOLIS REACHING FROM BOSTON TO WASHINGTON, D. C, 



MARYLAND HAS EMERGED AS A DYNAMIC ECONOMIC AREA. 



FAVORABLY SITUATED IN THE MIDST OF A VAST CONSUMER 



MARKET, RAW MATERIALS AND AN EXTENSIVE AIR, LAND AND 



WATER TRANSPORTATION NETWORK, MARYLAND IS IDEALLY 



LOCATED FOR MANUFACTURING, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, 



DISTRIBUTION, RECREATION AND TOURISM. 



ROOM 






PRICE -$3.00 



DO NOT CIRCUIT 



WILLIAM A PATE ^_ / £^ ^ TELEPHONE COLONIAL 8 3371 

direcioh 




STATE OF MARYLAND 
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

state office building 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

June 30, 1970 

The Honorable Marvin Mandel 
Governor of Maryland 
The State House 
Annapolis, Maryland 21401 

Dear Governor Mandel: 

It is with great pleasure that we transmit to you this report, 
"Maryland Statistical Abstract." 

This is one in a series of reports which presents a statistical 
record of the composition, changes and trends in the population, business, 
agriculture, natural resources and many other aspects of life in Maryland. 
This report deals in facts and figures, but the ultimate concern is with 
the well-being of the human resources of the State — Maryland's men, 
women and children. 

It is hoped that these data will be informative and useful to 
individuals, business firms, and state and local governmental agencies 
in Maryland and elsewhere, and that they will provide the basic informa- 
tion necessary to sound decisions on many matters vital to the welfare 
of Maryland's citizens. 

This report is part of the Department's over-all program to bring 
together in this Department the many types of information on Maryland's 
economic resources necessary for effective long-range planning and to 
assist residents and potential investors in Maryland's economic oppor- 
tunities. Supplementing this series of reports are periodic reports which 
discuss and analyze a specific and particular aspect of the Maryland 
economy as well as monthly reports dealing with Maryland economic indicators, 

Every care has been exercised to ensure the usefulness and accuracy 
of this publication. We welcome suggestions which will improve the utility 
of future editions and would appreciate having them brought to our attention, 

Sincerely, 



2ukjj^(^Q^^^ 



Ralph O. Dulany //^William A^Pate 

Chairman ^ Director 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
COUNTY-TOWN MAP OF MARYLAND 1 

Table No. 

1 Geographical Regions of Maryland Grouped By Political 
Subdivisions 2 

POPULATION AND VITAL STATISTICS 3 

2 Population, State of Maryland and Political Subdivisions, 

Rank by 1969: 1969 and 1960 5 

3 Population of the 50 States and the District of Columbia, 

Rank by Per Cent of Change: 1960/1968 6 

4 Population Density of Maryland and Political Subdivisions; 
1969 and 1960 8 

5 Population Density of Maryland Subdivisions, Ranked By 

Land Area: January 1970 9 

6 Maryland Population Growth: 1860-1969 10 

7 Population of Selected Maryland Towns, Cities, and Areas: 

1968 and 1960 11 

8 Population, State of Maryland, By Race and Political 
Subdivision: July 1, 1968 and April 1, 1960 12 

9 Estimated Maryland Population by Race and Age Group: 

July 1, 1968 13 

10 Comparative Population Estimates and Vital Statistics 

Data, By Race for Maryland Regions: 1968 14 

11 Estimated Maryland White Population, By Age Group and 
Political Subdivision: July 1, 1968 15 

12 Estimated Maryland Nonwhite Population, By Age Group and 
Political Subdivision: July 1, 1968 16 

13 Marriage By Resident Status and Type of Ceremony, By 
Political Subdivision of Occurrence 17 



Page 



Table No. 



14 Births and Birth Rates By Race for Maryland and 

Political Subdivisions: 1968 18 

15 Absolute Divorce and Annulments By Legal Grounds for 

Decree and Political Subdivisions of Occurrence: 1968. . 19 

16 Selected Mortality Data By Race, Maryland and the United 
States: 1966-1968 20 

17 Deaths By Twenty Leading Causes, Sex and Race, Maryland: 

1968 21 

18 Deaths and Death Rates By Race for Maryland and Political 
Subdivisions: 1968 22 

STATE HOSPITALS FOR THE MENTALLY ILL 23 

19 Patient Population, State Hospitals for the Mentally 111: 
Fiscal Years 1969, 1967, 1963, 1959 24 

EDUCATION 25 

20 Number of Public Schools in Maryland, By Political 
Subdivisions: Fall 1969 26 

21 Enrollment in Public and Nonpublic Schools, Maryland: 

1967, 1966, 1962 27 

22 Number of Pupils Attending Public Schools in Maryland, By 
Political Subdivision: 1967, 1966, 1962 28 

23 Average Number of Pupils Belonging Per Teacher and 
Principal, Maryland Public Schools, By Political Subdivi- 
sion: 1968-1969 School Year 29 

24 All Elementary and High School Teachers and Principals in 
Maryland Public Schools, By Political Subdivision: Fall 

1967, Fall 1964 30 

25 Cost Per Pupil Belonging, Current Expenses, Maryland 
Public Day School, By Political Subdivision: 1967-1968 

School Year 31 

26 Average Salary Per Teacher and Principal, Maryland Public 
Schools; By Political Subdivision: 1968-1969 School Year 32 

27 Source of Current Funds and Disbursements, Maryland 

Public Schools: School Year 1967-1968 33 



li 



Page 



Table No, 



28 Capital Outlay Expenditures, Maryland Public Schools 
and Community Colleges, By Political Subdivision: 

1968-1969 School Year 34 

29 Public High School Graduates in Maryland and Per Cent 
Continuing Education, By Political Subdivision: 1966, 

1965, 1960 35 

30 Enrollment in State-Accredited Four Year Colleges and 
Universities: October 1968 36 

31 Four Year State-Accredited Colleges and Universities in 
Maryland: 1968 38 

32 Enrollment in State-Accredited Two Year Colleges: 

October 1968 40 

COURTS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 41 

33 Number of Judges, Population, and Case Load by Judge, 
Maryland Trial Courts, By Political Subdivision: July 

1968 43 

34 Cases Filed in Trial Courts, Maryland: 1968, 1967. ... 44 

35 Average Time Intervals, Dispositions of Appeals, Maryland 
Court of Appeals, In Months: 1958-1967 45 

36 Average Time Lapse, Criminal Cases, State of Maryland, 

In Months: 1963-1968 46 

37 Disposition of Juvenile Court Cases, By Political 
Subdivision: Fiscal Year 1969 47 

38 United States District Court for Maryland, Bankruptcy, 
Administrative, and Citizenship Matters: July 1, 1967- 

June 30, 1968 48 

39 United States District Court for Maryland, Civil and 

Criminal Cases: July 1, 1967-June 30, 1968 48 

40 Jurisdictions From Vhich Committed Persons Were Received: 
Fiscal Year 1967 49 

41 Age Groups of Committed Persons, All Adult Institutions: 
Fiscal Year 1967 50 



in 



Page 



Table No. 



42 Lengths of Sentences of Committed Persons, All Adult 
Institutions: Fiscal Year 1967 50 

43 Average Daily Population of Juvenile Institutions: June 

1969 and June 1968 51 

44 Adult Correctional Institutional Population: Fiscal 

Year 1967 51 

CLIMATE OF MARYLAND 52 

45 Location of Maryland Weather Stations For Which 
Climatological Data are Presented 54 

46 Spring and Fall Freeze Data Based on Thirty Year Period, 
1931-1960, and Average Length of Freeze Free Periods. . . 56 

47 Average Temperature, Precipitation, and Snowfall at 
Selected Locations Within the State of Maryland: 1931- 

1960 Unless Otherwise Noted 58 

NATURAL RESOURCES 69 

48 Commercial Forest Land Area By Stand-Size Class in 
Maryland and Neighboring States and the Continental 

United States: 1963 71 

49 Forest Land Area in Maryland and Neighboring States and 

the Continental United States: 1963 71 

50 Commercial Forest Land Ownership By Type of Owner in 
Maryland and Neighboring States and the Continental 

United States: 1963 72 

51 Net Volume of Growing Stock and Sawtimber on Commercial 
Forest Land By Ownership and Net Annual Growth in Maryland 
and Neighboring States and the Continental United States: 

1963 and 1962 73 

52 Net Volume of Live Sawtimber in Sawtimber Stands on 
Commercial Forest Land in Maryland and Neighboring States 

and the Continental United States ■» 74 

53 Net Volume of Live Sawtimber and Growing Stock on 
Commercial Forest Lands in Maryland, By Species Group: 
January 1, 1963 74 



IV 



Page 



Table No, 



54 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Growing Stock on 
Commercial Forest Land, Maryland, By Species Group: 

1963 75 

55 Annual Cut and Net Annual Growth of Live Sawtimber on 
Commercial Forest Land, Maryland, By Species Group: 1963 75 

56 Estimated Commercial Timber Cut: 1964 76 

57 Number of Forest Fires and Area Burned in Maryland, By 
Political Subdivision: Fiscal Year 1967 and 1960 .... 77 

58 Forest Fires in Maryland By Cause, By Political 
Subdivision: Fiscal Year 1967 78 

59 Number of Commercial Fishermen and Gear in Maryland: 

1966, 1960, 1955, 1950 79 

60 Fish Catch in Maryland, By Quantity: 1968 and 1967 ... 80 

61 Fish Catch in Maryland, By Value: 1968 and 1967 82 

62 Seafood Processed Products, Maryland: 1966-1968 84 

63 Hunting and Fishing License Sales, Maryland: Fiscal 

Years 1965-1969 85 

64 Mineral Production in Maryland: 1966-1968 86 

65 Value of Mineral Production in Maryland, By Political 
Subdivision: 1966-1968 87 

LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT, AND UNEMPLOYMENT 88 

66 Civilian Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment in 
Maryland: 1968 and 1960 89 

67 Work Force, Employment and Unemployment By Counties and 

Areas: 1968 Averages 90 

68 Percentage Distribution of Employment in Maryland: 1968 

and 1960 92 

69 Non-Manufacturing Employment In Maryland, Annual 

Averages: 1968 and 1960 93 



Page 



Table No. 



70 Non-Manufacturing Employment In Maryland, Rank By Per 

Cent of Total: 1968 94 

71 Non-Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, Rank By Per 

Cent Change: 1968 and 1960 95 

72 Distribution of Maryland State Employees, By Political 
Subdivision: April 1970 96 

73 Distribution of Maryland State Roads Commission Employees, 

By Working Locations: May 1970 96 

74 Armed Services Personnel in Maryland and United States: 

June 30, 1969 97 

75 Weekly Average of State Insured Unemployed, By Industry 
Attachment and By Sex: Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, 1966 . . 98 

76 Department of Employment Security, Summary of State 
Activities: Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, 1964 99 

77 Non-Agricultural Employment Service Activities: Fiscal 

Years 1968, 1967, 1964 100 

78 Work Stoppages in Maryland and United States: 1965-1969. 101 
MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS 102 

79 Manufacturing Employment in Maryland, By Standard 
Industrial Classification, Annual Averages: 1968 and 

1960 104 

80 Manufacturing Employment in Principal Industries in 
Maryland Rank By Percentage of Change, Annual Averages: 

1968 and 1960 105 

81 Rate of Industry Growth, Manufacturing Employment in 
Maryland, Rank by 1960/1968 Growth Rate: 1960/1968 and 
1950/1960 106 

82 Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland: 

1968 and 1960 107 

83 Manufacturing Payrolls in Maryland, Rank by Dollar Value 

in 1968: 1968 and 1960 108 



VI 



Page 



Table No. 



84 Number of Manufacturing Firms in Maryland, By 

Political Subdivision: 1968, 1964, 1960, 1955, 1950. . . 109 

85 Manufacturing Payrolls, Maryland and Selected Eastern 
States, Regionally Ranked By Rate of Growth: 1967 and 

1958 110 

86 Number of Employees Engaged in Manufacturing, Maryland 
and Selected Eastern States, Regionally Ranked By Rate 

of Growth in Total Employees: 1967 and 1958 Ill 

87 Value Added By Manufacture, Maryland and Selected Eastern 
States, Regionally Ranked By Rate of Growth: 1968 and 

1967 112 

88 Value Added By Principal Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland, Rank By Dollar Volume: 1967 and 1958 113 

89 Value Added By Principal Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland, Rank By Per Cent Change: 1967 and 1958 .... 114 

90 Average Weekly Earnings in Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland, Rank By Dollar Value in 1968: 1968 and 1960. . 115 

91 Average Hourly Earnings in Manufacturing Industries in 
Maryland, Rank By Dollar Value in 1968: 1968 and 1960. . 116 

TRADE 117 

92 Trade Activity in Maryland, Number of Establishments and 

Total Sales or Receipts: 1967 and 1963 119 

93 Maryland Retail Trade, By Political Subdivision: 1967. . 121 

94 Maryland Retail Trade, By Political Subdivision: 1963. . 122 

95 Maryland Wholesale Trade, By Political Subdivision: 1967 123 

96 Maryland Wholesale Trade, By Political Subdivision: 1963 124 

97 Maryland Selected Services, By Political Subdivision: 

1967 125 

98 Maryland Selected Services, By Political Subdivision: 

1963 126 



VII 



Page 



Table No, 



99 Number of Establishments, By Kind of Business Group, 
Maryland Selected Services, By Political Subdivision: 
1967 127 

100 Number of Establishments, By Kind of Business Group, 
Maryland Selected Services, By Political Subdivision: 

1963 128 

PERSONAL INCOME 129 

101 Total Personal Income, Maryland and Selected Eastern 

States: 1968 and 1960 130 

102 Per Capita Income, Maryland and Selected Eastern States: 

1968 and 1960 131 

103 Personal Income By Major Source, Maryland: 1968 and 1960 132 

104 Estimated Per Capita and Household Disposable Income By 
Political Subdivision, Ranked By Per Capita Disposable 

Income: 1968 133 

105 Per Household Disposable Income, Maryland and Selected 
Eastern States: 1968 134 

106 Number of Households, By Highest and Lowest Income Group 

for Maryland and Selected Eastern States: 1968 135 

107 Gross State Product, Maryland, Current and Constant 

Dollars: 1950-1970 136 

108 Per Capita Income By Jurisdiction and the United States, 

Rank Order: 1969 137 

109 Total Personal Income, United States and the 51 Political 
Jurisdictions, Rank Order: 1969 138 

SOCIAL SERVICES 140 

110 Net Expenditures for All Programs By Source of Funds and 

By Department: Fiscal Year 1968 141 

111 Payments to Individuals and Families in Maryland: Fiscal 
Years 1966-1968 and 1964 142 



vm 



Page 



Table No. 



112 Average Number of Individuals or Families Assisted and 
Average Payment Per Individual or Family, By Program: 

Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, 1964 143 

113 Cases Receiving Financial Assistance, Maryland 1966-1968 

and 1964 144 

114 Services Other Than Assistance, In Programs: Fiscal 

Years 1968 and 1967 145 

115 Number of Applications for Assistance Received, Approved 
and Not Approved, Number of Cases Assisted, and Number of 
Cases Closed for Assistance: Fiscal Year 1968 146 

116 Per Cent Source of Funds By Type of Expenditure, Maryland: 
Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, and 1964 147 

CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET 148 

117 Consumer Price Indices, U. S. , Baltimore, Maryland, and 
Washington, D. C. : 1965-1969 149 

118 City Worker's Family Budget, Baltimore and Selected U. S. 

Cities: Autumn 1966 149 

i 

119 Indices of Total Cost of the City Worker's Family Budget, 
Average Earnings of Workers in Selected Occupational 
Groups, and Relative Advantage in 28 Metropolitan Areas: 

1966 150 

STATE FINANCE 152 

120 Net Cash Receipts, Maryland: Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, 

1960 153 

121 Net Cash Expenditures, Maryland: Fiscal Years 1968, 1967, 

1960 154 

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 155 

122 All Active Banks in Maryland, Summary of Assets and 
Liabilities: 1968 and 1960 156 

123 All Active National Banks in Maryland, Summary of Assets 

and Liabilities: 1968 and 1960 157 



IX 



Page 



Table No, 



124 All Active State Banks and Trust Companies in Maryland, 
Summary of Assets and Liabilities: 1968 and 1960 .... 158 

125 All Active Mutual Savings Banks in Maryland, Summary 

of Assets and Liabilities: 1968 and 1960 158 

126 Credit Unions in Maryland: 1968 and 1960 159 

127 Industrial Finance Companies in Maryland: 1968 and 1960. 159 

128 Combined Statement of Condition of All Building, Savings, 
and Loan Association Domiciled in Maryland: December 31, 

1968 160 

129 Comparative Sections of Financial Statements, Maryland 
Building, Savings, and Loan Associations: December 31, 

1968 and December 31, 1967 161 

130 Financial Statements, All State Chartered and Federal 
Chartered Building, Savings, and Loan Associations: 

December 31, 1968, December 31, 1967 162 

LIFE INSURANCE 163 

131 Life Insurance in Force in Maryland: 1968 164 

132 Purchase of Ordinary Life Insurance, Maryland: 1964-1968 164 
MASS MEDIA 165 

133 Television Stations in Maryland: 1970 167 

134 AM Radio Stations in Maryland: 1970 168 

135 FM Radio Stations in Maryland: 1970 170 

136 Television Broadcast Revenues, Expenses, and Income By 
Market, Baltimore and Washington, D. C. : 1968 171 

137 AM and AM/FM Broadcast Revenues, Expenses and Income, 
Maryland and Baltimore Metropolitan Area 172 

138 Daily Newspapers of General Circulation in Maryland . . . 173 



Page 
Table No. 
UTILITIES 174 

139 Gas Utility Industry, Customers, and Revenue, Maryland: 

1967 and 1960 175 

140 Installed Generating Capacity and Production of Electric 
Utilities and Installed Plants By Class of Ownership and 

Type of Prime Mover, Maryland: 1967 and 1960 176 

141 Commercial and Industrial Electric Sales in Maryland: 
1965-1969, 1960 177 

142 Telephone System in Maryland, Selected Data: 1968 and 

1966 178 

MOTOR VEHICLES 179 

143 Automotive Businesses in Maryland: 1967 180 

144 Motor Vehicles Assembled or Produced in Maryland: 1966- 

1968 181 

145 New Motor Vehicles Registration and Number of Licensed 
Drivers in Maryland: 1967 and 1966 181 

146 Motor Vehicle Registration in Maryland, By Type and 
Political Subdivision: 1968 and 1965 182 

147 Total Highway Mileage By Type of System in Maryland: 

1968 and 1960 183 

148 Average Daily Vehicle Miles, State Maintained Raods : 

1968 and 1959 184 

149 Traffic Volume at Toll Facilities in Maryland, Annual 

Totals: 1958-1968 185 

THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 186 

150 Import and Export Tonnage and Values, Port of Baltimore: 
1955-1968 187 

151 Import Trade of the Port of Baltimore Arranged By 
Principal Countries in Order of Tonnage and By Trade 

Areas: 1968 188 



XI 



Page 



Table No. 
152 

153 
154 

155 

156 

157 

158 

AIR TRAVEL 
159 

160 

AGRICULTURE 
161 
162 

163 
164 
165 

166 



Export Trade of the Port of Baltimore Arranged By- 
Principal Countries in Order of Tonnage and By Trade 
Areas: 1968 189 

Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterborne Trade, Imports: 1968 and 1967 190 

Ranking of Principal United States Seaports in Foreign 
Waterborne Trade, Exports: 1968 and 1967 191 

Value of Principal Categories of Commodities Exported 

From and Imported Into the Port of Baltimore: 1968 . . . 192 

Leading Commodities in Waterborne Commerce, Baltimore 

Harbor and Channels, In Short Tons: 1967 193 

Waterborne Commerce of the Principal Waterways in 

Maryland, in Short Tons: 1967 and 1959 194 

Waterborne Commerce of the Baltimore Harbor and Channels, 

In Short Tons: 1959-1967 195 

196 

Commercial Airports and Heliports in the State of 

Maryland, By Political Subdivision: 1968 197 

Friendship International Airport Operations: 1968 and 

1960 198 

199 

Cash Receipts From Farming, Maryland: 1967, 1966, 1965 . 200 

Selected Commodities Indices, Prices Received By Farmers, 
Maryland: 1964-1969 202 

Number of Farms and Land in Farms, Maryland: 1964-1969 . 202 

Workers on Farms in Maryland: 1966-1968 202 

Livestock and Poultry in Maryland, Number on Farms: 

1964-1969 203 

Livestock and Poultry in Maryland, Value By Species: 

1964-1969 204 



XII 



Page 
Table No. 
CONSTRUCTION 205 

167 Annual Value of Construction Contracts Awarded in 

Maryland: 1960-1968 206 

168 New Building Permits for Private Residential Dwelling 

Units Authorized in Maryland: 1964-1968, 1959 207 

169 Value of Construction Contracts For Work Completed in 

the United States and in Maryland: 1965-1967, 1960 ... 208 

170 Annual Value of Non-Residential and Residential Contracts 
Awarded in Maryland: 1960-1968 208 

171 New Housing Starts, Maryland: 1959-1969 209 

172 Mobile Home Shipments Into Maryland: 1960-1969 210 

REAL ESTATE 211 

173 Number of Real Properties and Real Property Assessed 

Values, By Political Subdivision: 1968 212 

174 Real Property Assessment Level Ratios, By Political 
Subdivision: 1968, 1966, 1964 213 

175 Real Property Leased to the Federal Government and 
Federally Owned Real Property in Maryland: 1968, 1966, 

and 1960 214 

176 Major Military Installations in Maryland: 1969 215 

FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND 216 

177 Relative Position of the State: 1968 217 

178 Functional Summary of Federal Outlays, Maryland: 1968. . 218 

179 Political Subdivision Summary of Federal Outlays in 

Maryland: 1968 220 

180 Federal Expenditures for Selected Functional Categories 
United States, Appalachia, Appalachian Portion of 

Maryland: Fiscal Year 1968 226 

181 Federal Outlays in Maryland, By Political Subdivision: 

1968 228 



XI 11 



o 



> 



-a 



o i 



n 



'O: 



yo 



U-l 



=> z 



■<?' 



•G? 



o 

< 

X 



O 



|0*l 



o 



o 



Q 
V 



i. 



o 



3 

o 
o 





5 

UJ 

O 



O 

1 

•I 



>■ 
.2 



i 1 

c 

1 

I 



• ■* 



NO. 1 GEOGRAPHICAL REGIONS OF MARYLAND GROUPED BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



SUB -REG IONS 

Baltimore Area 

Baltimore City- 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Howard 
Harford 
Carroll 

Western Maryland 

Frederick 
Washington 
Allegany 
Garrett 

Washington Suburbs 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 

Southern Maryland 

Charles 
St. Mary's 
Calvert 

Eastern Shore 

Kent 

Queen Anne's 

Talbot 

Caroline 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

Worcester 

Northern Maryland 

Cecil 



Note: Planning Regions - Maryland State Planning Department 



-2- 



POPULATION AND VITAL STATISTICS 

The population of Maryland has grown very rapidly in the period 
from 1960 to 1969, with an increase of 21.4 per cent estimated by the 
U. S. Bureau of the Census. This figure makes the State the seventh 
fastest growing in the nation, on a percentage basis, and substantially 
above the national increase of 12.6 per cent. 

Data furnished by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental 
Hygiene indicate considerable variance of growth as between the counties. 
Prince George's County led the increase with a growth of 80.4 per cent 
over the 1960 to 1969 period. Next were Howard County (58.2 per cent), 
Harford (45.5 per cent), Anne Arundel (42.8 per cent), and Montgomery 
(41.0 per cent) Counties. At the opposite extreme with losses during 
this period were Somerset (2.2 per cent loss) and Dorchester (2.6 per 
cent loss) Counties while Baltimore City data show a loss of 4.5 per 
cent. 

Consistent with national growth patterns the population shifts 
have been urban in nature. The greatest increases are to be found in 
suburban metropolitan Washington and metropolitan Baltimore. As is 
readily seen, with the exception of Baltimore City itself, the political 
subdivisions with below average grown are predominantly rural in their 
characteristics. Approximately 83 per cent of Marylanders reside in 
the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas, with the greater growth 
coming from Prince George's and Montgomery Counties (suburban Washington.) 

More detailed demographic aspects available as of this writing 
are for 1968. Baltimore City contains by far the greatest concentration 
of non-white citizens in the State. Of the 647,330 non-white Marylanders, 
392,500, or 60.6 per cent reside in that jurisdiction. The overall per- 
centage of non-white persons in the State is 17.2 while the Baltimore 



-3- 



City percentage is 43.8. 

The birth rate of the general population in Maryland followed 
the declining national trend. All political subdivisions shared in this 
decline. The 1968 birth rate for Maryland was 18.2 per 1,000 population, 
with the white birth rate standing at 17.0 and the non-white at 23.9. 
Meanwhile the death rate in the State was 8.7 per 1,000 population with 
the white death rate at a level of 8.4 and the non-white at 10.0. 

The entrance into marriage age of children born in the post World 
War II surge is apparent with the 51,165 marriages in the State during 
1968. Divorces and Annulments increased to 8>151 for the same year, 
with a majority (57.3 per cent) being granted on the grounds of voluntary 
separation. 



■4- 



0. 2 



POPULATION, STATE OF MARYLAND AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS, RANK BY 1969: 

1969 AND 1960 



OLITICAL SUBDIVISION JULY 1, 1969 



RANK 
1969 1960 



APRIL 1, 1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1969 



laryland 

altimore City 
rince George's 
altimore 
lontgomery 
nne Arundel 

arford 

ashington 

rederick 

llegany 

arroll 

oward 

icomico 

ecil 

t . Mary ' s 
harles 

orchester 

orcester 

arrett 

albot 

alvert 

aroline 
Dmerset 
aeen Anne's 
Bit 



3,824,800 






3,100,689 


23.4 


897,000 


1 


1 


939,024 


-4.5 


644,800 


2 


3 


357,395 


80.4 


602,100 


3 


2 


492,428 


22.3 


480,600 


4 


4 


340,928 


41.0 


295,100 


5 


5 


206,634 


42.8 


111,600 


6 


8 


76,722 


45.5 


109,400 


7 


6 


91,219 


19.9 


87,300 


8 


9 


71,930 


21.4 


86,500 


9 


7 


84,169 


2.8 


65,300 


10 


10 


52,785 


23.7 


57,200 


11 


14 


36,152 


58.2 


53,500 


12 


11 


49,050 


9.1 


53,300 


13 


12 


48,408 


10.1 


44,300 


14 


13 


38,915 


13.8 


43,700 


15 


15 


32,572 


34.2 


28,900 


16 


16 


29,666 


-2.6 


26,400 


17 


17 


23,733 


11.2 


23,800 


18 


19 


20,420 


16.6 


22,100 


19 


18 


21,578 


2.4 


19,600 


20 


23 


15,826 


23.8 


19,500 


21 


21 


19,462 


.2 


19,200 


22 


20 


19,623 


-2.2 


17,800 


23 


22 


16,569 


7.4 


15,800 


24 


24 


15,481 


2.1 



xirces : 



Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Biostatistics , 
by report dated October 1, 1969. 

U. S. Bureau of Census, "U. S. Census of Population: 1960," Vol. 1, Part 
22, Maryland, p. 9. 



-5- 



NO. 3 POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, RANK BY 

PER CENT OF CHANGE: 1968 AND 1960 



JURISDICTION 



JULY 1, 1969 



APRIL 1, 1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



United States 



201,921,000 



179,323,175 



12.6 



Nevada 

Arizona 

Florida 

Hawaii 

Alaska 



457,000 

1,693,000 

6,354,000 

794,000 

282,000 



285,278 

1,302,161 

4,951,560 

632,772 

226,167 



60.2 
30.0 

28.3 
25.5 
24.7 



California 

Maryland 

Delaware 

Colorado 

Washington 



19,443,000 

3,765,000 

540,000 

2,100,000 

3,402,000 



15,717,204 

3,100,689 

446,292 

1,753,947 

2,853,214 



23.7 
21.4 
21.0 
19.7 
19.2 



Connecticut 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
Virginia 
Georgia 



3,000,000 
717,000 
7,148,000 
4,669,000 
4,641,000 



2,535,234 
606,921 
6,066,782 
3,966,949 
3,943,116 



18.3 
18.1 
17.8 
17.7 
17.7 



Utah 

Texas 

Louisiana 

Oregon 

North Carolina 



1,045,000 
11,187,000 
3,745,000 
2,032,000 
5,205,000 



890,627 
9,579,677 
3,257,022 
1,768,687 
4,556,155 



17.3 
16.8 
15.0 
14.9 
14.2 



South Carolina 

Vermont 

Michigan 

Tennessee 

Arkansas 



2,692,000 
439,000 
8,766,000 
3,985,000 
1,995,000 



2,382,594 
389,881 
7,823,194 
3,567,089 
1,786,272 



13.0 
12.6 
12.1 
11.7 
11.7 



Ohio 

Oklahoma 
Indiana 
Illinois 
New York 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Alabama 

Missouri 

Idaho 



10,740,000 

2,568,000 

5,118,000 

11,047,000 

18,321,000 

3,700,000 
2,360,000 
3,531,000 
4,651,000 
718,000 



9,706,397 

2,328,284 

4,662,498 

10,081,158 

16,782,304 

3,413,864 
2,178,141 
3,266,740 
4,319,813 
667,191 



10.6 

10.3 

9.8 

9.6 

9.2 

8.4 
8.3 
8.1 
7.7 
7.6 



(continued on following page) 



•6- 



NO. 3 POPULATION OF THE 50 STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, RANK BY 
PER CENT OF CHANGE: 1968 AND 1960 (Cont'd.) 



JURISDICTION 



JULY 1, 1969 





PER CENT CHANGE 


IL 1, 1960 


1960/1968 


3,951,777 


7.1 


2,178,611 


6.5 


3,038,156 


6.4 


5,148,578 


6.2 


859,488 


6.0 


763,956 


4.5 


951,023 


4.5 


11,319,366 


4.3 


674,767 


2.9 


1,411,330 


2.7 


969,265 


.9 


2,757,537 


.9 


1,860,421 


-2.2 


632,446 


-2.8 


330,066 


-3.1 


680,514 


-3.2 



Wisconsin 
Kansas 
Kentucky 
Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 

District of Columbia 

New Mexico 

Pennsylvania 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Maine 

Iowa 

West Virginia 

North Dakota 

Wyoming 

South Dakota 



4,233,000 
2,321,000 
3,232,000 
5,467,000 
911,000 

798,000 

994,000 

11,803,000 

694,000 

1,449,000 

978,000 
2,781,000 
1,819,000 
615,000 
320,000 
659,000 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, "Estimate of the 
Population of States," Series P-25, No. 436, January 7, 1970. 



-7- 



NO. 4 POPULATION DENSITY OF MARYLAND AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS: 1969 AND 1960 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



JULY 1, 1969 



APRIL 1, 1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1969 



Maryland 
Maryland Urban 
Maryland Rural 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St . Mary ' s 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



3,824,800 


3,100,689 


NA 


2,253,832 


NA 


846,857 


86,500 


84,169 


295,100 


206,634 


897,000 


939,024 


602,100 


492,428 


19,600 


15,826 


19,500 


19,462 


65,300 


52,785 


53,300 


48,408 


43,700 


32,572 


28,900 


29,666 


87,300 


71,930 


23,800 


20,420 


111,600 


76,722 


57,200 


36,152 


15,800 


15,481 


480,600 


340,928 


644,800 


357,395 


17,800 


16,569 


44,300 


38,915 


19,200 


19,623 


22,100 


21,578 


109,400 


91,219 


53,500 


49,050 


26,400 


23,733 



23.4 

NA 
NA 

2.8 
42.8 
-4.5 
22.3 
23.8 

.2 
23.7 
10.1 
34.2 
-2.6 

21.4 
16.6 
45.5 
58.2 
2.1 

41.0 



80, 

7, 

13, 

-2, 

2, 
19, 

9, 
11, 



Sources: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Bio- 
statistics, by report dated October 1, 1969. 

U. S. Bureau of Census, "U. S. Census of Population: 1960," Vol. 1, 
Part 22, Maryland, p. 9. 



NO. 5 POPULATION DENSITY OF MARYLAND SUBDIVISIONS, RANKED BY LAND 

AREA: JANUARY 1970 ^ 







LAND 








AREA IN 


POPULATION EST. 


POPULATION DENSITY 


SUBDIVISIONS 


SQ. MI. 


FOR JAN. 1, 1970 


PEOPLE/SQ. MI. 



Maryland 



9,874 



Frederick 


664 


Garrett 


662 


Baltimore 


608 


Dorchester 


580 


Montgomery- 


493 


Prince George's 


485 


Worcester 


483 


Washington 


462 


Charles 


458 


Carroll 


453 


Harford 


448 


Allegany 


426 


Anne Arundel 


417 


Wicomico 


380 


Queen Anne ' s 


367 


Cecil 


352 


Somerset 


332 


Caroline 


320 


Kent 


284 


Talbot 


279 


Howard 


250 


Calvert 


219 


Baltimore City 


79 



3,860,000 

87,900 
23,900 

606,300 
28,800 

487,200 

659,900 
26,500 

110,100 
44,300 
65,900 

113,300 
86,400 

299,300 
53,600 
44,500 
53,500 
19,100 
19,500 
15,700 

22,100 

58,300 

19,700 

896,500 



390.9 

132.4 
36.1 

997.2 
49.7 

988.2 

1,360.6 
54.9 

238.3 
96.7 

145.5 

252.9 

202.8 

717.7 

141.1 

121.3 

152.0 

57.5 

60.9 

55.3 

79.2 

233.2 

90.0 

11,348.1 



(1) 



Estimated by Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of 
Biostatistics, by report dated October 1, 1969. 



•9- 



NO. 6 



MARYLAND POPULATION GROWTH: 1860-1969 







INCREASE 


OVER PRECEDING 


CENSUS 


PEF 


I CENT 
S. POP 


INCREASE OF 










U. 


ULATION OVER 










PRECEDING 


CENSUS - - 










OF 


THE CONTERMINOUS 


YEAR 


POPULATION 


NUMBER 


PER CENT 




UNITED STATES C 1 ) 


1969 (Est.) 


3,824,800 


724,111 


23.4 






12.6 


1960 


3,100,689 


757,688 


32.3 






18.4 


1950 


2,343,001 


521,757 


28.6 






14.5 


1940 


1,821,244 


189,718 


11.6 






7.2 


1930 


1,631,526 


181,875 


12.5 






16.1 


1920 


1,449,661 


154,315 


11.9 






14.9 


1910 


1,295,346 


107,302 


9.0 






21.0 


1900 


1,188,044 


145,654 


14.0 






20.7 


1890 


1,042,390 


107,447 


11.5 






25.5 


1880 


934,943 


154,049 


19.7 






26.0 


1870 


780,894 


93,845 


13.7 






26.6 


1860 


687,049 


104,015 


17.8 






35.6 



(1) 



All years except 1969 exclude Hawaii and Alaska, 



Sources: Estimate for July 1, 1969, Maryland Department of Health and Mental 
Hygiene, Division of Biostatistics , Report, October 1, 1969. Other 
years, U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Population: I960," 
Part 22, Maryland, p. 6. 



10- 



NO. 7 POPULATION OF SELECTED MARYLAND TOWNS, CITIES, AND AREAS: 1968 AND 1960 



AREA 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Baltimore City ... 

Baltimore Metropolitan Area 
Maryland Suburban Washington Area 

Annapolis 

Cumberland 

Easton 

Frederick 

Hagerstown 

Hyattsville 

Rockville 

Salisbury 

Westminster 



(2) 



918,200 


939,024 


2,019,200 


1,803,745 


1,095,600 


698,223 


35,000 


23,385 


33,300 


33,415 


7,300 


6,337 


25,800 


21,744 


38,800 


36,660 


18,000 


15,168 


41,000 


26,090 


17,600 


16,302 


6,700 


6,123 



-2.2 
11.9 
56.9 

49.7 

-.4 

15.2 

18.7 

5.8 

18.7 

57.1 

8.0 

9.4 



CD 

(2) 



Includes Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and 
Howard Counties. 

Includes Montgomery and Prince George's Counties. 



Sources: Sales Management, "Survey of Buying Power," June 10, 1969. 

Copyright 1969, Sales Management Survey of Buying Power; further 
reproduction is forbidden. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U.S. Census of Population: 1960," 
Vol. I, Part 22, Maryland pp. 12 and 13. 



-11- 



o 

4 

o 
cd 
w 

rt 

CI 

4 



{D 05 

</) t— ' 

3* o- 

H- O 



O 

o 

n- * 

n era 
o r+ 

o 

3 



M in O W 
On OJ si ts) 



K) -^ (O H 1 
U1 H A lO 
O O O O 



I— ' js. O I— ' 
sj M Ji On 



in W O *> 
O -J ID O 
O O O O 



OO K) W Ul 



si O ts) sj 
On Js. On ID 

o o o o 



1— ' OJ 00 h- ' 

tn 00 00 on 



On O in si 

ON -^ 00 t— ' 
A in is) ni 



00 



O O ON 00 

ON O O-l ON 

ID in si H 



ts) Js. ON 

W W s] o> 

I— ■ On ts) I— • 

s] O t— ' Is) 



O 00 00 ts) 

On <D OJ 00 



H 00 00 -ti 
si s] K) OJ 



oo >o w 



J^ t> M NJ 



W W fs) 

W IN) W C? 



O rf C <-i O 

CD 

CD 

3 



CD 

>-s 2 

in p 

CD 4 



IQ 



3 
o era 

CD O 

3 CD CD 
3 CD H 
C/i CD O ^< 
- H 
(/> era 
CD 

</> 



On js. 
Js. h- ' I— • On 
Js. -J -Pi si 



7s 

CD 
3 
r+ 



X CD "Tl 
P) H 4 
4 H CD 

O CD CD 

D. rf H- 
O 
5s- 



O CD CD CD CD 
O 3* CD p 05 
hj p O 



O 4 

3* h-- 

CD CD 

(/) l/> 

CD 

4 



4 o 
o •— 

(— > H- 
CD 



n ro ro > ^ 

05 P p 3 i— ■ 

t— > i— « i— ' 3 t— ' 

CD CD 

era 
> P 
4 3 
C *•< 

3 

O- 

CD CD 



< 

CD 

<-+ 



CD CD 



h in OK) oo 
W l/i oo W in 



ts) -pi in On t— ' 

(O M W A ^D 






in 00 ts) 

H ID ID 00 OO 

<d w ni c^ e> 



-pi O -J si OJ 

W VO si IaI o^ 

o o o o o 



in .pi 
»— ■ oj i— ' m .pi 

ts) in oj O si 



00 t— • OJ in <D 

ohoocmo 
o o o o o 



On ID ts) 00 

O 00 w o 



I— » On t— ' ts) On 
ts) 00 (— ' O OJ 

o o o o o 



ts) ts) *>. On I— ■ 

o oo <o h in 



OJ Ul ID nI si 
in O O On -Pi 
O O O O O 



in in ts) 

i— ' s] O in oo 
i— • in in O in 



H si K) O *. 

iflin h o) o 
o o o o o 



ON (— ' 

s] 00 -Pi -Pi '-D 



ID js. si js. ON 

si O M ON ID 

o o o o o 



W -Pi (D 



in 



t— ' On ID sj s] 

W W si H in 
O O O O O 



00 £i OJ Is) OJ 



OJ fs) -Pi js. js. 

I— ' O O I— ' OJ 

o o o o o 



OJ 

\-^ VD OJ 
00 00 Is) ON 



ts) OJ in si ID 

js, j^ as o on 

o o o o o 



00 si in h K) 

00 ID (DO id 

o o o o o 



<D O I— ' js. 00 
ID in js, vD 00 
O O O O O 



O oj in i*i oj 

Js, O O in i— i 
O O O O O 



OJ Ol 

is) ts) 

J^. ON 



I— ' OJ On ts) On 

HKHOOON 



K> ts) js, in i— ' 
O i— » in O in 



4^ On l—i 
si K si 00 
ID Js- O On ts) 



Id ON H si s! 

H si O H W 

in ts) -Pi -Pi On 



OJ i— 

-pi fs) oj 



On O O OJ s] 
O s] 00 00 si 

W O WO ID 



OJ -P* s] 



ON On Oi On in 
J^ On On 00 K) 

Oi H 0O -C> 00 



ID O Ifl ts) W 



1— ' 00 On O <D 
in ID O J^ On 
Ji W OO in ID 



On 



OJ 

i— ' is) o-i 

si 00 O 



OJ IS) JS, ON t— ' 

O js, ON 00 UD 
00 Oi in i— ' ts) 



00 O ON I— 1 

si oo J^ -Pi in 
00 ts) O O t— i 



ID s] O 

w in h 



I— ' si W 

M W si ts) si 



t J 


i— 1 










in 


ts) 




t— ' 


OJ 


h- • 


sj 


ON 




'-D 


l— 1 OJ 


JSi 


* 


\m 




** 


-* s» 


W 


w 


-pi 


OJ 


O 


in >— ' 


o 


OJ 


OJ 


ON 


oj 


si -Pi 


in 


in 


IS) 


ID 


00 


00 O 


O 



in js m h 
K) is) t— ' in ID 



O tD O Is) ID 
IS) I— ' js. O OJ 

O I— • O t— ' J^ 



O -P- H 

in i— ■ si js. i— ■ 

Ji> O O I— ' ON 

On 00 IS3 in 00 



OJ Is) 

H H ID H 



On in js. on ts) 
si OJ I— i 00 O 

is) in ON (O O 



O-b 00 

W H H O tS) 

in O h h Oi 

IS) si fs) IS) si 

js. rs) Ji» On >— ' 



ts) ts) Ol 

ts) O js. 00 O-l 



O W ts)0 H 



I— 1 ON OJ 

H IN) tO lO H 



js. vj ts) J^ in 



in js, i_ ■ ts) 
Oa si ts) in O 



ID O si On ID 



OI *— ' ts) 
ts) ts) O ts) 



OJ in js. oo i— ' 



ts) ts) I— ' -Pi 
OJ I— ' s] Is) Oi 



O ID K Ji ts) 



i— ■ VD in 

in ts) oo i— • 



ts) ts) <D i— ■ oo 



t— ' ts) in 
si in O ts) 



in ts) t— ' O Ji. 



ts) I— ' 

00 OJ OJ 



On t— ' Is) Is) O 



ts) h-> I— • 

O J^ <D 00 ID 



IOHPO w 



OJ 1— ■ ts) t— ' 
si 00 in O Ji. 



M OJ in O si 



ts) 

-pi 00 00 



OJ in O i— ' 



OJ <D si in oj 



On 
in si ID js, ts) 



OJ 00 OJ 



OJ OJ I— 1 

O ts) in OJ <D 



in js. t/i oo ts) 



js. js. (-• 

t— ' OJ OJ ts) t— • 



ID ID <D <D 00 



ON H si si in 



P 

i— 1 
P 

3 



s] 

in 
in 

O 
-pi 

O 



o 

si 



s] 

h- ' 

o 



On 
-Pi 
s] 

OJ 
OJ 
O 



OJ 

















OJ 


OJ 






















Js. ID 


ts) 




h- ■ 




ts) 


-pi 


ID 


IS) 


h- • 


OJ 


h- 1 


in 


4> 


1— • 


w 


si ts) 


si 


ts) 


OJ 


-pi 


in 


t— 1 


I— 1 


ID OJ 


o 


00 


O 


— 


OJ 


ID 


>— ■ 


i— ■ 


ID 


00 


ON 


s] 


o 


in 


On 


On O 


t—' 


<D 


ts) 


00 


Is) 


ID 


in 


ts) ID 


On 


Ji- 


O 


O 

> 


sj 


o 


ts) 


in 


On 


lO 


in 


w 


ID 


J^ 


t— ' 


si *> 


ID 


ON 


in 


-ft. 


si 


J^ 


00 


Ji. O 


<J 


I— 1 


ON 


OJ 


in 


h- < 


si 


ts) 


l—l 


On 


*D 


ts) 


oo 


in 


ts) ts) 


OJ 


ON 


si 


3 


CO 


ON 


ts) 


ts) ts) 


W 


On 


00 


r^ 


OJ 


o 


'D 


00 


OJ 


un 


ID 


in 


00 


t— ' 


Is) 


ts) O 


O 


On 


Is) 


CO 


On 


ts) 


On 


00 J^ 


J> 


ID 


ID 





on 
si 
OJ 

ID 

VD 



in 
ts) 

ON 

si 
si 

O 



On 
in 
-pi 

OJ 
on 



ts) 

O 



Is) 
Is) 



ID 



si 
ts) 



<D 

On CD H 

O X O 

^s > H 

i- 1 Z > 

^D CD r^ 

on m 

00 







CD 






H 


1 — 1 


t— ' 


|T] 


CD 


~ 


U 


•JZ 


to 


Jt> 


ra 


m 


H 


3 


a 


z 


z 


— 


> 


CO 


o 


CD 

m 

CD 


H 




r- 


h- 1 


h- ' 


X 


CD 


T3 


X 


'3 


'3 


> 


m 


m 


1 — 1 


o- 


o- 


z 


z 


— 


H 


co 


CC: 


CD 

m 


H 




m 









-a 










n 


m 


s 




i — i 


i — i 


X 


?a 


X 


Z 


ID 


«3 


> 




1— { 


U 


3 


ON 


z 


CD 


H 


Z 


CO 


o 


m 


m 


m 


i 




cc: 


| 


z 


CD 


-a 


ID 


r^ 


i— i 


o 


m 


rr 


a 


-< 


H 


2 


cz 


73 


CO 


i — i 


m 


1 


H 





•12- 



NO. 9 ESTIMATED MARYLAND POPULATION BY RACE AND AGE GROUP: JULY 1, 1968 





AGE GROUP 


TOTAL 


WHITE 


NON-WHITE 


Total 


3,755,040 


3,107,710 


674,330 


Under 5 


374,390 


293,750 


80,640 


5-9 


412,570 


326,500 


86,070 


10-14 


396,030 


318,570 


77,460 


15-19 


343,700 


278,150 


65,550 


20-24 


288,550 


240,820 


47,730 


25-29 


262,930 


222,900 


40,030 


30-34 


224,170 


187,520 


36,650 


35-39 


214,920 


177,360 


37,560 


40-44 


230,380 


191,900 


38,480 


45-54 


434,550 


369,070 


65,480 


55-64 


296,560 


257,390 


39,170 


65-74 


176,900 


156,600 


20,300 


75 and Over 


99,390 


87,180 


12,210 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report 1968," p. 5. 



13- 



NO. 10 COMPARATIVE POPULATION ESTIMATES AND VITAL STATISTICS DATA, BY RACE 

FOR MARYLAND REGIONS: 1968 



RACE AND REGION 



POPULATION 
JULY 1, 1968 



BIRTHS 



INFANT 
DEATHS DEATHS 



BIRTH 
RATE^ 



DEATH MORT^ 
RATE*- 1 - 1 RATE ( 



Total 

Northwest Area 
Baltimore Metro Area 
National Capital Area 
Southern Area 
Eastern Shore Area 

White 

Northwest Area 
Baltimore Metro Area 
National Capital Area 
Southern Area 
Eastern Shore Area 

Nonwhite 

Northwest Area 
Baltimore Metro Area 
National Capital Area 
Southern Area 
Eastern Shore Area 



3,755,040 


68,407 


32,596 


1,473 


18.2 


8.7 


21.5 


304,220 


4,789 


2,966 


85 


15.7 


9.7 


17.7 


2,005,850 


35,116 


19,729 


805 


17.5 


9.8 


22. S 


1,082,090 


21,825 


6,119 


412 


20.2 


5.7 


18 J 


106,120 


2,537 


784 


64 


23.9 


7.4 


25.2 


256,760 


4,140 


2,998 


107 


16.1 


11.7 


25. J 


3,107,710 


52,955 


26,102 


954 


17.0 


8.4 


18. C 


294,270 


4,566 


2,841 


79 


15.5 


9.7 


17.2 


1,541,830 


24,233 


14,821 


432 


15.7 


9.6 


17.? 


997,430 


19,540 


5,622 


351 


19.6 


5.6 


18. C 


75,690 


1,701 


532 


31 


22.5 


7.0 


18.2 


198,490 


2,915 


2,286 


61 


14.7 


11.5 


20. S 



647,330 15,452 



6,494 



519 



23.9 



10.0 



33, 



9,950 


223 


125 


6 


22.4 


12.6 


26. S 


464,020 


10,883 


4,908 


373 


23.5 


10.6 


34.2 


84,660 


2,285 


497 


61 


27.0 


5.9 


26.7 


30,430 


836 


252 


33 


27.5 


8.3 


39. £ 


58,270 


1,225 


712 


46 


21.0 


12.2 


37.6 



^ -'Per 1,000 population. 

(2) 

*- J Per 1,000 live births. 

Note: The geographic regions of the state and the political subdivisions they include £ 



Northwest 
Area 

Garrett 
Allegany 
Washington 
Frederick 



Southern 
Area 

Calvert 
Charles 
St. Mary's 



Baltimore Metro 
Area 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Howard 

Harford 



National Capital 
Area 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 



Eastern 
Shore Area 

Cecil 

Kent 

Queen Anne 1 

Caroline 

Talbot 

Dorchester 

Wicomico 

Somerset 

Worcester 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics and 
Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 65. 



-14- 



0. 11 



ESTIMATED MARYLAND WHITE POPULATION, BY AGE GROUP AND 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: JULY 1, 1968 







ALL AGES 






AGE GROUP 






DLITICAL SUBDIVISION 


UNDER 1 


1-4 


5-17 


18-44 


45-64 


65+ 


aryland 


3,107,710 


52,380 


241,370 


820,100 


1,123,620 


626,460 


243,780 


11 eg any 


85,430 


1,220 


5,660 


19,940 


29,720 


20,160 


8,730 


nne Arundel 


250,410 


4,220 


19,770 


69,240 


100,620 


43,810 


12,750 


altimore City 


505,400 


7,400 


33,000 


108,500 


150,100 


133,200 


73,200 


altimore 


575,200 


8,980 


40,060 


157,560 


218,730 


113,250 


36,620 


alvert 


11,310 


190 


810 


2,950 


3,470 


2,550 


1,340 


aroline 


15,750 


220 


1,070 


3,970 


4,480 


3,840 


2,170 


arroll 


61,710 


1,020 


4,700 


15,970 


21,350 


12,490 


6,180 


ecil 


49,970 


990 


4,320 


12,740 


19,780 


8,560 


3,580 


iarles 


28,630 


610 


2,430 


8,420 


10,150 


5,020 


2,000 


orchester 


20,130 


240 


1,110 


3,940 


6,170 


5,560 


3,110 


rederick 


80,690 


1,260 


6,010 


21,110 


30,320 


15,380 


6,610 


arrett 


23,460 


370 


1,700 


5,940 


8,130 


4,840 


2,480 


arford 


98,710 


1,790 


8,780 


28,020 


39,910 


15,020 


5,190 


Dward 


50,400 


760 


4,140 


14,930 


19,350 


8,560 


2,660 


3nt 


11,970 


160 


760 


2,740 


3,920 


2,720 


1,670 


Dntgomery 


447,400 


6,990 


34,050 


136,490 


157,740 


87,110 


25,020 


rince George's 


550,030 


12,140 


55,920 


149,330 


214,690 


92,540 


25,410 


aeen Anne's 


13,210 


160 


820 


3,050 


4,140 


3,250 


1,790 


t . Mary ' s 


35,750 


910 


3,480 


9,530 


15,580 


4,420 


1,830 


>merset 


12,190 


120 


620 


2,410 


3,570 


3,480 


1,990 


ilbot 


16,400 


200 


1,010 


3,840 


4,800 


4,100 


2,450 


ishington 


104,690 


1,650 


7,550 


25,850 


38,280 


21,890 


9,470 


.comico 


41,370 


560 


2,690 


10,210 


13,200 


9,890 


4,820 


>rcester 


17,500 


220 


910 


3,420 


5,420 


4,820 


2,710 



>urce : 



Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 3. 



-15- 



NO. 12 



ESTIMATED MARYLAND NONWHITE POPULATION, BY AGE GROUP AND 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: JULY 1, 1968 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION ALL AGES UNDER 1 



AGE GROUP 



1-4 



5-17 



18-44 45-64 



65+ 



Maryland 



647,330 



15,040 65,600 205,500 224,030 104,650 32,510 



Allegany 


1,310 


20 


90 


280 


620 


190 


110 


Anne Arundel 


36,350 


650 


3,210 


10,440 


14,440 


5,520 


2,090 


Baltimore City 


392,500 


9,400 


40,300 


120,400 


135,900 


66,800 


19,700 


Baltimore 


18,300 


350 


1,580 


5,380 


6,350 


3,490 


1,150 


Calvert 


8,040 


230 


1,000 


3,050 


2,460 


950 


350 


Caroline 


3,880 


90 


400 


1,360 


1,070 


670 


290 


Carroll 


2,490 


40 


210 


600 


840 


530 


270 


Cecil 


3,140 


80 


330 


870 


1,150 


470 


240 


Charles 


14,050 


370 


1,790 


5,830 


4,080 


1,500 


480 


Dorchester 


8,990 


210 


840 


3,200 


2,450 


1,700 


590 


Frederick 


5,290 


140 


640 


1,860 


1,480 


740 


430 


Garrett 


100 


- 


- 


100 


- 


- 


- 


Harford 


9,590 


200 


940 


3,150 


3,610 


1,130 


560 


Howard 


4,790 


90 


450 


1,570 


1,600 


760 


320 


Kent 


3,880 


80 


370 


1,240 


1,100 


770 


320 


Montgomery 


19,960 


480 


1,850 


5,980 


7,930 


2,980 


740 


Prince George's 


64,700 


1,590 


6,370 


23,710 


23,560 


7,940 


1,530 


Queen Anne's 


4,560 


70 


370 


1,420 


1,360 


990 


350 


St . Mary ' s 


8,340 


240 


1,210 


2,910 


2,590 


1,040 


350 


Somerset 


7,240 


120 


620 


2,430 


2,140 


1,320 


610 


Talbot 


5,790 


100 


570 


1,720 


1,580 


1,260 


560 


Washington 


3,250 


50 


230 


640 


1,740 


390 


200 


Wicomico 


12,040 


240 


1,280 


4,320 


3,470 


2,010 


720 


Worcester 


8,750 


200 


950 


3,040 


2,510 


1,500 


550 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 4. 



-16- 



0. 13 



MARRIAGE BY RESIDENT STATUS AND TYPE OF CEREMONY, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION OF OCCURRENCE: 1968 



MARRIAGE BY RESIDENCE CD' 



TYPE OF CEREMONY 



DLITICAL SUB- 
IVISION OF 
CCURRENCE TOTAL 



MARYLAND 
RESIDENTS 



NON-RESIDENTS 



CD 



NUMBER PER CENT RELIGIOUS NUMBER PER CENT 



aryland 



51,165 



llegany 2,361 

nne Arundel 2,715 

altimore City 10,465 
altimore 4,991 

alvert 179 



aroline 

arroll 

ecil 

harles 
orchester 

rederick 
arret t 
arford 
Dward 
snt 



415 
752 
7,255 
579 
341 

1,120 
1,544 
1,459 

718 
186 



Dntgomery 5,240 
rince George's 5,769 

ieen Anne's 146 

b. Mary's 402 

bmerset 256 

ilbot 287 

ishington 2,739 

comico 789 

jrcester 457 



34,348 

869 
2,365 
9,664 
4,520 

168 

216 
559 
815 
402 

312 

850 
275 
962 
679 
137 

3,909 

4,764 

124 

372 

209 

257 

1,114 

538 

268 



16,817 



32.9 



1,492 


63.2 


350 


12.9 


801 


7.7 


471 


9.4 


11 


6.1 


199 


48.0 


193 


25.7 


6,440 


88.8 


177 


30.6 


29 


8.5 


270 


24.1 


1,269 


82.2 


497 


34.1 


39 


5.4 


49 


26.3 


1,331 


25.4 


1,005 


17.4 


22 


15.1 


30 


7.5 


47 


18.4 


30 


10.5 


1,625 


59.3 


251 


31.8 


189 


41.4 



37,659 13,506 26.4 



1,610 


751 


31.8 


2,250 


465 


17.1 


8,734 


1,731 


16.5 


4,351 


640 


12.8 


161 


18 


10.1 


381 


34 


8.2 


585 


167 


22.2 


3,271 


3,984 


54.9 


381 


198 


34.2 


327 


14 


4.1 


898 


222 


19.8 


1,022 


522 


33.8 


958 


501 


34.3 


508 


210 


29.2 


154 


32 


17.2 


3,764 


1,476 


28.2 


4,305 


1,464 


25.4 


128 


18 


12.3 


300 


102 


25.4 


246 


10 


3.9 


262 


25 


8.7 


1,946 


793 


29.0 


698 


91 


11.5 


419 


38 


8.3 



Marriages refer to the number of ceremonies performed, not the number of persons 
married. 

Both partners were now residents of Maryland. 



>urce: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics and 
Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 50. 



-17- 



NO. 14 



BIRTHS AND BIRTH RATES BY RACE FOR MARYLAND AND POLITICAL 

SUBDIVISIONS: 1968 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER OF BIRTHS 



BIRTH RATES 



(1) 



TOTAL 



WHITE NONWHITE 



TOTAL WHITE 



NONWHITE 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



68,407 52,955 



15,452 



18.2 



17.0 



23.9 



1,266 


1,244 


22 


4,974 


4,305 


669 


16,714 


7,206 


9,508 


9,425 


9,067 


358 


405 


187 


218 


309 


205 


104 


1,086 


1,049 


37 


1,081 


985 


96 


1,001 


627 


374 


479 


254 


225 


1,442 


1,301 


141 


386 


385 


1 


2,056 


1,836 


220 


861 


770 


91 


245 


166 


79 


7,797 


7,287 


510 


14,028 


12,253 


1,775 


233 


166 


67 


1,131 


887 


244 


236 


120 


116 


319 


214 


105 


1,695 


1,636 


59 


800 


564 


236 


438 


241 


197 



14.6 


14.6 


17.3 


17.2 


18.6 


14.3 


15.9 


15.8 


20.9 


16.5 


15.7 


13.0 


16.9 


17.0 


20.4 


19.7 


23.5 


21.9 


16.4 


12.6 


16.8 


16.1 


16.4 


16.4 


19.0 


18.6 


15.6 


15.3 


15.5 


13.9 


16.7 


16.3 


22.8 


22.3 


13.1 


12.6 


25.7 


24.8 


12.1 


9.8 


14.4 


13.0 


15.7 


15.6 


15.0 


13.6 


16.7 


13.8 



16. 
18, 
24. 
19, 
27, 



26.8 
14.9 
30.6 
26.6 
25.0 

26.7 

22.9 
19.0 
20.4 



25 

27, 
14, 
29 



16.0 

18.1 
18.2 
19.6 
22.5 



CD 



Per 1,000 population. 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 10. 



18- 



15 ABSOLUTE DIVORCES AND ANNULMENTS BY LEGAL GROUNDS FOR DECREE AND POLITICAL 

SUBDIVISION OF OCCURRENCE: 1968 





ABSOLUTE 


DIVORCES § 


ANNULMENTS 




LEGAL GROUNDS 








LITICAL 






ABSOLUTE 


ANNUL- 


VOLUNTARY 






all(D 


NOT 


BDIVISION 


TOTAL 


DIVORCES 


MENTS 


SEPARATION 


DESERTION 


ADULTERY 


OTHER 


STATED 


ryland 


S 


,151 


8 


,060 


91 


4 


,673 


2,003 


1,154 


215 


106 


leg any 




206 




205 


1 




69 


57 


73 


6 


1 


ne Arundel 




500 




489 


11 




297 


102 


70 


17 


14 


ltimore City 


2 


,807 


2 


,776 


31 


1 


,695 


773 


247 


78 


14 


ltimore 


1 


,041 


1 


,030 


11 




518 


288 


161 


25 


49 


lvert 




18 




18 


- 




10 


5 


1 


2 


- 


roline 




41 




41 


_ 




23 


11 


5 


_ 


2 


rroll 




89 




88 


1 




51 


15 


17 


2 


4 


cil 




119 




117 


2 




53 


30 


33 


2 


1 


arles 




51 




51 


- 




30 


14 


6 


1 


- 


r Chester 




84 




84 


- 




64 


12 


8 


- 


- 


sderick 




165 




164 


1 




104 


16 


41 


3 


1 


rrett 




31 




30 


1 




9 


13 


8 


1 


- 


rford 




171 




170 


1 




78 


50 


32 


5 


6 


vard 




43 




43 


- 




26 


9 


5 


3 


- 


it 




41 




41 


- 




21 


10 


10 


- 


- 


it g ornery 




754 




749 


5 




491 


159 


75 


21 


8 


Lnce George 's 


1 


,183 


1 


,172 


11 




693 


307 


152 


27 


4 


3en Anne's 




26 




25 


1 




9 


12 


4 


1 


- 


, Mary ' s 




114 




112 


2 




63 


20 


28 


3 


- 


lerset 




64 




63 


1 




35 


13 


15 


1 


- 


Lbot 




66 




65 


1 




38 


16 


11 


1 


_ 


(jhington 




285 




278 


7 




143 


47 


83 


11 


1 


|:omico 




208 




206 


2 




124 


19 


60 


4 


1 


pcester 




44 




43 


1 




29 


5 


9 


1 


- 



Includes incurable insanity, impotence, imprisonment for conviction of a felony, and 
any cause which renders a marriage null and void from the beginning. All annulments 
are included. 



iirce 



Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics and 
Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 61. 



•19- 



NO. 16 SELECTED MORTALITY DATA BY RACE, MARYLAND AND THE UNITED STATES: 1966-1968 





DEATH RATES ^ 




TOTAL 


WHITE 


NON WHITE 


YEAR 


MARYLAND 


UNITED STATES 


MARYLAND UNITED STATES 


MARYLAND 


UNITED STATES 


1968 
1967 
1966 


8.7 
8.4 
8.8 


9.6 P 

9.4 
9.5 


P 
8.4 9.6 

8.2 9.4 

8.4 9.5 


10.0 

9.4 

10.4 


P 
9.9 

9.4 

9.7 



INFANT DEATH RATES PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS 



(2) 



968 


21.5 


21.7 


967 


22.2 


22.4 


966 


23.2 


23.7 



18.0 


NA 


33.6 


NA 


19.1 


19.7 


32.6 


35.9 


19.2 


20.6 


37.4 


38.8 



NEONATAL DEATH RATES PER 1,000 LIVE BIRTHS 



(3) 



1968 


16.3 


15.9 


1967 


16.8 


16.5 


1966 


17.6 


17.2 



14.4 


NA 


22.8 


NA 


14.7 


15.0 


24.4 


23.8 


15.0 


15.6 


26.6 


24.8 



P - Preliminary 
NA - Not Available 



(1) 



Death rates are per 1,000 population. 



(2) 



Death occurring to a person under one year. 



(3) 



Death occurring to a person under 28 days 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report 1968," p. 67. 



■20- 



00 



Q 
2 

< 

X 

DC 



u 



Q 

< 

X 
PJ 
CO 



CO 

P4 
CO 

u 
2 



PJ 

X 
E- 
2 

w 



X 
oa 

CO 

E- 

< 

Q 



UJ 



< 

2 OS 

O UJ 

i-h 03 

E- 
< 



> 

CU 
OS 



PJ E~ X 

H CO H 

2 i-h oo 

i— i ! — a ^ — ' 



DC 

o 

ul, 



o 

2 



LO 

i — I 

r^ 

CM 



to 



o 

LO 
LO 



CM 

LO 
LO 



LO 
CM 



00 



Ot 

LO 

cm 
to 



LO 


t/i 

u 



o 

LO 



o 



LO 



H I/) N O <J 
Ot 0O CM i— I CM 
tO CM ■— I i— I i— I 



i— ( H O CM LO 
00 Cn i— I Cn v£> 
LO CM to 1—1 r— I 



O <* H N Tf 

o t^ ^r cn <— i 

CM ^H "=3- tO CM 



^O 



o 



CM i— I 



at oo oo <* i— i 
cn cn cm \o oo 

vo oo en n- to 



>— i en oo cm oo 
en lo vo o to 

LO "^f LO LO to 



o to o 

tO VO CM 



cm cm en 
en to ^r 



i-i *3- i^ 

00 \0 oo 
to i— I 



en en v£> 

^r i-h ■>* 

CM tO to 



■— i r-- r^ 

i— I CM O 
LO CM i— ( 



to 

en 



to 



H CO vO oo ^ 
N^f O W 00 
00 \D 00 i—l 00 



CM 0O CM 

LO N O 
00 vO LO 



LO CM 



"5fr 

O 

CM 

O 

oo en en oo 

en cm o to 

to ^r cm "=t 

i i i i 

o o o o 

en -— i <3- 

tO "3" ■— I 



i 

en 



o 

_ o o 

to oo r-- 

tj- w «* 



00 

i 

^c to 

t^ en 

« i 

CM O <— < O 

r-~ lo r^ en 

r-~ cm lo <* 



03 


X 

<+-! 
O 

LO 

L0 

o3 

lo 



L0 

03 



lo lo 

e -h 

L0 Q 
OS 

.-I ^ 
P o3 
O --" 
3 

2 O 
lo 

+-> 05 

C > 
o) O 

&X) 

•H 

—I U 
03 <D 

S U 



03 
o3 +-> 

•H ^ 

C O 
O 2 

3 «-!— I 

0) o 

e 

CL, L0 

<u 

uTT I/) 
o3 
LO 03 CJ 
+-) t-J 

c c c 

0. -H 
-d 3 o3 



to 
X 3 

O +-» 

C -H 
03 ^H 
<4H ,-H 

C 0) 



X lo 

i— I 



oj 
E 

L0 
X 



to 

CM 



vO 



O O O 

cm to ^r 



CM vO O 
<sf- o to 

CM i—l i— I 



to O LO 
00 LO o 
i-H CM CM 



lo r-» vo 

vO ■—< tJ- 

CM t—l i— I 



i-H 


^o 


o 


en oo 


vD vO 


1— 1 


i— ( LO 


to O LO 


to 


00 


00 


00 to 


lo "d- 


** 


lo en 


O 00 ^ 


to 


o 


CM 


i-H CM 


\D LO 


to 


•<* to 


CM CM CM 



00 N H 

vo en en 

*3" to to 



c 



en 

LO 

en oo 

cq «* 

i ^~ 

o 

LO 

en 

UJ 



i 






tO Tf CM tO CM 



O) 



00 



"* vO ^ vO M LO O 

en to lo cm to cm i-h 



o to -3- r-~ \o o i-h 
to o CM "3" to ^- \Q 



Tt N N vO (N Oi LO 
i-H ^f \£) LO VO r~~- VO 



O "3" 



i-h oo en ^t- o 
lo t^- lo ^ r~- 



00 tO i-H CM LO •<* L0 

o oo cm oo en o r~- 

tO i-H i-H ,— I 



00 t^- CM O "3" 00 LO 

iO CM h VD LOt H; 
tO tO i— I i— I i— I i-H i— I 



oo 

en en 
m lo 

o I 

vO 

en 

UJ 



L0 

OJ L0 



+-> 

u 
< 



to 

o 

cn r-{ tt to en 

i— i o oo to to 

O ^f LO LO CM 

II « I I I 

O O O O i-H o 

*3- t— < o 00 tO i— I 

r^ o "3- lo lo cm 



L0 

03 

i-H 
Ph 

o 



O C|_| 



4J 

o 

-s 

C -H 



< HH U -H Q 



> JZ 
•H CI, 

-J E 
PJ 

Mh 

o « 

L0 
LO -H 
■H +-> 
L0 -H 
O X 

^ ex 

!h O 4-> 

•H 5h LO 

uto< 



^ CI, 

O 03 

u 

L0 

CD oj 

L0 

03 « 

CD L0 

LO OJ 



rt 



t/i 

o 

?H 

Oj 

^H 

o 

L0 -H t— I CD 

O CD Q O T3 

•H T3 -H -H 

?H -H ?H fH CJ 



L0 

E 
u 

L0 O 

CD PL, 



03 i-H 

E <C 
O 

c » 

< L0 



LO 
LO 






to 



00 
vD 



L0 

• H 

oo 
O 

u 

CD 



OS- 
LO 

E 

L0 

o3 

U -H 

o o 

L0 i-H CD 
H 3 2 



OJ O OJ 

■P -H X +-» 
^ 3 ■)-> *H 



< co o < x: 



00 CD 

c -2 

O 3 



fH U 

p p 

X OJ 
X 2 



•H 100 
4-) -H 
P C 
CD CD 

O CQ 



O 
LO 

to 

LO 

LO 
I 

o 

LO 
LO 



I 

O 
U 

3 ■-• 

4-> o3 

03 C 



-O L0 

OJ 

•H +-> 

MH C 

• H l-H 

O 

u!7 

P, 

to 03 

C -H 



O 

3 
Jh 
+-» 

L0 



■-H CM tO "* LO v£> 



r^ oo en 



O i-H CM 



to "3- lo \D t^- oo cn 



o 

CM 



03 



o3 

3 

C 
C 
< 



L0 

?H 

O 

o 


DC 



03 

•M 

•H 
> 

C 
03 

L0 

o 



03 

■P 

CO 

LlH 

o 

c 
o 

•H 
L0 

•H 
> 

•H 
Q 





C 


•H 
W) 
X 

x: 



oj 
+-> 
C 




T3 

C • 
oS oo 

CM 

x: 
+j 

■—I p. 

o3 

r 

S * 

00 

HH \D 

o cn 



c - 

4-> 
E fH 

+-> O 
!h p 
03 

pa: 



Q LO 
CJ 

TJ -H 

C +-> 

o3 LO 

■-H .H 

X +-> 

!h a3 

03 +-> 

2 CO 




O 

^H 

3 
O 
CO 



-21 



NO. 18 



DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY RACE FOR MARYLAND AND POLITICAL 

SUBDIVISIONS: 1968 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER OF DEATHS 



DEATH RATES 



(1) 



TOTAL 



WHITE NONWHITE 



TOTAL WHITE NONWHITE 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



32,596 26,102 



6,494 



8.7 



8.4 



10.0 



1,020 


1 


,009 


11 


11.8 


11.8 


8.4 


1,844 


1 


,555 


289 


6.4 


6.2 


8.0 


11,769 


7 


,444 


4,325 


13.1 


14.7 


11.0 


4,513 


4 


,362 


151 


7.6 


7.6 


8.3 


189 




120 


69 


9.8 


10.6 


8.6 


270 




223 


47 


13.8 


14.2 


12.1 


612 




583 


29 


9.5 


9.4 


11.6 


415 




375 


40 


7.8 


7.5 


12.7 


301 




192 


109 


7.1 


6.7 


7.8 


409 




290 


119 


14.0 


14.4 


13.2 


742 




667 


75 


8.6 


8.3 


14.2 


207 




207 


- 


8.8 


8.8 


- 


660 




586 


74 


6.1 


5.9 


7.7 


331 




291 


40 


6.0 


5.8 


8.4 


217 




160 


57 


13.7 


13.4 


14.7 


2,918 


2 


,762 


156 


6.2 


6.2 


7.8 


3,201 


2 


,860 


341 


5.2 


5.2 


5.3 


208 




162 


46 


11.7 


12.3 


10.1 


294 




220 


74 


6.7 


6.2 


8.9 


273 




190 


83 


14.1 


15.6 


11.5 


305 




227 


78 


13.7 


13.8 


13.5 


997 




958 


39 


9.2 


9.2 


12.0 


617 




456 


161 


11.6 


11.0 


13.4 


284 




203 


81 


10.8 


11.6 


9.3 



(1) 



Per 1,000 population. 



Source: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Division of Statistics 
and Vital Records, "Annual Vital Statistics Report, 1968," p. 26. 



-22- 



STATE HOSPITALS FOR THE MENTALLY ILL 

In 1969 Maryland's hospitals for the mentally ill again treated a 
record number of patients, reflecting primarily the continuing rise in admis- 
sions of alcoholics. In 1959, 15,853 patients were treated at these facilities, 
and in 1969, 25,541 patients were treated, an increase of 61.1 per cent. How- 
ever, due to shortened periods of hospitalization of new admissions and the 
gradual continuing decrease in the number of long term patients, the average 
daily size of the patient population declined 16.8 per cent during this time 
period, from 8,952 to 7,451. 

It is generally believed that the rate of occurrence of most mental 
illnesses has not changed appreciably and that these expanding figures reflect 
the growing acceptance and usage of psychiatric hospitals and clinics for the 
short term intensive treatment of alcoholism and acute psychoneurotic and per- 
sonality disturbances. 



■23- 



NO. 19 



PATIENT POPULATION, STATE HOSPITALS FOR THE 
MENTALLY ILL: FISCAL YEARS, 1969, 1967, 
1963, 19S9 



FISCAL YEAR 



AVERAGE SIZE OF TOTAL NUMBER 
PATIENT POPULATION TREATED 



ADMISSIONS 



TOTAL 
SEPARATIONS 



1969 
1967 
1963 
1959 



7,451 
8,006 
8,218 
8,952 



25,541 


14,085 


14,130 


22,899 


11,091 


11,298 


18,726 


7,257 


7,173 


15,853 


4,164 


4,367 



Per Cent Change 
1969/1967 - 6.9 

1969/1959 -16.8 



11.5 
61.1 



27.0 
238.3 



25.1 
223.6 



Source: Maryland Department of Mental Hygiene, Statistics Newsletter X-7, 
Fact Sheet for 1969 Fiscal Year. 



24- 



EDUCATION 

Education has stood in the spotlight of publicity throughout this decade. 
Maryland ranks sixth among the states in percentage increase in public school 
enrollment in the period 1957-58 to 1967-68. In 1967 there were nearly 826,000 
pupils enrolled in the State's public schools, a figure representing an increase 
of 23.7 per cent since 1962. The cost per pupil on a statewide basis has 
climbed to $628, and the number of pupils per teacher and principal has de- 
clined to 20.5. 

Public high schools in Maryland graduated more than 41,000 students in 
1966, an increase of 73.5 per cent over 1960. And, significantly, a larger 
number of these graduates go on to colleges and universities. Virtually 40 per 
cent of the 1966 graduating classes continued into higher education statewide. 
The percentage of graduates continuing education at the degree granting institu- 
tions varies from more than 66 per cent in Montgomery County to a low of slightly 
over 18 per cent in Garrett County. Fourteen of the 24 political subdivisions 
showed a figure in excess of 30 per cent for that year. 

It is estimated that 12,749 day students were enrolled in the Fall 1968 
term in Maryland's 18 two year colleges. At the same time, if one includes 
evening and part time students, 27,156 students were enrolled at the two year 
colleges. The 30 four year colleges and universities in the State compiled a 
full time undergraduate enrollment during the day in excess of 54,000. Added to 
this figure are the more than 38,000 part time students and the 18,265 graduate 
students, bringing the total to over 126,000 students enrolled in higher educa- 
tion institutions in Maryland. 

The largest institution of higher education in the State is the University 
of Maryland. Total student enrollment there is nearly 47,000, representing over 
37 per cent of the higher education enrollment in Maryland. 



■25- 



NO. 20 NUMBER OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 

FALL 1969 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



TOTAL 



ELEMENTARY 



SECONDARY 



COMBINED 



(1) 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



1,275 



927 



37 


27 


94 


75 


205 


152 


151 


107 


13 


11 


10 


6 


25 


16 


24 


16 


23 


14 


20 


16 


33 


23 


19 


15 


38 


27 


26 


15 


8 


4 


180 


134 


219 


167 


12 


8 


23 


16 


17 


10 


13 


10 


44 


30 


24 


16 


17 


12 



279 



69 



7 


3 


18 


1 


45 


8 


40 


4 


1 


1 


4 





5 


4 


6 


2 


4 


5 


4 





7 


3 


2 


2 


9 


2 


5 


6 


1 


3 


42 


4 


51 


1 


2 


2 


3 


4 


3 


4 


2 


1 


7 


7 


6 


2 


5 






Includes Middle and other schools. 
Source: Unpublished data furnished by the Maryland State Department of Education, 



-26- 



NO. 21 ENROLLMENT IN PUBLIC AND NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS, MARYLAND: 1967, 1966, 1962^ 



PER CENT CHANGE 



TYPE OF SCHOOL 1967 1966 1962 1966/1967 1962/1967 

Total Public and Nonpublic 936,906 932,128 803,124 3.4 20.0 

Public 

Kindergarten 
Elementary (1-8) 
Secondary 

Nonpublic 

Kindergarten 
Elementary (1-8) 
Secondary 

Campus Schools (State Colleges) 1,040 1,105 1,154 - 5.9 - 9.9 

lunior Colleges 
Public 
Private 

Fall of each year stated. 
Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Education in Maryland," 1968 



825,892 


790,928 


667,528 


4.4 


23.7 


42,391 


34,574 


25,731 


22.6 


64.7 


437,367 


423,570 


361,453 


3.3 


21.0 


346,134 


332,784 


280,344 


4.0 


23.5 


138,014 


141,200 


135,596 


- 2.3 


1.8 


7,759 


9,130 


7,093 


-15.0 


9.4 


99,636 


102,695 


102,651 


- 3.0 


- 2.9 


30,619 


29,375 


25,852 


4.2 


18.4 



21,186 


18,097 


8,565 


17.1 


147.4 


20,374 


17,294 


8,200 


17.8 


148.5 


812 


803 


365 


1.1 


122.5 



•27- 



co 
o 

c 

4 
O 

CD 



P 

4 



CO 
rt 
P 
r+ 
(D 

O 

cd 
P 

r+ 

3 
cd 

rt 

O 
H) 

m 

c 
o 
p 

rt 



03 



o 

Hi 

cd 
P 
o 



p 

Cu X 

p 

4 



era 

< 

cd 

3 



O 
4 

o 

iD 
l/l 

c+ 

rD 
4 



=£ H 

P 03 
t/3 h- ' 

=r cr 

H- O 

3 rt 
0Q 
rt 
O 

3 



co co,o 

O r+ C 

3 • CD 
CD CD 

4 2 3 

(/) 03 

S3 g- 

- 3 

(/) n> 



T3 2 


?N 


K 


ac 


o 


T1 


a 


n 


n 


n 


n 


n 


DO 


no 


> > 


s 


4 O 


CD 


o 


p 


p 


4 


o 


3 s 


o 


p 


p 


p 


P 


P 


3 t- 


p 


H- 3 


3 


-<. 


4 


4 


CD 


4 


CD 


n 


4 


4 


i— ' 


h- ' 


»— ■ 


3 t- 


4 


3 rt 


r+ 


p 


Hi 


4 


CL 


O 


4 


H- 


4 


O 


< 


rt 


rt 


CD CD 


^< 


O (TO 




4 


O 


CD 


CD 


3* 


h- 1 


(— 1 


o 


i— ' 


CD 


H- 


H- 


era 


t— • 


CD O 




a 


4 


r+ 


4 


CD 


CB 




i— ■ 


H- 


4 


3 


3 


> p 


P 


3 






a 


rt 


H- 


(/) 


W 




h- ' 


3 


r+ 


O 


O 


4 3 


3 


CD CD 










o 


c+ 








CD 




4 


4 


C X 


CL 


CD H 










?r 


CD 












n> 


CD 


3 




O X 












4 
















O- 




4 


























n 


CD 




ffQ 


























H- 


t— ' 




CD 


























rt 






- 


























X 







I— ' N) 

ON NJ CM -Pi 

sl s] h-> 4^ 

sl -Pi N) 00 

ON ON N) CM 



4^ <0 



CM t— ' 
4s, on On 



Ji. CM ON .p* O 

00 <~D O On ►— ' 
|i O W (O W 



I— ' NJ 1— ' 

w w ^ yi vj 

ON O <£> CM <0 

CM sl 4i» 4^> O 

On oo t— > i— i cn 



On O 



Cm On 



in sj sj oo NJ 
O On O On On 
m Ui O Ji Ul 



T3 
O 



H 
I — i 

n 

CO 

c 
ca 
a 
i— i 
< 
i — i 

CO 

i — i 
o 





y- • 


i—' 






00 




i — i 


ID 


ON 


h- < 


NJ 


on 


CO 


NJ 


N) 


ON 

■P=> 


Cn 


N) 


w 


On 


h- ' 


00 


00 


m 


4^ 


^1 


4> 


tO 


-p- 


a> 


on 


cn 


00 


NJ 



ON 



o 

3 



m 

Cl 
C 
o 
P 

rt- 



I— ' NJ 
On NJ t— ' 4^ 

CM 4^ to Cn 

ifi anoto 
si to h o^ 



-P^ 00 



IsJ t- 1 
A W H 



4i» 00 N) 4^ I— ' 
CM K) K) 00 CM 

U © 1) ON si 



CM 



n> »— > 

CM Cn si 



Cn cn cn O CM 
si CM N) ON to 

si ON O 4^ CM 



ON O I— ' CM Cn 

Ul O NJ K) O 

CM 4^ I— ' CM O 

si 4^ Cn oo cn 





i— ' 


(— ' 






s] 




i—i 


«3 


Cn 


(— ' 


VO 


Cn 


N) 


N> 


ID 


ON 

Cn 


o 


N) 


oo 


w 


CM 


NO 


ro 


cn 


1 — 1 


ID 


CM 


N3 


W 


ON 


M 


h- ■ 


O 


00 



to 

ON 
ON 



P 

4 

P 

3 













































H^ 






ON 




^- J 


NJ 










00 


to 






i — i 




>—• 






I— 1 


I— 1 






lO 


co 


J> 


i— 1 


ON 


Cn 


O 


o 


4^ 


4^ 


ON 


C-J 


i— ' 


NJ 


CM 


co 


co 


£i 


Cn 


ON 


CO 


o 


I— 1 


-Pi 


4^ 


ON 


o 


si 


ON 


s] 


s] 


•o 


4^ 


CM 


-P^ 


o> 


ID 


lO 


Cn 


-Pi 


to 


i — i 


co 


h- ' 


N) 


1 — 1 


>— ' 


4^ 


ON 


si 


t -J 


o 


'ON 


ON 


On 


si 


1 — 1 


■*sl 


O 


h- 1 


'./J 


CO 


'O 


CM 


I—" 


on 


s] 


ro 


s] 


00 


CJN 


ON 


i — i 


00 


4^ 


1— ' 


0-J 


w 


-Pi 


N) 


CM 


ON 


'ON 


s] 


ON 


co 


'O 


to 


ON 


Cn 


on 


on 


£» 


N) 


CM 


CTn 


-Pi 


h- ' 


o 


4^ 


ON 


NJ 


CO 


CM 


00 



<o 

ON 

NJ 



to 

ON 

00 



cn N) cn 

tO CM t— ■ to 



ON 00 O 4^ 
CM 00 Cn -pi 



I— • CM ON Cn N) 
ON 4i- O Cn to 



tO 

ON 
ON 



sl 4^. 4i» Cn 
Cn N) CM si N) 



h-> -pi 4i> -Pi 
N) tO N) sl Cn 4^ 



tO 

ON 
Sl 



m 

n 
m 
z 

H 

n 



sl ON w *■ 
CM 00 t— ■ ►— 



45>. t— ' ON N) 
i— • t— • cn on Cn 



Cn cn £i .pi .pi 



4i W H H 
ON On sl O 00 



Cn O N> s] O 



CM h- ' N) I— ' 

W H Ul H W 



Cn oo 



Cn Cn 



l— ' N) CM 

t— > CM sl O >— ' 



4i. o O cn N> 



N) 
CM 



CJ 

m 



to 

ON 
Sl 



■28- 



NO. 23 AVERAGE NUMBER OF PUPILS BELONGING PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL, 

MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1968-1969 SCHOOL YEAR 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



TOTAL 



ELEMENTARY 



SECONDARY 



Maryland 



20.5 



22.5 



18.3 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



21, 
21, 
21, 
19, 



22.2 



24.1 
21.9 
25.2 
21.3 
24.2 



19.2 
20.5 
18.2 
18.2 
19.9 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



20.0 
20.0 
20.3 
20.9 
21.9 



23.1 
21.8 
21.9 
23.1 
24.8 



17.2 
18.2 
18.7 
18.3 
19.4 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 



20, 

22 

20, 

19, 

19 



21.7 
24.4 
21.0 
24.3 
27.3 



18.7 
19.7 
19.0 
15.8 
13.7 



Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St . Mary ' s 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



19.6 
19.6 
18.8 
21.2 
22.2 

19.2 
21.8 
20.9 
20.5 



20.8 
21.1 

24.0 
25.8 
25.5 



23, 

25, 
23, 
22. 



18.3 
17.8 
14.8 
16.7 
19.2 

16.0 
18.8 
18.0 
18.6 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by Maryland State Department of Education 



29- 



NO. 24 ALL ELEMENTARY AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS AND 

PRINCIPALS IN MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 

FALL 1967, FALL 1964 



TOTAL TEACHERS $ PRINCIPALS 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



1967 



1964 PER CENT CHANGE 1964/1967 



Maryland 



37,931 



30,649 



Allegany 




743 


686 


Anne Arundel 


2 


,919 


2,320 


Baltimore City 


8 


,026 


6,893 


Baltimore 


5 


,775 


4,892 


Calvert 




242 


223 


Caroline 




245 


220 


Carroll 




694 


547 


Cecil 




519 


448 


Charles 




502 


396 


Dorchester 




281 


268 


Frederick 




873 


741 


Garrett 




222 


202 


Harford 




608 


458 


Kent 




179 


168 


Montgomery 


5 


,571 


4,407 


Prince George's 


6 


,378 


4,402 


Queen Anne's 




230 


185 


St. Mary's 




414 


324 


Somerset 




197 


193 


Talbot 




216 


188 


Washington 


1 


,011 


853 


Wicomico 




581 


511 


Worcester 




317 


255 



23.8 

8.3 
25.8 
16.4 
18.0 

8.5 

11.4 
26.9 

15.8 

26.8 

4.9 

17.8 
9.9 

32.8 
6.5 

26.4 
44.9 
24.3 
27.8 
2.1 

14.9 
18.5 
13.7 
24.3 



Source: Maryland Department of Education, "Education in Maryland," 1968, 
Maryland State Department of Education, "Annual Report" 1965. 



30- 



NO. 25 COST PER PUPIL BELONGING, CURRENT EXPENSES, MARYLAND PUBLIC DAY SCHOOLS, 

BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1967-1968 SCHOOL YEAR 



PER CENT RECEIVED 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION TOTAL FROM STATE 

Maryland $ 628 35.8 

Allegany 566 41.4 

Anne Arundel 562 41.0 

Baltimore City 612 38.6 

Baltimore 643 30.1 

Calvert 563 55.8 

Caroline 561 59.0 

Carroll 549 42.2 

Cecil 557 44.8 

Charles 626 42.8 

Dorchester 575 46.4 

Frederick 627 35.0 

Garrett 482 62.6 

Harford 568 43.4 

Howard 596 34.2 

Kent 596 38.0 

Montgomery 763 28.4 

Prince George's 624 30.9 

Queen Anne's 595 44.6 

St. Mary's 555 51.0 

Somerset 470 65.8 

Talbot 608 34.3 

Washington 612 42.7 

Wicomico 540 45.1 

Worcester 536 38.6 

Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Education in Maryland," 1968, 



-31- 



NO. 26 



AVERAGE SALARY PER TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL, MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 
BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS: 1968-1969 SCHOOL YEAR 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



ALL PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ELEMENTARY 



SECONDARY 



TOTAL 



PRIN- 
CIPALS 



TEA- 
CHERS 



TOTAL 



PRIN- 
CIPALS 



TEA- 
CHERS 



TOTAL 



PRIN- 
CIPALS 



Mary 1 and 



$8,745 $14,870 $8,646 $8,620 $14,700 $8,268 $9,307 $15,124 



Allegany 


8,799 


11,976 


8,635 


8,670 


10,327 


8,539 


8,910 


15,512 


8,7 


Anne Arundel 


8,100 


13,315 


7,851 


7,740 


12,669 


7,424 


8,572 


15,237 


8,3! 


Baltimore City 


9,061 


14,405 


8,801 


8,775 


14,789 


8,445 


9,400 


13,762 


9,2. 


Baltimore 


8,984 


16,702 


8,570 


8,687 


16,843 


8,159 


9,281 


16,493 


8,9 


Calvert 


8,248 


12,812 


7,994 


8,524 


12,271 


8,208 


7,946 


14,615 


7,7" 


Caroline 


7,853 


13,098 


7,579 


7,635 


12,079 


7,423 


8,072 


13,971 


7,7. 


Carroll 


7,571 


12,855 


7,321 


6,684 


13,489 


6,364 


8,526 


12,178 


8,3! 


Cecil 


8,069 


13,999 


7,730 


7,909 


13,857 


7,519 


8,215 


14,150 


7,9 


Charles 


8,168 


15,450 


7,811 


8,023 


14,438 


7,680 


8,311 


16,632 


7,9 


Dorchester 


8,198 


10,633 


8,065 


7,988 


9,681 


7,904 


8,404 


11,378 


8,2 


Frederick 


7,826 


12,749 


7,553 


7,650 


12,020 


7,330 


8,001 


14,093 


7,7 


Garrett 


7,749 


9,739 


7,576 


7,614 


9,405 


7,369 


7,749 


11,075 


7,6 


Harford 


8,275 


12,523 


8,115 


8,143 


13,352 


7,968 


8,496 


11,457 


8,3i 


Howard 


8,884 


13,870 


8,585 


8,738 


13,293 


8,419 


9,203 


14,492 


8,7 


Kent 


7,104 


11,492 


6,851 


7,095 


10,507 


6,857 


7,113 


12,916 


6,8 


Montgomery 


10,463 


17,180 


10,134 


10,101 


16,997 


9,720 


10,83C 


17,415 


10,5 


Prince George's 


8,925 


16,080 


8,562 


8,502 


15,941 


8,098 


9,468 


16,289 


9,1 


Queen Anne's 


7,106 


11,474 


6,861 


6,848 


10,994 


6,555 


7,303 


12,033 


7,0 


St. Mary's 


7,757 


11,573 


7,485 


7,472 


10,369 


7,253 


8,048 


12,950 


7,7 


Somerset 


7,984 


10,198 


7,774 


7,811 


9,708 


7,584 


8,157 


9,999 


7,9 


Talbot 


7,810 


12,409 


7,629 


7,725 


11,409 


7,585 


7,883 


13,210 


7,6 


Washington 


8,903 


12,122 


8,749 


8,484 


10,967 


8,360 


10,052 


13,268 


9,1 


Wicomico 


8,322 


11,620 


8,142 


8,206 


11,147 


8,050 


8,447 


12,105 


8,2 


Worcester 


7,315 


10,175 


7,166 


7,538 


9,278 


7,455 


7,535 


10,916 


7,3 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by the Maryland State Department of Education, 



32- 



NO. 27 



SOURCE OF CURRENT FUNDS AND DISBURSEMENTS, MARYLAND 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS: SCHOOL YEAR 1967-1968 



INCOME SOURCE OR 
DISBURSEMENT 



AMOUNT 
($) 



PER CENT OF TOTAL 



Income Source 

Federal Funds 
State Funds 
Local Funds 

Disbursements 

Instruction 

Maintenance and Operation 

Other*- 1 -* 

Pupil Transportation 
Administration 



$ 52,795,197 
194,941,110 
297,136,078 

$386,305,495 
62,682,747 

55,905,743 
19,804,524 
12,717,643 



9.7 
35.8 
54.5 



71.8 
11.7 

10.4 

3.7 
2.4 



CD 



Includes fixed charges, outgoing transfers, pupil personnel services, health 
services, food services, student body activities, community services, school 
lunch and special milk, teachers retirement and social security. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education, "Education in Maryland," 1968. 



-33- 



NO. 2 8 CAPITAL OUTLAY EXPENDITURES, MARYLAND PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES, BY 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1968-1969 SCHOOL YEAR 













ADMINISTRATION 


COMMUN 


POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


ELEMENTARY 


HIGH 


BUILDINGS 


COLLEG 


Maryland 


$151,498,218 


$53,557,178 


$82,057,085 


$2,789,500 


$13,094 


Allegany 


6,050,886 


63,366 


1,422,396 


_ 


4,565 


Anne Arundel 


11,919,212 


4,898,687 


6,769,680 


180,007 


70 


Baltimore City 


22,405,176 


7,048,829 


14,054,547 


723,558 


578 


Baltimore 


17,025,646 


5,819,379 


7,934,766 


798,364 


2,473 


Calvert 


145,481 


35,062 


105,690 


4,729 




Caroline 


1,025,856 


12,122 


1,006,873 


6,861 




Carroll 


1,672,449 


859,423 


783,989 


29,037 




Cecil 


3,712,232 


715,717 


2,983,099 


- 


13 


Charles 


10,256,166 


1,489,200 


7,417,742 


- 


1,349 


Dorchester 


130,068 


45,843 


83,625 


600 




Frederick 


3,792,733 


1,170,337 


2,477,756 


126,425 


18 


Garrett 


1,005,506 


532,228 


392,280 


- 


80 


Harford 


4,562,187 


2,411,411 


1,964,361 


2,135 


184 


Howard 


7,578,560 


953,062 


3,639,124 


75,975 


2,910 


Kent 


932,186 


659,310 


264,223 


8,653 




Montgomery 


21,480,043 


10,306,280 


10,117,072 


458,072 


598 


Prince George's 


30,341,200 


14,395,961 


15,584,599 


156,874 


203 


Queen Anne's 


139,243 


5,553 


111,986 


- 


21 


St. Mary's 


1,435,646 


232,869 


1,178,468 


24,309 




Somerset 


127,440 


108,568 


18,012 


860 




Talbot 


128,948 


32,701 


91,076 


5,171 




Washington 


3,991,778 


981,487 


2,797,109 


186,689 


26 


Wicomico 


934,110 


748,412 


184,517 


1,181 




Worcester 


705,466 


31,371 


674,095 


- 





Source: Unpublished data furnished by the Maryland State Department of Education 



-34- 







o 






v£> 






CTi 






r— 1 








f< 












CO 


LO 




oc 


vO 




_ 


CTl 




X 


i-H 




H 






o 


CT. 

i— t 


Z 






O 


CO 




t— i 


z 


O 


E- 


o 


vO 


< 


1— 1 


a> 


U 


H 


i-H 


3 


3 




a 


P 




w 


; — i 
E- 




o 


co 




z 


z 




1— ( 


l-H 




3 




LO 


z 


u 


vD 


l-H 


z 


CT 


H 


l-H 


i-H 


z 


H 




o 
u 


q: 




H 


o 




z 






UJ 


UJ 




u 


w 


vD 




OS 


vO 


OS 


13 


CT> 


PJ 


UJ 


i-H 


a, 


a 




CO 




w 


o 


H 


vO 


< 


CT, 


3 


i-H 


Q 




2 




U 




u~ 


LO 


o 


vO 




C> 


oi 


i-H 


w 




CO 




s 




3 




z 




J 


x> 


< 


vD 


E- 


CTl 


o 


i-H 


E- 




Z 




o 




l-H 




C/3 




i — i 




> 




i — i 




a 




CQ 




ZD 




CO 




hJ 




< 




u 




1 — 1 




H 




1— 1 




J 




O 






a. 





rs 



oo 



LO 

vD 



vO 



to 



v£> 



CTl 

to 



00 



CTi 

to 



i-H CTi 00 00 CT 
i-H Tj- to o to 



cm oo r-- o r-» 
i— i r~- to CTi r-H 



O iH 00 tO (N 

.-H vO to 00 CT 



M H rt N H 



CM LO LO tO O 
CM CM t-O tO CM 



tO CTi tO vO CM 



tO tO 00 CM vD 

to to CN ^r i-H 



•^t (N O VD 00 



O *=T i-H CT i— I 
tO tO tO tO CM 



<* 


CTi 


CM 


CM 


•t 


■* 


LO 


00 


LO 


CM 


CTi 


LO 


00 


CTi 


LO 


CM 


vD 


1 — 1 


*\ 




*\ 


«\ 


■* 




to 




i — I 


LO 


to 




CN 












i-H 


CM 


00 


a 


to 


Is 


to 


vO 


<* 


CT, 


to 


^ 


to 


** 


CTi 


LO 


CM 


CM 



i-H i-h cm is is 



00 to 00 LO o 
-3- 00 to LO CTi 



CM ""H; 00 CTl is 
CTi 00 00 ^T CM 



^- N N U1 0O 

^- to o *t oo 



O CTi tO CM i-H 
00 o o oo •<*- 



CM O CM CM 00 

oo oi r^ \o n 



CM \D is to i— I 

^t L/l \D LO Tf 



■-H LO 00 CTi 00 

oo ■— i is \o is 



O vO LO i-H O 
VO ^D LO LO i-H 



CM CTi CM LO to 

■* lo en is to 



"H- 00 CM vO CTi 



00 vO O CM i— I 



CTi \0 >-H «Hr vO 



is rf en oo to 

CM CM i-H i-H CM 



vD 00 CM vO CM 



cm i-H i-H r^ o 

CM i-H tO CM CM 



i-H CM i-H CM O 



CM \D 00 LO i-H 
vO tO i— I i-H to 



00 LO N <* "d- 



H h- h is CTl 
tO CM CM CM CM 



00 O LO o oo 



>i) N M- LO N 
CM i-H rt tO CM 



i-H tO CM CM LO 



CM LO i-H \D O 
\0 "<3" CM CM tO 



i-H CTi CM 00 i-H 



IO N N N o 
CM CM CM CM tO 



is oo o is i-H 

CM i-H ^" tO tO 



vO CM tO tO 00 
VD "3" CM CM CM 



vO i-H LO O *3" 
00 tO 00 CTi to 
i-H LO tO CM tO 



LO CM LO 00 ih- 
ts tO LO tO CM 
CM 00 LO "=* "«t 



CM O LO tO CTi 
\D LO CM CM -H- 
vO CM r^ tO i-H 



'H- i-H 00 00 vD 

lo o to oo en 

O tO CM LO i-H 



to 

CTi 



vO 00 CTi i-H 

CM i— I rj- O 

H 0O H N 

tO CM 



--H "H/ to CTi to 
CTi LO O LO vO 
LO 00 CM tO CM 



i-H 


to 


00 CM CM CTi 


is 


CM "H- 


00 CM 


OO 


oo 


CT 


O i-H 


CTi 


LO 


00 00 CM tO 


o 


■-H CM 


^" i-H 


CTi 


^H 


O 


00 00 


to 


to 


00 vO tO CM 


to 


00 LO 


-St "sh- 


CTl 


ro 


CN 


\Q i-H 



*0 LO 



\0 H N sj 00 
"H/ O O Is IS 
vD CTl CM tO CM 



H NN N 



VO LO 



0O i—t LO CTi 

i-H 00 O O 



LO CTi "d" Is 
CTi 00 O fO 



i-H Oi vD i— I 
O CTi CT> CTi 



CTi CM 00 



CTi tO i-H 00 
CM CM tO i-H 



\D h- [s M 



-H- [S tO l-H 

CM CM tO tO 



N vO LOiO 



vD O to O 

to to to to 



O ^J- 00 CTi 
CM CM "=* CM 
CM O "* CM 



CM O LO tO 
Is v£) CM CM 
CM <h- \Q ^ 



00 is [SO 
-h- \D Is CM 
CM tO \D tO 







>^ 


























_ 














-M 


























CO 












r-H 


•H 


























bO 


t^ 













U 


























Ph 


m. 










T3 
















Ph 












X o 


1) 


L0 




C 




C 


(D 


O 












CO 


-^ 










?H <U 


c 


•- 




O 


T3 


£2 


U 


^ 




<u 








4-> 


o 










CO CJ3 


c 


>, -M 




4J 


C 


O 


o 


•P 


c 


^H 




CO 


L0 


•H 


4-> 


TJ 






£ 


< 


Jh 




dj: 


cd 


rt < 


s 


E 


U 


•H 


i — 1 




a) 


<U 


^H 


4J 


*H 


•p 




O 




aj w 


+-> 


C 


i-H 


DO 


•H 


■ H 


ai 


i-H 


o 


1 — 1 


i-H 


X 


CO 


CO 


o 


^ 




DO O 


c 


S ?H 


O 


•H 


X 


CO CD 


+-> 


+J 


> 


O 


^H 


•H 


Ph 


o 


T3 


h 


C(H 


cd 


+-> 


-M C 


Cu 





XI 


X 


u 


^H C 


i-H 


t— 1 


i-H 


u 


■m 


o 


cd 


u 


CO 


>H 


^ 


is 


c 


C "H 





• E 


i-H 


CO 


cd 


--H C 


CCJ 


cC 


aJ 


nS 


cd 





J3 


o 


U 


aj 


03 


o 


CO 


O f-t 


3 


+-> O 


cd 


aj 


S 


< < 


0Q 


ca 


U 


U 


u 


u 


D 


a 


tu 


r w' 


X 


X 


-^ 


S ex 


C CO CO 


H 


2: 



DO 

c 

•H 
Ph 

O 



o 
o 

o 

CO 

X 
DO 




+J 

cd 

cd 
5h 
DC 

+-> 

L0 

o 

Ph 
?H 

O 

u 
o 
+-> 

cd 
U 
cd 

CL, 


Ph 


DO 




cd 

C 

o 

•H 
+-> 

cd 
o 

o 

> 

o 





cd 



co 

CTi 



-a 

c 
cd 

i-H 
^H 

cd 



C 

o 

•H 
4-> 

cd 
o 

UJ 



C 

o 

•H 
4-> 

cd 
o 

UJ 
Mh 

o 

+-> 
C 

E 
+-> 
U 
cd 

Ph 



Q 


+-> 

cd 
+j 
co 

vJ 

C 
cd 

i-H 

u 

cd 





o 
u 

o 
co 



35- 



o 
o 

=1 

rt 

H« 

3 
C 
CD 
O- 

o 

Hi 

o 



o 

s: 

H- 

TO 

t3 
P 

CD 



go 
rt 

o 

O 

tr 



CD 

O 
P 



Z 2 2 

CD O O 

4 c c 

3 3 

I — I r+ r+ 



n 3 

o o 

l—" CD 
CD 



CXI CO 
rt rt 



2 > 

73 P era 
03 H 3 

cr <>< cd 



era 

CD 



tsj CD 3 



r+ 



n 
n o 



O 03 
H i-J 
(TO X 
p I— ■ 
3 03 
3 
GO p- 

rt 

03 CO 

rt rt 

CD 03 
rt 

n CD 
O 

»— n 

i- 1 o 



3- O 

CD X 

O 



o 
— 
3 
cn 

03 

n o 

O T3 



CD 3 

OQ c/i 

i-h CD 

3 ^C 

W lsj3 



3C O Tl 

O O 4 

o c o 

a. o w 

3 d rt 

n (t a* 

O i-j c 

I— Hj 

h nw 

CD O 

rq »— 00 



tsjCra ct 
^_/CD CD 



tn n 

p o 

</> T3 

rt tO 

CD H- 

4 3 
3 

CO 

n rt 

O P 

t-' rt 

h- ' CD 



n 
o 



n n ca 

o o o 

i— ■ i— < s; 

c »— ' H- 

3 CD CD 
CTCTO 

H- (D CO 

P rt 

O p 
CHirt 

3 CD 

Z 

O 



03 DO 
P P 



o o 



CO 

O ON 



to 

O ON 



o o 



o 
o o 



o o >— 

p I— ' h- ' 

I — ' ►— ' CD 

CD Cra 

n era cd 

O CD ,— , 

HoW 

CD > i 

7Q 
CD 
/■ — \ 
ISJ 



CD 
C7Q 
CD 



< 

CD 

(/) 
rt 



K)0 tg 



o 

3 

n cd 
o 



n 

o 



CD 

era 

CD 



CD 

era 

CD 



CD 

a era 

P CD 



CD 

era cd 

CD 

oO 
Isj Hi 



3 3 
o o 

H 4 
CD CD 

nn 

CD o 

cr m 

^ H- 1 
CD CD 

s: era 

CD 

n 
o o 

» •-' Hi 

« cd n 
era o 

v — / >~i 

O 

CD 



H 
O 
rt 
P 



m 
3 

o 



3 
CD 

3 
rt 





















►— ' 




















to 


H 


cn 
















-£> 




i — i 


K) 


O 




t— • 


M 


1— 1 


(— ' 




M 


h- 1 




00 


O 


?a 
















* 




te 


* 


s# 




\m 


s# 


*» 


\# 




w 


* 




* 


H 








CM 


-£> 


N) 


to 


cn 


cm 


si 


*» 


to 


CM 


s] 


o 


cn 


h- ' 


l— 1 


to 


O 


CM 


^. to 


to 


> 


2 






o 


ON 


On 


CM 


O 


«3 


1 — 1 


co 


J> 


tsj 


cn 


Cn 


o> 


4- 


NJ 


•vj 


co 


K) 


-1^ 1— 


ON 


tr 


o 






tsj 


4^ 


4> 


ON 


si 


I— 1 


s] 


c- 


Cn 


K) 


tsj 


4^ 


CM 


NJ 


Cn 


Cn 


Cn 


CO 


to Cn 


4^ 
00 


H 


-a 
> 
















CM 




1— ' 


tsJ 


ON 




t— • 


l — i 


i — i 






h- ' 






o 


O 


H 


^> 


r- 












** 




*• 


>• 


N* 




** 


* 


»• 






v» 






V 


H 




v^ 




CM 


CM 


Isj 


to 


4i> 


to 


--4 


CM 


tsj 


-£> 


-J 


3 


to 


>— ' 


to 


to 


o 


to 


4^. to 


ON 


> 


H 


a 


H 


o 


ON 


Isj 


CM 


00 


CM 


1— ' 


CO 


h- ' 


-J 


Cn 


tsj 


to 


■F&. 


i— 1 


-4 


oo 


4- 


4^ H- 1 


CD 


t- 1 


i— i 




i — i 


tsj 


-£> 


CX3 


ON 


to 


ON 


si 


si 


si 


tsj 


isj 


i — i 


ON 


tNJ 


to 


Cn 


cn 


CM 


to Cn 


to 




2 




2 



CM 



CM 


K) 


ro 


to 


CM 


-&> 


On 


OO O 


co 


3 


ON 


K) 


CM 


cn 


cn 


4- 


4^ -t^ 


CO 


i j 


00 


cn 


CM 


cn 


Cn 


4^ 


00 o 


^1 



CM 



CM K) 


ro 


to 


CM 


-P> 


ON 


CO 


00 


CO 


O ON 


K) 


CM 


cn 


cn 


4^ 


4- 


--4 


CO 


NJ 00 


Cn 


CM 


Cn 


Cn 


-e- 


co 


to 


^1 



o o o 



CM 

W W 4^ 



CM 

CM -fe. 



ON 

O O O 00 o 



4i> cn i— i tn 
oo sj w sj oo 
m W tD nI Cn 



tO si 4^ 
si CM 00 O 



-J o to K) ON 
4iO W Nl-P> 
O 00 O cn cn 



si O iO W ON 
4^ O CM s] 4i. 
O 00 O Cn tn 



O O O O O 



00 K) 
M H ON ON si 
tsj CM ON s] 4^ 



I— ' t— » On 

W W ON OO 



sisisi rs) 

ON w H Cn to 
00 CO tO Wis) 



si slsl K) 

ON Mh tO 

00 CD tO O tsj 



Cn 
O O O CM O 



Is) W M W ON 
O Cn isj tO NO 
si ON 4^ ON CM 



Isj CM Isj 

O cn 4^ is) 
si ON O O 00 



CM O O 



ts) 

ON O 



CM 
00 

4i> O 



4i» t— ' Cn 
tO si si 

W si CO 



CM 



00 isj 
ON si 

O O O si 4^ 



4^ s] 00 

Cn to isj cn 

Cn O to 00 O 



Cn 

CM ON 
O CM si 



ISJ 

O 

O ON 



H HON 

00 si I— ■ 

O O js. ON Cn 



CM 

00 

O O Cn O O 



Cn 

4^ 



-ts 
00 



Cn 

tsj 

ON 

o 



ISJ 

tsj 



ISJ 

ON 



ISJ 

I 1 

00 



to 
cn 



tsj 

CM 

o 

tsj 
CM 



tsj 

ON 

Cn 



36- 



m 



Cn > 

tn h 
< m 

cn so 



cn 



o 
o 



ga > 

tn h 

< m 

m 73 

z z 

HH O 

z o 

o z 



T-. 



tn 



a 

CO 73 

H > 

c a 

i c 
> 

j tn 



LU 



w 



LU to 


O 


o 


c 


LO 


^r 


o 


to O 


CN 


<-r 


H *- 








Itf 


I-H 


a> 




00 


O 


vC 


< 


CO 






to 


I— 1 


to 




CM 


LO 


i— l 


:o i 


H 










•\ 




" 






Q 3 


2 










i—i 




CTi 






< H 


W 




















o£ co 


Q 




















o 






















2 


U 


o 


LO 


o 


<N 


o 


CTi 


oo o 


o 


o 


O 


2 




o 




CN 


1— 1 


r- 


LO 






LU O 


i — i 




I— 1 






t^ 


i— i 


CN 






^ ^ 


2 










■N 


* 


•> 






< 2 


LU 










1— 1 


to 


CTi 






J LU 


> 




















E- 


LU 




















Uh 






















< 


US' 





















2 O 

O 2 

O '-' 

2 2 

OS LU 



LU 
E- LU 
LL, 
< uj 



LU 



LU 



H Q E- 



J < 


C E- 


J 


a: 


3 


< 


LL, 


Q. 



Q J 

2 < 

< H 

Qi O 

U E- 



LO v£5 O vO O 
tO CTi LO 



CTi <-i 
■H- 



^ o 



LO iH O 00 O 


CTi 


W N ^- O 


tO t— 1 t— 1 v£) 


r~~ 


LO i— 1 H 


i— 1 ■— 1 00 


i— i 


t-> 



i-H to O 



o o o o o 



o o o o o 



1 — I 


r» 


vO 


Ol 


•* 


tO "vf LO 


vO 


O 


-1- 


Oi 


CM 


-r 


r— 1 


tO ^D O 


to 




LO 


to 


to 


r-- 




rt [— vD 

CM \D 
CM 


CTi 




l — 1 


r-» 


^D 


CTi 


■h- 


tO -*t LO 


vO 


o 


— 


ex. 


n 


T 


i— i 


tO \C o 


to 




L0 


to 


to 


r^ 




"d- r-- vo 

CN vO 
CM 


CTi 





*£! 


cc 


X5 


r-~ 


'sT 


CN 


en cm 


o 


r^ 


c 


CN 


<o 


r- 


i-H 


rH CM 


LO 


LO 


LO 


to 


co 




LO 


LO v£> 

to 


o, 



\Q °0 \D CN 00 

N O \D M vO 
LO LO vO CTi 00 



CM CN CN CN ** 

H O (N t/1 ^O 

\C 00 \0 "sj- i— I 

LO VO rH 

^" 1—1 



CN 


X 








^ — ' 


+-> 








T3 


•H 








c 


l/i 








a5 


H 








H 


CD 








X 


>-~s 


, — \ 




CN 


U 


•H i— 1 


CN 


f — s 




aS 


C^ 


v — / 


1 — 1 


CD 


' — v S 


IT) <D/-> 


CD 




bO 


CN 


dO-H 


H 


T3 


CD 


w t+n 


a? ^— ' 


o 


Crs 


i-H 


CD O 


i— I 


E 


as cn 


i-H / — V 


bO 


X^n bo 


•H 


i-H v — ' 


O CN 


CD 


H O CD 


■(-» 


X <D 


CJ*-^ 


h oo 


rtU h 


i-H 


H GO 


CD 


i— 1 0) 


C -H 


as 


aS <D 


T3 bO 


O rH 


•H CD O 


CQ 


S -h 


C OJ 


U i-l 


E -M U 




i—i 


aS h 


O 


<D as 


cm 


Mh O 


i— < rH 


t/> U 


CO +-> CD 


o 


O CJ 


X o 


— 


CO -P 






H U 


X (/) 


to as 


X 


X c 


as 


Ph- 


- X 4-> 


■t-> 


■M O 


S M 


CD X 


X H CO 


•H 


•H 4-> 


U 


to ^ 


H 3 


W 


W &C 


c o 


o as 


as xi C 


u 


H C 


f-t 4-> 


*"D 2 


S to o 


(D 


CD -H 


CD tO 




• H tO 


> 


> X 


•(-> T3 


• 


• -H £ 


•H 


•H (/) 


if) O 


4-> +-> 


■M aS O 


c 


C CO 


<D O 


CO CO 


CO CO E-< 


ZD 


LD S 


s s 



Du, 



CD 
4-> 

as 

> 

•H 

a. 



•H 

+-> 
■p 

H 

as 

Oh 

-o 

C 
aS 



3 

LL, 



to 



CTi 
CTi 



X 

u 

aS 

C 
aS 
•-5 



en 

CD 
•H 
+-> 
•H 

CD 

> 
•H 

g 

-a 
% 
to 

CD 
bO 
CD 



O 
U 

C 
aS 

H 

X 

^1 

a} 



T3 

CD 
■P 

•H 

-a 

o 
o 

< 
i 

CD 
•M 

aS 
4-> 

CO 



o 

•H 
■P 

aS 
o 

X! 

LU 
Ch 

O 

+-> 
C 

E 
+-> 

H 

aS 

Ph 
CD 

a 

<D 

■t-J 
as 
+-> 
CO 

C 
as 

i-H 

X 

H 

a} 





a 

I* 

O 

CO 



■37- 



NO. 31 FOUR YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MARYLAND: 1968 





COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY 


PUBLIC 
OR 
PRIVATE 


MEN (M) 
WOMEN (W) 
COED (C) 


EARNED DEGREES 
NUMBER TYPE^ 1 -* 
CONFERRED 1968 OFFERED 



Baltimore College of Commerce 

Baltimore Hebrew College 

Bowie State College 

College of Notre Dame of Maryland 

Columbia Union College 

Coppin State College 

Eastern College 

Frostburg State College 

Goucher College 

Hood College 

Johns Hopkins University 

Loyola College 

The Maryland Institute 

Maryland State College 

Morgan State College 

Mount St. Agnes College 

Mount St. Mary's College 

Ner Israel Rabbinical College 

Peabody Institute of the City of 
Baltimore 

St. John's College 

St. Joseph College 

St. Mary's College of Maryland 



Private 


C 


Private 


C 


Public 


C 


Private 


W 


Private 


c 


Public 


c 


Private 


c 


Public 


c 


Private 


w 


Private 


w 


Private 


M 


Private 


M 


Private 


c 


Public 


c 


Public 


c 


Private 


w 


Private 


M 


Private 


M 


Private 


c 


Private 


c 


Private 


w 


Public 


c 



(2) 



(3) 
(4) 



167 


A,B 





B 


100 


B 


183 


B 


176 


B 


80 


B 


182 


B,P 


361 


B,M 


281 


B,M 


116 


B 


1,602 


B,M,D,P 


451 


B,M 


150 


B,M 


100 


B 


552 


B,M 


95 


B 


237 


B 


17 


M,D. Rabb 


70 


B,M,D 


52 


B,M 


192 


B 


55 (5 > 


B 



(continued on following page) 



•38- 



NO. 31 FOUR YEAR STATE ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MARYLAND: 1968 (Cont'd) 



COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY 



PUBLIC MEN (M) EARNED DEGREES 

OR WOMEN (W) NUMBER TYPEU) 
PRIVATE COED (C) CONFERRED 1968 OFFERED 



St. Mary's Seminary § University 
Salisbury State College 
Towson State College 
University of Baltimore 
University of Maryland 
Washington College 
Western Maryland College 
Woodstock College 



Private 


M 


Public 


C 


Public 


C 


Private 


c 


Public 


c 


Private 


c 


Private 


c 


Private 


c 



(4) 



141 


B,M,D,L 


109 


B,M 


863 


B,M 


746 


A,B,M,D 


5,113 


A,B,M,D,P 


126 


B 


278 


B,M 


70 


L,M,D. 



(1) 



(2) 



(3) 



(4) 



(5) 



A-Associate 
B- Bachelor' s 
D-Doctor' s 

L-Licentiate 

P-Professional School 
M-Master' s 

Graduate School is coeducational 



Graduate, professional and evening Schools are coeducational 



Evening Classes are coeducational. 



Degrees awarded in 1968 were Associates 



Source: Maryland State Department of Education: "State-Accredited Maryland Colleges 
and Universities," January 1969. 



39- 



CO 

o 

C 
>-i 
o 
CD 



P 

I— 1 

CL 

CO 
r+ 

P 
r+ 

n> 

o 

CD 

t3 

P 

4 

r+ 

3 
CD 

3 

r+ 
O 

Hi 

tn 
Cl 

e 
o 
p 

rt 
H- 
O 

3 



CO 
r+ 
P 
r+ 
CD 

> 
O 
O 

CD 

Cl 



0) 

CL 



P 

>— ' 
pa 
3 

CL 

n 
o 



CO 

CO 
CD 
w 

P 

3 
CL 

c 

3 

< 

CD 

H 

en 



P 

3 
C 
P 
t-i 



id 

On 
CO 



X < H 



< 

P 

r+ 

CD 



c 
a" 



4 

< ►— ' H- 
CD t— 3 

HJ p H- 
P C_t p 

3 C H 



n 
o 



H- p 

CD 3 



^ o n 

CD O O 
W HH 

CD t— ' ►— • 
^-nCD CD 
fsJC/Q 0Q 
s— 'CD CD 

tsj Isj 



isj >— • to 

sj W t/1 



|SJ 

<d o 

O -P» 



o o o 



0~I I— ' 

sHOW 



Lri I— ' 

si <D Ca) 



o o o 




££ 


H 

o 




3 t— 


r+ 


n 


CD CD 


P 


o 


era 


i — ' 


tr 1 


> P 




f 


4 3 




m 


C *< 




(D 


3 




m 


cl n 






CD o 







o 3 



3 

h- n 
<-+ o 

n cd 
o era 

t— ' CD 



tsj 4i> 



CM 00 CM 

1— ' 00 si CO On 
si s] ID l/l CO 



O CO H W ^ 
CO CD O CJ\ Cn 
O lO H sj O 











l\J 


H 


O 






tsj 1— • 




si 


O 


50 






>» V. 




>. 


H 


J> 


On 


1— 1 


00 00 


Cn 


•— ' 


> 


Z 


CT 


o 


CO CM 


Cm 


Cn 


!— ' 


a 


o 


sj 


t— ■ CO 


Cn 


on 



















i—i 


H 




tsj CM 




t— ' tsj 


1— ' 




Cn 


O 




N. ^ 




U * 


» 




v. 


H 


Isj 


CM 4^ 00 


si 


CM O S] ISJ 


tsj Cn 


00 cm 


1—" 


> 


CO O I-' 


CO lsj Cn .E* t— ■ 


-P> 


ON O •— ■ 4i> 


ISJ CM 


si Cn 


O 


r- 


O -Ci ISJ 


cm co cm <o on 


o> 


s] O ON CO 


O 00 w 


I—" Isj 


oo 





t— ' tsj 



tsj 



00 



Cn ON 

On isj cn J^ 
ISJ <D 00 <D ON 



si CM CO si 

Is) W Cv 



ON Si 



[ J 

4^ 

Cn on CO 



tsj h- 1 si I — 

isj On On sj 

O O 00 CO CO 



00 
CM 

t-' o 



o o 



tsj CM 

o o 



o o 



W H H 

On O si 

O oo Cn isj cm 



I— ' tsj 

CO 4^ Cn 

isj Cn tsj 4^ Cn 

4^ 00 ON ON tsj 



ON CO 

4^ Cn t— ■ 
CO CO W O 



Cn 

CO 



Cm cn h- 1 On isj 
Cn cm O Cn O 

O W H H H 



O Is) CfJ C4 Un 
Cn cn vj o O 



4^ W VD M 

4^ CO Cn On 00 
O CO 00 00 CM 



i— 1 4^ W 

O W W 4> 

O O CD ON 00 



isj 
s] 

ON 



cn w 

i-i 4^ CO 
O CM On 4^ 



tsj cn CO cn t— ■ 
4^ O On tsj cn 

Cn sj 4^ >— ' \— ' 



Oq VO ON I— ' 

ii. ID H W W 
O CD tO tsj sj 



s] 

4^ 
CO 



C/J 
cn 

CD 



O 
4^ 
00 



o 

4^ 



0O 

si 

4^ 
4^ 



> 



> r- 

2 > 

O H 

m 
m 

< > 

m ti 

z H 

i — i tn 



o 



■40- 



H 



rr: 



COURTS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT 

This section deals with the Juvenile Facilities, adult correctional 
facilities, state trial courts (civil an d criminal), and the federal trial 
court in Maryland (civil and criminal) . 

The juvenile facilities in Maryland are under the jurisdiction of the 
State Department of Juvenile Services, a department which came into existence 
on July 1, 1967. Prior to that time responsibility for the juvenile institu- 
tions rested in a bureau within the State Department of Public Welfare. In 
the eleven month period from July, 1968 through May, 1969 there were 23,448 
juvenile court cases reported with the greater portion coming from Baltimore 
City (7,477), followed by the metropolitan counties of Prince George's (4,837), 
Baltimore (2,769), and Montgomery (2,730). The average daily population of 
the right juvenile institutions in the State was 1,632 as of May, 1969, an 
increase of 16.7 per cent over May, 1968. 

Adult correctional institutions in the State housed an average daily 
population of 5,369 inmates in fiscal 1967. The average annual per capita 
cost per inmate was $2,165. More inmates were committed from Baltimore City 
(2,707) during fiscal 1967 than were committed from the combined counties 
(1,486). These statistics, of course, deal with the statewide correctional 
institutions, and local facilities are not included. The institutions covered 
in this Abstract are the Maryland House of Correction, Maryland Penetentiary, 
Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown, Maryland Correctional Institution 
for Women, and the Correctional Camp System. 

As of July, 1968, there are 74 trial judges in the state which is 
divided into eight judicial districts for administrative purposes. Each 
county has a minimum of one jurist, and Baltimore City has 21 trial judges. 
On the basis of population per judge, the range is from 15,600 per judge in 



-41- 



Kent County to 102,200 per judge in Prince George's County. However, these 
extreme ranges are severe, and a more moderate range will be noted generally 
by the reader in the table. On a statewide average, the population per judge 
is 50,898, with 684 civil cases and 292 criminal cases representing the trial 
load. During the year September 1, 1967 through August 31, 1968, 50,594 civil 
cases were filed in Maryland trial courts, a 2.7 per cent increase over the 
prior year, but 49,975 civil cases were disposed of in the same period, an 
8.9 per cent increase in disposition. 

There was a 12.6 per cent increase in the filing of criminal cases, 
and an 11.2 per cent increase in dispositions in this area. As a consequence, 
therefore, when all cases (civil and criminal) filed in the trial courts of 
Maryland are considered for this period, there were 72,188 cases filed, an 
increase of 5.5 per cent, while there were 69,943 dispositions, representing 
a 10 per cent decrease. 

The United States District Court for the District of Maryland (coin- 
cident with the state boundaries) sits in Baltimore City. Relatively speaking 
its backlog remains in good condition. As of June 30, 1968, there were 1,494 
civil cases pending, an increase of approximately 5 per cent from the preceding 
year, and 271 criminal cases pending, approximately an 8 per cent increase. 
In absolute terms 1,129 civil cases and 412 criminal cases were terminated 
during the fiscal year. 

The bankruptcy backlog did increase at a greater rate, 25.2 per cent, 
with 402 cases being commenced and 322 terminated. Nearly 10,000 passport 
applications were handled, and more than 900 aliens were naturalized in the 
Court during the 1968 fiscal year. 



-42- 



NO. 33 



NUMBER OF JUDGES, POPULATION AND CASE LOAD PER JUDGE, MARYLAND 
TRIAL COURTS, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: JULY 1968 



JURISDICTION 



NUMBER OF 
JUDGES 



POPULATION 
PER JUDGE 



CASES FILED PER JUDGE 



CIVIL 



CRIMINAL 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



74 

2 

5 

21 

9 

1 

1 

1 
2 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
2 
1 

8 
6 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 



50,898 

43,800 
57,240 
43,286 
65,877 
18,800 

20,100 
65,200 
27,650 
42,700 
29,200 

43,750 
24,400 
54,000 
27,600 
15,600 

58,075 
102,200 
18,000 
43,800 
19,300 

22,000 
54,400 
52,900 
26,200 



684 



292 



522 


186 


633 


210 


844 


582 


620 


223 


446 


195 


228 


44 


761 


156 


495 


103 


518 


263 


327 


143 


440 


87 


260 


85 


626 


115 


389 


150 


270 


121 


730 


109 


1,107 


321 


240 


102 


584 


175 


262 


87 


300 


79 


597 


135 


832 


287 


385 


238 



Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, "Annual Report 1967-1968," p. 11 



-43- 



NO. 34 CASES FILED IN TRIAL COURTS, MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1967 ^ 















PER CENT 


CHANGE 




1968 






1967 


1967/196* 
F 


I 


TYPE OF CASE 


FILING 


DISPOSITIONS 


FILING 


DISPOSITIONS 


D 


Law 


25,583 


26,539 


26,081 


24,082 


-1.9 


10.2 


Equity 


25,011 


23,436 


23,164 


21,813 


8.0 


7.4 


Total Civil 














Cases 


50,594 


49,975 


49,245 


45,895 


2.7 


8.9 


Criminal 


21,594 


19,968 


19,173 


17,691 


12.6 


12.9 


Total All Types 


72,188 


69,943 


68,418 


63,586 


5.5 


10.0 



September 1 of preceding year through August 31 of stated year. 
Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, "Annual Report 1967-1968." 



■44- 



NO. 35 AVERAGE TIME INTERVALS, DISPOSITION OF APPEALS, MARYLAND COURT OF 

APPEALS, IN MONTHS: 1958-1967 



COURT 
TERM 



TOTAL 
INTERVAL 



DOCKETED TO 
ARGUMENT 


7 


8 


8 


3 


7 


9 


6 


1 


4 


9 


4 


6 


4 


9 


5 


2 


3 


7 


4 


8 



ARGUMENT TO 
DECISION 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 
1959 
1958 



8.9 
9.4 
8.7 
7.3 
6.1 
6.1 
6.1 
6.4 
5.0 
5.8 



1.1 
1.1 
0.8 
1.2 
1.2 
1.5 
1.2 
1.2 
1.3 
1.0 



Source: Administrative Office of the Courts, "Annual Report 1967-1968" page 26 



■45- 



w 



w 

> 

< 



to 



O 



CTi CO 






i-H PJ 






I— I 






OS F- 


00 


(NJ 


cu 2 


• 


• 


X X 


(N 


to 


E- O 






O U 







u 



-J E- 

< t-H 

CQ U 



CT> CO 



E- >- 

J E- 
< >-. 



o 
to 



to 



J 


CO 












o 


LU 


1—1 


.— 1 


vO 


CM 


I— 1 


a, 


1— I 












o 


H 


to 


to 


(N 


to 


to 


cd 


Z 












F- 


X 












PJ 


o 













o 
■^ 



O0 



to 



CM 



LO 

to 



CM 



CTi 
CN 



to 



to 



to 



CO 
(Nl 



CO 

to 



to 

CN 






00 

to 



CN 

to 






o 



00 



00 
LO 



o 
to 



to 



LO 



<3" 



o 
"3- 



to 



to 



to 
to 



00 


r^ 


VO 


m 


■rj- 


vO 


vO 


\0 


\D 


vD 


o> 


G> 


(T> 


O* 


C7> 





0) 






CuO 






h 






o 













ID 













o 






G 


• 




•H 


^t 




fH 






Dh 


P, 




T3 






P 


~ 




rt 


*\ 


• 




00 


U 


* 


vO 


a 


X 


Q> 





fn 


r-H 


X 


<D 


1 




s 


r- 


T3 


o 


\D 





M 


o> 


P 


P 


i-H 


05 


C 




P 


o 


P 


V) 


s: 


5-i 
O 


IH 


*. 


Ph 


O 










f-i 


OS 


i-H 


O 




to 


6 


r— 1 




•H 


0j 


p 


+-> 


3 


(/) 


t— 1 


c 


a 


0J 

CQ 


p 
< 


^ 




~ 


< 


** 






i-H 


** 


x 


<D 


to 


W> 


TJ 


p 


P 


p 


5-i 


o 


s 


P 
O 


X 


< 


u 


P 














5-i 


c 


X 


rf 


p 


p 





< 




X 




m 







o 


5h 


u 




O 


o3 





•H 




o 


fn 


to 


•H 


Oh 





tp 




■H 


<P 


<p 


P 


o 


o 


p 






3 





U 


o 


> 





o 


• H 


XI 




P 


e 


p 


rt 





ctf 


5-i 


4-> 


p 


p 


Ph 


•H 


c/) 


0) 


t-H 


•H 


LO 


o 


p 




P. 


•H 


o 


o 


s 


P 


5h 


-o 




P 


< 


to 







5h 


E 




0) 




• • 


m 











X 


o 


OS 


H 


5-i 


y v 


t — \ 


3 


.— 1 


(N 


O 

CO 



■46- 



NO. 37 DISPOSITION OF JUVENILE COURT CASES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 

FISCAL YEAR 1969 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



REPORTED CASES 
JUNE, 1969 



CUMULATIVE TOTAL 
FISCAL YEAR 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



2,077 

43 

85 

754 

202 





25,525 

514 
1,086 
8,231 
2,971 

116 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



16 

7 
40 
11 
11 



132 
164 
358 
161 
154 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 



44 

1 

110 

14 
5 



361 
90 
693 
306 
129 



Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



165 

405 

13 

46 

6 





24 

75 



2,895 

5,242 

132 

253 

103 

64 
737 
325 
308 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Juvenile Services, Monthly Report, 
June, 1969, Table 9. 



-47- 



NO. 38 UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR MARYLAND, BANKRUPTCY, ADMINISTRATIVE, AND 

CITIZENSHIP MATTERS: JULY 1, 1967-JUNE 30, 1968 



BANKRUPTCY CASES 

Pending as of 7/1/67 317 

Commenced 402 

Terminated 322 

Pending as of 6/30/68 397 

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS 9,852 

PETITIONS FOR NATURALIZATION 896 

ALIENS NATURALIZED 938 



Source: "Annual Report of the Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts, 1968," Tables Fl and PI. 



NO. 39 UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR MARYLAND, CIVIL AND CRIMINAL CASES 

JULY 1, 1967-JUNE 30, 1968 



TOTAL CIVIL CASES (U. S. AND PRIVATE) 

Pending as of 7/1/67 1,418 

Commenced 1,205 

Terminated 1,129 

Pending as of 6/30/68 1,494 

CRIMINAL CASES 

Pending as of 7/1/67 250 

Commenced 433 

Terminated 412 

Pending as of 6/30/68 271 

Pending with fugitive defendants, etc. 21 

Includes fugitives and defendants serving in the Armed Forces. 

Data include only cases pending 6 months or more at the end of the fiscal year. 

Source: "Annual Report of the Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts, 1968," Tables CI and Dl. 



-48- 



NO. 40 JURISDICTIONS FROM WHICH COMMITTED PERSONS WERE RECEIVED: 

FISCAL YEAR 1967 



(1) 



JURISDICTION 



NUMBER 



PER CENT OF TOTAL 



Maryland 

Allegany County 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



4,193 

28 

168 

2,707 

207 

34 



100.0 

.7 

4.0 

64.6 

4.9 

.8 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



8 
33 
39 

57 
29 



.2 

.8 

.9 

1.4 

.7 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 



47 
15 
31 
33 
20 



1.1 

.4 
.7 
.8 
.5 



Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne ' s 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



136 

366 

13 

18 

13 

18 
58 
97 
18 



3.2 

8.7 

.3 

.4 

.3 

.4 
1.4 
2.3 

.4 



Percent totals may not add due to rounding. 



CD 



The receiving institutions are the Maryland House of Correction, the Maryland 
Penetentiary, the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown, the Maryland 
Correctional Institution for Women-Jessup, and the Receiving Centers for Males 
and Females. 



Source: Maryland Department of Correction, "Forty- first Report, Fiscal Year 1967,' 
p. 33. 



■49- 



NO. 41 



AGE GROUPS OF COMMITTED PERSONS, ALL ADULT INSTITUTIONS 

FISCAL YEAR 1967 



AGE 



NUMBER 



PER CENT OF TOTAL 



Total 

16 years and younger 

17 years 

18 years 

19 years 

20 years 

21 years 
22-25 years 
26-30 years 
31-35 years 
36-40 years 
41-50 years 
51-60 years 

61 years and older 



4,193 
209 
290 
334 
324 
277 
234 
789 
604 
391 
247 
341 
117 
36 



100.0 



5.0 
6.9 
8.0 

7.7 



6.6 

5.6 

18.8 

14.4 

9.3 

5.9 

8.1 

2.8 

.9 



Source: Maryland Department of Correction, "Forty-first Report, Fiscal Year 1967," 
p. 32. 



NO. 42 



LENGTHS OF SENTENCES OF COMMITTED PERSONS, ALL ADULT 
INSTITUTIONS: FISCAL YEAR 1967 



SENTENCE LENGTH 



NUMBER 



PER CENT OF TOTAL 



Total Sentences 

3 months 

4-6 months 

7 months - 1 year 

13-18 months 



19 


months - 


2 years 


25 


months - 


3 years 


37 


months - 


5 years 


61 


months - 


8 years 


97 


months - 


10 years 


121 months ■ 


- 15 years 


Mo] 


re than 15 years 


Li: 


fe 




To 


be executed 


Indefinite 





4,193 
108 
931 

743 

601 

415 

485 

425 

150 

123 

85 

89 

32 

1 

5 



100.0 

2.6 

22. 

17, 

14, 

9, 



11.6 
10.1 
3.6 
2.9 
2.0 
2.1 
.8 

(1) 
.1 



CD 



Less than .1 per cent. 



Percent totals may not add due to rounding. 

Source: Maryland Department of Correction, "Forty-first Report, Fiscal Year 1967," 
p. 32. 



■50- 



NO. 43 



AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION OF JUVENILE INSTITUTIONS 
JUNE 1969 AND JUNE 1968 







AVERAGE DAILY 
JUNE, 1969 


POPULATION 
JUNE, 1968 


PER 


CENT CHANGE 


INSTITUTION 


JUNE, 1968 


- JUNE, 1969 




1 


,606 


1 


,436 






11.8 


Boys Village 




371 




294 






26.2 


Maryland Training School 
















for Boys 




396 




408 






-2.9 


Montrose School for Girls 




262 




218 






20.2 


Victor Cullen 




146 




124 






17.7 


House of Good Shepherd 




105 




115 






-8.7 


Forestry Camps 




163 




127 






28.3 


Maryland Children's Center 




107 




96 






11.5 


T. J. S. Waxter 




56 




54 






3.7 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Juvenile Services, Monthly Report, 
June, 1969, Table 13. 



NO. 44 



ADULT CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONAL POPULATIONS: FISCAL YEAR 1967 



INSTITUTION 



RATED 
CAPACITY 



AVERAGE DAILY 
POPULATION 



ANNUAL PER 
CAPITA COSTS 



All Adult Correctional 

Institutions 5,515 

Maryland House of Correction 1,505 

Maryland Penitentiary 950 
Maryland Correctional 

Institution, Hagerstown 1,706 
Maryland Correctional 

Institution for Women 204 

Correctional Camps 948 

Central Laundry 202 

Totals 5,515 



5,369 
1,734 
1,305 

1,405 

170 
575 
180 

5,369 



$2,165 
1,902 
2,240 

2,223 

3,827 
2,169 
1,113 



Source: Maryland Department of Correction, "Forty-first Report, Fiscal Year 1967", 
p. 13. 



■51- 



CLIMATE OF MARYLAND 

Maryland lies in the region midway between the rigorous climates 
of the North and the mild climates of the South. Since it is located 
in the middle latitudes where the general atmospheric flow is from West 
to East across North America, it has a continental type of climate with 
its marked temperature contrast between summer and winter; however, two 
important bodies of water, the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean 
have an important modifying control on the climate, especially by moder- 
ating extreme temperatures of adjacent areas. 

The average annual temperature ranges from 48° F in the Garrett 
County area to 58° F in the lower Chesapeake Bay area. The highest 
temperature on record is 109° recorded at several places in Allegany 
and Frederick Counties while the lowest is -40° F at Oakland, Garrett 
County. Based on the 1931-1960 period, the average annual precipita- 
tion ranges from as much as 46 to 49 inches at opposite ends of the 
State, Allegany Plateau and Southern Eastern Shore, to as little as 36 
inches in the Cumberland area located in the "rain shadow" just to the 
east of the Allegany Plateau. Elsewhere over the State, the annual 
precipitation ranges monthly between 40 to 44 inches. Monthly distri- 
bution is quite uniform, averaging between 2 and 4 inches each month and 
reaching a maximum between 4 and 5 1/2 inches in July or August. Annual 
snowfall ranges from a minimum of 8 to 10 inches along the costal areas 
of southern Eastern Shore to a maximum of near 100 inches in parts of 
Garrett County. 

Prevailing winds are mostly from the west-northwest to north- 
west except during the months of May through September when they become 
more southerly. Damaging or dangerous storms, such as tornadoes, hur- 
ricanes, and blizzards, are infrequent. 



-52- 



The climate of Maryland is a dependable natural resource which 
provides an excellent setting for the agricultural, industrial, commer- 
cial and recreational activities of its citizens. 



•53- 



NO. 45 



LOCATION OF MARYLAND WEATHER STATIONS FOR WHICH 
CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA ARE PRESENTED 



STATION 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



LATITUDE 
(NORTH) 



LONGITUDE 
(WEST) 



ELEVATION 
(FEET) 



Annapolis (U. S. Naval 
Academy) 

Baltimore Weather Bureau 
(City Office Customs 
House) 

Baltimore Weather Bureau 
(Friendship Interna- 
tional Airport) 

Boyds (2 miles northwest) 

Cambridge 

Centreville 

Chestertown 

Clarksville (3 miles 
north- northeast) 

College Park 

Conowingo Dam 

Crisfield Dam 

Cumberland 

Easton 

Elkton 

Frederick 

Frostburg 

Hagerstown 

Hancock 

La Plata 



Anne Arundel 



Baltimore City 



38°59' 



39°17 ! 



76°29' 



76°37' 



40 



14 



Anne Arundel 


39°11' 


76°40 f 


148 


Montgomery 


30°12' 


77°20' 


580 


Dorchester 


38°34' 


76°09' 


5 


Queen Anne's 


39°03' 


76°03' 


46 


Kent 


39°13' 


76°04' 


35 


Howard 


59°15' 


76°56* 


365 


Prince George's 


38°59» 


76°56' 


70 


Harford 


39° 39' 


76° 10' 


40 


Somerset 


37°59' 


75°52' 


7 


Allegany 


39°39' 


78°45' 


945 


Talbot 


38°45' 


76°04' 


40 


Cecil 


39° 30* 


75°50» 


28 


Frederick 


39°25' 


71°28' 


435 


Allegany 


39° 39' 


78°56» 


2,035 


Washington 


39°38' 


77°41* 


560 


Washington 


39°42' 


78°11' 


428 


Charles 


38°32' 


77°00' 


140 



(continued on following page) 



■54- 



NO. 45 



LOCATION OF MARYLAND WEATHER STATIONS FOR WHICH 
CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA ARE PRESENTED (Cont'd. 1 









POLITICAL 


LATITUDE 


LONGITUDE 


ELEVATION 


STATION 




SUBDIVISION 


(NORTH) 


(WEST) 


(FEET) 


Leonardtown 




St. Mary's 


38°19' 


76°40' 


40 


Millington 




Kent 


39°16" 


75°51' 


30 


Oakland 




Garrett 


39° 24' 


79°24' 


2,420 


Ocean City 




Worcester 


38°20" 


75°05' 


17 


Owings Ferry 


Landing 


Calvert 


38°42' 


76°41' 


120 


Princess Anne 




Somerset 


38°13' 


75°41' 


20 


Ridgely 




Caroline 


38°57' 


75°53' 


57 


Salisbury 




Wicomico 


38°22' 


75°35* 


10 


Snow Hill 




Worcester 


38°11' 


75°24' 


14 


Solomons 




Calvert 


38°19' 


76°27' 


12 


Towson 




Baltimore 


39°24* 


76°37' 


410 


Westminster 




Carroll 


39°35' 


77°00* 


770 


Woodstock 




Baltimore 


39°20' 


76°52' 


415 



■55- 



o 




\D 




<y> 




i— i 




i— i 




to 




CT> 




r— 1 




»k 




Q 




O 


co 


i— i 


a 


os 


o 


pj 


i— i 


a. 


OS 




UJ 


OS 


u. 


< 




UJ 


PJ 


X 


UJ 




os 


X 


PL 


H 


1 


OS 


PJ 


i— i 


Kl 


X 


PJ 


P 


PJ 




OS 


2 


PL 


O 






PL 


a 


O 


pj 




CO 


X 


< 


H 


OQ 


CJ3 




2 


< 


PJ 


H 


J 


< 




Q 


PJ 




CJ 


UJ 


< 


Kl 


OS 


PJ 


UJ 


UJ 


> 


os 


< 


PL 




-J 


^ 


rj 


<£ 


< 




PL 




a 




2 




< 




CJ 




2 




i— i 




OS 




O- 




co 





sD 
tT 



X PJ 
















E- PJ 
















u os 
















2 B- 
















PJ i 




/ — \ 












►J PJ 


Q 


CO 












M 


o 


X 












PJ UJ 


1— 1 


< 












u uj 


os 


a 


CM 


00 


^r 


o 


r- <* lo to 


< OS 


PJ 




to 


to 


cr> 


00 


CTl 00 O LO 


OS Pl 


a. 


2 


CM 


CM 


!— 1 


T—i 


i— 1 i— 1 CN i— 1 


UJ 




»—i 












> UL. 




v — ' 












< o 

















o 

co P-, UJ 

OS O 03 



PL, J 



PL, 


< 


o 


PL 


CO 


2 


LU 


i — i 


H 




< 


PJ 


LLZ 


u 




Z. 


UJ 


LU 


CJ 


OS 


< 


OS 


OS 


ro 


w 


LU 


> 


u 


< 


o 





PL, 




o 


f- 




CO 


CJ 


< 


2 


J 


h- 1 




cu 


u. 


u. 


o 


CO 


CO 


2 


LU 


i — i 


F-h 




< 


UJ 


L^ 


u 




2 


UJ 


LU 


CJ 


OS 


< 


CU 


BJ 


D 


UJ 


u 


> 


u 


< 


o 



vC 



u co 

i— i i— i 
E- > 



o u 

CD 

a a 



r-. ai 



> > 

o o 



0) 

PL, 



\Q LO 



rH rH 

rt 03 



o 
to 



CD 

T3 

C 
3 

rH 

< 

CD 

C 

c 



CM 



X 



u 

CD 
U 

o 

E 



a3 

OQ 



5n 

• -— n CD 
CO XX 

E 4-> 

• CD cd 

o 

CO < 
•H M 

,— I rH O 

O rt £ 

P, > -H 

ri a) +j 

C 2 >-h 

p as 

< CO 



4-> 



LU 







CM CN CN] 


• 


• 


- — - ' W ~_~ • 


O 


O 


o 


CD 


CD 


1 1 I CD 


Q 


a 


Q 


,— i 


^r 


CT> 00 00 rH 


CM 


r-l 


CM ^H CM tO 



CM 



o 



o> 



43 
CD 
PL 



O 
CM 



U 

Ph 
< 



CD 
TJ 

P 
3 
U 
< 

C 

c 
< 



> > > > <_> 

o o o o o 

2 2 2 2 O 



N (N CM CM 
CM CM 



O 

o 



CM 



u 
Ph 
< 



X 

rH 

CD 

E 
o 

bO 
+-> 

C 

o 



rH 

CD 

X 
■M 

a3 
<D 



i 

Tj 

C i 

CD 03 

•H C 

Sh U 

PL 



o o 



> 4-> 
O O 

2 O 



o oi "3- 

CM H H 



X3 X rH 
CD CD 05 
PL P- S 



vO t H \D CO 

CM H M CM 



rH ^1 rH rH rH 

oj oS o3 o3 Ph 

S S 2 s < 



to o o LO 

i— I CM i— I 



rH rH 5-i X 

p, p, Cl, as 
< < < 2 



CD 
+-> 
t/5 
CD 

O 

u 
o 



-a 

+j aJ 
O 



Q C L^ X 








u 

•H 

4-1 

O 



■P < E 



OQ 



C 

P i-i 
cd 

P, 

f-l -H 

P -C 

DQ (^ 



1/1 


CM 2 

^— 'X 

+-> 

w J-l 

*a o 

X2 
O 

0Q 





i— I 
t30 -H 
T3 > 
•H 

u u 

E C 
cS 
U U 







O 
4-> 

fH > 

VI 

+J -^ 

co U 

as 

u u 



T3 
X C 
h ■(-> rt 




t/l 


os 



M 

U 

o 



vD t^ r^ CTl C1T> 
t^ 00 to vD 00 
i— I ■— I CM i— I r— I 



00 O -3- LO to O 
CT> 00 r-- LO \D LO 



01 


to 




"St 


>* 




CTl 


r~- 


co 


i — i 


CM 




i — i 


CM 




<—i 


CM 






rj 




^) 


U 


CJ 




O 


o 




U 


o 


> 


u 


> 





a 


1 


o 





1 








O 





O 


a 


a 




Q 


a 




Q 


a 


2 


a 


■z. 


CM 


r^ 


f~- 


CO 


o 


CT> 


^r 


i — i 


to 


^ 


1 — 1 


i — i 


i — i 


i — I 




CM 


CM 


i — i 


i — i 






to 



> > > > 

O O o o 

2 2 Q 2 2 



> > > > > -M 

o o o o o o 

2 2 2 2 2 O 



CO 

r-l 


C 

CM 


CTl 


o 


to 

CM 


CM 


1^ 

1 — 1 


LT, 


L0 


i— 1 


to 


*-> 

CD 
O 


O 

o 


> 

o 
2 


4-» 
U 

o 


o 
o 


■U> 
O 

o 


■u 

u 

o 


o 
o 


a 

o 


♦J 

u 

c 


4-1 

u 

o 



00 


r- 


r-^ 


o 




r-^ 


00 


'^r 


M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


r-\ CM 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


r— 1 




rH 


X 


X 


X 


X3 




X 


X 


u 


U 


fH 


a) 





1 





1 








o3 


03 


03 


PL 


PL 


PL 


PL 




U- 


PL 


S 


s 


2 


"3- 


CM 


"%r so 


K- 


r— ( 


to 


CT) 


co 


LO 


co 


CM 


CM 


rH CM 


rH 


,— 1 


CM 


CM 









h rl,Q ^ H 

oS 03 a3 o3 

S S PL S S 



fH fH rH rH rH rH 

03 03 o3 p, Ph Ph 
S S S < < < 



sD LO 


r-^ 


to 


r^ 


•^J- 


C 


LT: 


tO r—i 


vO 


CM rH 


CM 


CM 


^H 


1— 1 


CM 


rj 






rH rH 


u 


rH 


rH 


rH 


u 


u 


X X 


X 


P, Ph 


rt 


Ph 


Ph 


Ph 


CU 


Ph 


oS aJ 


03 


< < 


S 


< 


< 


< 


< 


< 


2 2 


S 


(/) 


















•0 


















bO 


















rH 


















o 














C 


C 















u. 


o 


o 


o 


UJ 


X 









a 


X +j 


•)-> 


T3 





p 


c 






■H 


C M 


DO 


U 


tn 


03 


•H 


+J 




U 


03 p 


C 


O O 


rH 


W) 


i—l 


o 


1 — 1 





DO-rH 


•H 


C <+H 


o 





o 


x 


•H 


TJ 


X 


X 


•H H 


E 


i— i 


rH 


rH 


CJ 





i— 1 10 


</> 


rH CU 


O 


,-H 


03 


03 


o 


u 


rH 03 


03 


a, x; 


w 


< 


u 


E- 


r vj 


PL 


< S 


S 



Ui 

u 
03 

a, 
i 

bO 




E 
oS 
Q 

O TJ 

bo <—< 
C 

•H 



T3 
C 
03 



PL PL ,-H 



LA, 



u 




3 
O 
C 

O O rH 3 

cm u u u 



X 

>— I 



be 



CJ3 
U 
P 

u 
tfl 

o 



UJ PL PL 



2rH 

w o 

rH O 
O 

bO C 
oS 03 

X X 



■56- 



tu 






ac uj 






H a: 






o u- 




i — ' 


2 i 




co 


PJ UJ 


Q 


>H 


J m 


o 


< 


w 


1 — 1 


a 


UJ w 


cc 




u oi 


UJ 


2 


£*• 


a. 


►— i 


UJ u. 






> o 







o 

E- J 
co u-, tu 

Di O CQ 



PL. J 



PL, 

o 

UJ 

H 

< 



< 
Pl, 



a: 
ofc> 



UJ UJ 

< 0i 

a: s 

uj u 

> u 

< o 





PL. 


o 






O 


J 




H 




UJ 




CO 


u 


03 




< 


2 






-j 


i — i 


QJ 






DS 


o 




ft, 


a, 




3 


O 


CO 


H 


-* 






< 


CM 


CO 


2 






UJ 


i — i 


CO 




H 




UJ 




< 


UJ 


a 




a 


u 


uo 






2 


H 




UJ 


UJ 


< 




o 


OS 


a: 


3 


£ 


a! 


UJ 


CM 


D 


a. 


to 


UJ 


t 3 


:>: 




> 


u 


UJ 




< 


o 


E- 





\D 



^O 



u co 

i— i i— i 

H > 

i — i i— i 

j a 

O 03 

a, 3 
co 



tO H IO CM O LO 

00 O 00 CM rf CTl 

HCMHHNH 



h (NO 00 tO 

i— I i— I , — ^ i— I 

CM 

O O O > CJ 

(D O I 
Q Q Q 2 Q 



lo r-» vo lo t~- to 

I— I CM r— I I— I CM 



O H Tf 000 N W 

oo en oo to oo r-- vo 

i— I i— I i— I CM i-H i— I I— H 



r-~- cm 



oo r^ n- 



O U U O O CJ 

<u i a> a> 

Q Q Q Q Q Q 



tO "3- CT> O CTl CM \D 
r— I CM i— t i— I i—( 



> > > 4-> O > 
O O O O CD O 
2 2 2 O O 2 



H HCO (N N vO 
CM tO i— t CM i— I CM 



> > > CJ > > > 

O O O CD O O O 

2 2 2 Q 2 2 2 



o vo *3- to "* r-N. o 

CM CM CM CN i— I i-H i— I 



+-> +-> +-» P > +-> 
O CJ O CD O O 

O O O CO 2 O 



O \D tO Tf O 00 
CM CM CM i— t i— l 



4-> 4-) +-> > 4-> 4-i 4-> 
O O CJ O O O O 

O O O 2 O O O 



to r«- \o 



oo to CM 



CD CD CD OS CD CD 

PL, PL, LL, 2? PL, PL, 



o o cm to r^ oo 

CM CM CM CM CNJ i—( 



^3^^ X3 5n 5h 
CD I aS aj 
PL, PL, PL, pl, 5" 5" 



O "3" O CM CM CM O 
CM <— I CM CM CM tO 



U U U 5h J3 u 
as ctJ aS Oh as 

2 2 S> < PL. S 



.— I tO 0O tO LO rt 

CM hh (M CM H 



U U U U U U U 
aS aS aS aj aS aS aS 
S 2 S S S 2 S 



to oo to o t-» to 00 

CM <— < CM CM i— I CM CM 



u u u X u u 

p, P P aS as p, 

< < < 2 S < 



U U U U 5-i U U 

p p p aS p, p, p, 

< < < 2 < < < 





- 






5h 








5n 














>, 











■P 


o 







Lh 




i-H 


(/) 


u 




4-J 


•M 


+-> 





u 


4-1 


4-) 


O 


i — i 


o 





rt 




+-> 


1/5 


5n 


C/i 


■H 


t/1 


h 


E 


i-H 


E 


1 — 1 


>: 




<u 








5n 


B 








■H 


o 


• H 


u 




+J 


5h 


CJ 


> 





o 


CJ 


> 


4-> 


Jh 


4-> 


as 


• 


C 


5h 


5-i 


•—< 


6 


u 


fH 


i — 1 


rH 


Jh 


<—i 


jS 


*j 





aS 


o 


aS 


o 


■H 


o 


ctS 


aJ 


aj 


a 


U 


CO 


Ui 


U 


i: 


CJ 


CO 


s 


3i 


u 


co 


u 


co 



C ^ 5h 

S C X 5h 

O O +-> 00 

03 4-< 4-» -H PL, c 

4-1 T3 OCT) U 

aS 5h C C 

i—i aS -h a) c 

Ou, c i— t •— i aS 

o ^-i M 

as -h as o 



-J J 



O O O 



•H Id r 

W T) JD 

GO p O <S> 

C aj C -h 

■ H -J -H i— I 

5 5h aS 



X-H 

5h ^h 

=5 • H 



5h 



-v +-> Ai 

-I L0 U 

-'CO 

C -H +J 

O E 00 

in t-i t) 

5 L0 o 

o 



Cu CO CO CO E- S 



o 

vO 
CT) 





X 
+-> 

o 

4-> 

c 

•H 

c 


4-» 

X 


aS 

E 

C 
aS 

oo 
5h 
aj 


o 
to 

c 

aj 






u 


.— 1 


as 







X 


X 


1— 1 




X) 


X 


aS 


u 


5h 








> 


T3 





•H 




L0 


5h 


c 


3 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


L0 




•H 


4-> 




o 


t3 


c 


5h 




o 


L0 


O 








o 


cc 


a 



•57- 



X 



CO 



E- 






< 






U 






O 






J 






Q 






PJ 


CO 




H 


CO 




U 


PJ 




PJ 


J 




hJ 


z 




PJ 


■=> 




CO 


o 




E- 


vD 




< 


CT) 

H 




J 


1 




j 


l— I 




< 


to 




PL, 


CT) 




3: 


i— 1 




O 




Q 


2 




PJ 


CO 




E- 




Q 


O 


Q 


Z 


Z 


§> 


J 


PJ 




>H 


CO 


Z 


as 


1 — 1 


o 

1 — 1 


gj 


as 


H 




pj 


< 


CL, 


X 


E- 


o 


E- 


i— i 




O 


JX 


PJ 




HH 


E- 




u 


< 




PJ 


E- 




a: 


CO 




o- 


PJ 




- 


X 




pj 


H 




as 






3 






H 






< 






as 






pj 






a. 






S 






pj 






E- 






PJ 






CJ 






< 






as 






pj 






> 






< 










X 



+-> 

c 

O 

u 



o 

oT 

c 
c 
< 











TT 
















i—i 








^o 


CT) 


to 




to 


CT) 






vO 


LO 


vO 




CM 


t^ 






to 


00 


vO 




o 


vO 






LO 


CTi 


r^ 




^~ 


CM 






vO 


•** 


LO 




"st 


i-H 






\D 


"* 


LO 




^r 


CM 






vo 


L0 


i-H 




LO 
00 


to 






r-- 


CM 


o 




vO 

1—1 


CD 






rj- 


■ — i 


00 




• 


to 






LO 


CM 


CT) 






t-o 






<* 


bO 


to 




CM 








"=t 


to 


to 




to 








i-H 


o 


1 — 1 




oo 


r-. 






"* 


CM 


oo 




o 

i-H 


\o 






LO 


i—l 


00 




. 








\0 


i-H 


00 












LO 


-3- 


"*t 




CM 








LO 


--T 


<3- 




to 








vO 


CC 


CM 




to 


i-H 






-%r 


\D 


o 




LO 
CM 


I-H 






vO 


^H 


CTl 




• 








CO 


i — i 


o 




• 








vO 


LO 


LO 




CM 








v£) 


LO 


vO 




to 








o 


cc 


CTi 






o 






00 


"3" 


vO 




to 


o 






t-- 


cm 


CTl 












00 


CM 


O 












t-« 


>0 


vO 




to 








I-- 


vO 


t-~ 




to 








o 


CT, 


C 




c 

LO 


o 






to 


CM 


to 




o 

>x> 


o 






tO 


CO 


vO 




• 








LO 


CTi 


r^ 




• 








00 


vO 


t^ 




•** 








oo 


VO 


t^ 




"nT 








I-H 


00 


LO 




1 — 1 


o 






-3- 


r~- 


i— i 




CT) 

to 


o 






LO 


CTi 


h- 












r^ 


a 


CT» 




• 








00 


^ 


r^ 




■vt 








oo 


r^ 


r-- 




•xT 








1— 1 


CN 


CM 




I— 1 

LO 


o 






^ 


o 


t^. 




00 


o 






1— 1 


LO 


to 




• 








to 


\o 


^i- 




• 








oo 


& 


t-^ 




to 








CO 


VO 


r^ 




to 








i-H 


i — i 


i-H 




to 

00 


o 






i-H 


1 — 1 


r—< 




LO 

.— 1 


c 






CM 


£) 


*3" 




• 








LO 


r~ 


\£) 




• 








f^ 


LO 


vD 




to 








r-» 


LO 


\D 




^T 








o 


LO 


CO 




i-H 

to 


i-H 






r~- 


^D 


r^ 




i—l 
1-^ 


\D 






CM 


LO 


to 




• 








tj- 


\C 


LO 




• 








\D 


*sf 


LO 




to 








sO 


rl- 


LO 




to 








f» 


-r 


i-H 




CM 


c 






CTi 


LO 


t^. 




"* 


CC' 






• 


• 






vO 


• 








• 


• 




CT) 


• 






o 


LO 


to 




• 


"5* 






rsi 


vO 


^* 




• 


■^f 






LO 


tO 


"3- 




to 








LO 


to 


•* 




to 








vO 


CM 


^r 




LO 


r-~ 






to 


to 


00 




00 

CT) 


>o 






tO 


CD 


*o 




• 


^r 






LO 


o 


r~- 






X) 






•st 


CM 


to 




CM 








^r 


to 


to 




CM 








r-« 


"* 


i-H 




i-H 


o 






i-H 


^ 


to 




to 

*3" 


1 — 1 






"N 


cr. 


\£> 




• 


<st 






<!a- 


a 


r-~ 






sO 






•<* 


CM 


to 




to 




1 — \ 

a> 




•sj- 


to 


to 




to 




1/] 

H 
03 

o 
>, 

CC: 

1 




e 


S 










o 




E 


£ 














S3 


3 










•H 




3 


3 










T3 




E 


5 




, — 






mh 




E 


S 




, — • 






H 




•H 


•H 










MH 




•H 


•H 




• 






O 




X 


C 




C 






o 




X 


c 




c 






o 




/-v aJ 


•H 




i — i 




i-H 




t — ' 


03 


•H 




1 — 1 




— 1 


(D 




Pu s 




s 


X 

.—1 


v ~' 




i — 1 

o5 


X 


3 


S 


^ 


X 

1—1 


1 — ' 




1 — 1 


fH 


-r 


^ X 


XX 


C 


i-H 


CM 


•H 




X 


XX 


c 


i—l 


14-1 


rH 


vO 


r— 1 


1 — 1 


+-> 


o 


rt 


2 


c_> 




<— i 


>— 1 


+J 


o 


03 


3 


i-H 


CT, 


<D -H 


■H 


c 


•H 


+-> 


O 


^ — ' 





•H 


• H 


c 


•H 


+-> 


O 


nj 


•—< 


M as 


rt 


o 


4-> 


o 


e 




^H 


OS 


nJ 


o 


■M 


O 


C CH 


1 


3 a 


Q 


s: 


rt 


H 


CO 


(D 


D 


Q 


Q 


s 


cd 


H 


CO 


2 


r-- 


+j 






fj 






?H 


+-> 








4-> 






C 


CT) 


as • 


• 


• 


• H 




• 


O 


xA 




■ 


• 


•H 


• 




c 


'50 


5-i bo 


CX 


bC 


pV 


w> 


be 


E 


U 


W) 


M 


M 


■Z- 


bO 


bOCO 


1 — 1 


CD > 


> 


> 


•H 


> 


> 


•H 


<D 


> 


> 


> 


•H 


> 


> 


■ — ' 




CX< 


< 


< 


'J 


< 


< 


■l-J 


Qh< 


< 


< 


'J 


< 


< 






E 






<D 






i— ( 


E 








a) 










<L> 






Fh 






03 


Oj 








Fh 










E- 






Cr- 






0Q 


H 








Z- 













i-H 




cu 




TJ 


1 


c 


Fh 


3 


<D 


Fh 


+-> 


< 


c 




1 — 1 


QJ 




C 


Ch 


c 


•H 


< 


X 




W 


1 


T3 




C 


+-) 


(D 


Fh 


•H 


O 


Fh 


a. 


PL, 


Fh 


^ — * 


•H 




< 


<D 




Fh 


r— ( 


O 


oS 


E 


c 


•H 


o 


4-> 


•H 


i-H 


4-> 


03 


03 


CQ 


C 









LO 




CC' 


O 


CM 


o 


to 


LO 


«* 


LO 


to 


L0 


vO 


-r 


LO 


rt 


CM 


r~~ 


ct. 


00 


CT) 
CT) 


^H 


LO 


LO 


LO 


• 


LO 


^t 


CM 


to 


CM 




LO 


^r 


LO 


to 

i-H 


LO 


sD 


•^t 


LO 


• 


i — i 


L0 


to 


"3- 


to 




-r 


vD 


O 


00 
rH 


E-h 


CC 


LO 


r^ 


• 




vO 


«=t 


LO 


to 




vO 


VD 


i-H 


to 
to 


o 


CO 


t~- 


OO 






1^. 


LO 


\D 


to 




CJ 


o 


o 


CT) 

i-H 


c 


L0 


LO 


LO 


• 




CC 


\£> 


fv 


LO 




CM 


'sf 


00 


CM 
CM 


c 


r-~ 


o 


sO 






CC 


*C 


r~- 


** 




LO 


t 


L0 


CT. 
CM 


o 


to 


i-H 


CM 


• 




CC 


vO 


r^ 


to 




CT, 


CC 


•>* 


oo 

CT) 


o 


L0 


CM 


^r 


• 




r~- 


LO 


vO 


to 




00 


vO 


CM 


O 


1 — 1 


LO 


CM 


■st 






\£> 


"* 


LO 


to 




vO 


LO 


i-H 


CM 

oo 


CC 


to 


CM 


to 


• 


LO 


LO 


to 


** 


to 




LO 


00 


[^ 


CT) 

oo 


t-^ 


LO 


LO 


LO 




vO 


■^r 


CM 


to 


CM 




CM 


to 


oo 


to 


i-H 


^r 


LO 


^r 




sC 


-^r 


CM 


to 


to 





u 

oS 
X 

CO 





£ 


E 














3 


3 








T3 






E 


E 


/ — \ 






M 






•H 


•H 








O 






X 


c 


c 






o 




f — \ 


rt 


•H 


1 — 1 




i — i 


a> 







S 


2 X 

i-H 


v — ' 




a3 


Fh 


00 


' — ' 


X 


XX 


C 


■ — i 


4h 


i— i 


o 




rH 


i-H +J 


o 


oJ 


2 


^H 


CT, 


di 


•H 


•H C 


•H 


4-> 





cd 


i — i 


Fh 


03 


o3 O 


-M 





c 


t4H 


1 


■z 


a 


a 2 


oS 


^ 


w 


2 


c 


«J 






4-J 






O 


LO 


CT3 




• 


•H 






c 


CT) 


Fh 


bd 


bO bO 


SC- 


ex 


bO CO 


i— 1 


<U 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


^ — * 




P-,<d 


< < 


o 


< 


< 






E 

















0) 






Sh 










H 






a, 











•58- 



< 



U-l 
Q 



> 

o 

2 



E- 
U 
O 



H 

CO 



X 

>-3 



•-3 



< 



< 



< 






E- 

CO 



X 

Jh 

o 

E 
O 
00 
+-> 
C 
o 



i 

in 

-a 

x| 

o 

CO 



o r-- n- 



lo to rt 

vO 'r]- LO 



i — • r-~ r~~ 



<a- cm to 

OO \D N 



r- o cn 



rf h [SI 
t^ LO \Q 



NHN 



LO •— I fO 

vO ^ LO 



r-- r-» cm 



LL. 




E E 

3 3 

E E 

•H -H 

X C 

03 -H 

2 S X 
i— i 

X XX 

r- t H +-> 

•H -H C 

rt rt o 

cz a -^ 



00 
CN tO 



C7t 00 
bO i— I 



i— I \D LO MH 

. • • 00 • 

rf vO l/l • to 

Tf cm tO CM 



O CI LO LO 00 

r- 

vO "t LO 

LO tO ^J- CM 



O H vO to 

• • • O 

00 LO \£> 

\D rt LO tO 



i— t O •— • i— I O 

. . . to 

00 vO N 

r-~ lo \D to 



o o 
to 



CM (7i i— I r- I O 

• • • C7i 

^D to LO 

00 vO N tO 



rt LO O LO O 

• • . v£> 

oo lo r-- to 



cm o 



to 



tO CM 

00 . 



CM 



r-- lo 

. . . to • 

(Nl rH (N • rt 

LO tO rt to 



lo lo o cn oo 

. . . to • 

rt LO LO • rt 

rt CM tO CM 



C7i 00 rt (71 0O 

• • • (7) • 

CM LO rt • rt 

rt CN tO CM 



o X 

sD +-> 

C7i C 

■-• o 

" E 

.— i 

to rt 

(7) CM 



Cd 



as 
lw 

O 

c 

CO 



M M O0 
- > > > 

P-,< < < 

E 



^3 
Jh 
O 
U 
• H • • 

a, oo oo a, 
•H > > v — 
o < < 

H 

On 



c 

aJ 



X 

+-> 

c 

o 
U 

<u 
•p 

1/5 

O 

X 

a 

rH 

O 

Q 



0) 
00 

•H 
rH 

s 

u 



\£) \D vD 



\D vO \D 
\D rt LO 



00 o Ol 



h OM 
rt to to 



cm rt to 



00 00 00 
LO tO rt 



v£> LO 



en oo (7> 

\D rt LO 



00 N M 



(7i 00 (7) 



•"3- LO LO 



LO LO LO 

oo vo r~- 



i— I O rH 



r-» r-- r»- 

oo \q r-» 



rt LO O 



tO CM tO 

00 vO N 



lO vO \D 



LO tO rt 

l>» LO vD 



vO 0O N 

LO to rt 

vD rt LO 



O CM 



rt rt rt 
LO to rt 



O •* N 



N CO N 
rt CM tO 



00 oo to 



LO oo t~- 
rt CN tO 



E E 
3 3 
E E 



r-s rt 

CL, S 



CM 

vO rt 



LO tO 

rt r-l 



00 CM 
i— I 
• CM 



to 



r- E- 

CM 



to 



(7) O 

o 



to o 
rt 



CM O 



(7> O 
rt 



to 



(7i 

to 



(7i 
rt 



tO O 

cn • 

• to 
to 



LO LO 

(7i • 

. to 

CM 



lo cn 

LO • 

. to 

to 





■§ 

Q) 

o 
a> 

a 



o 

vO 

cn 



S X' 



to 

cn 



rt 
rt 
cn 



^ X Xj; c —i 

i— i i— i +_i o rt 

CD -H -H C -H 4-> 

!h rt rt o +-> o 

3 a a s rt e- 

•m +-> 

rt . . • .h 

J-l oo 00 00 Ph oo 

0) > > > . H > 

&,< < < O < 

E a> 

<U rH 

E- G. 



5 _ 

O 13 
C rH 

CO O 

o 

• <D 

oo a< 
> v — 
< 



o 

rH 

rt 



t/5 LO 
(/) "* 

cd cn 



X 

■M 

C 

O 

u 
to 

c 
c 

< 

c 
o 
o 
3 
C 









00 




r^ 


m 


i— 1 


vO 


t—^ 


LO 


«* 


LO 


r- 


CN 


C 


>* 


LO 


to 


CM 


o 


r- 


^ 


oo 

00 


C7i 


L0 


r- 


vO 


• 


CN 


-t 


CM 


to 


CM 




CM 


cr^ 


<—i 


LO 

rH 


LO 


r^ 


■o 


r^ 




rH 


LO 


to 


rt 


to 




•^ 


(M 


oo 




E- 


a. 


sD 


r>- 


• 




\£> 


-r 


LO 


CM 




'nT 


vO 


o 


O 
LO 


O 


(7i 


vD 


00 


• 




r- 


LO 


vO 


to 




to 


^H 


CM 


cn 
to 


o 


LO 


to 


^r 


• 




M 


£) 


r-- 


n- 




r- 1 


cc 


o 


(7i 

cn 


o 


r^ 


^ 


vO 


• 




co 


vC 


t^. 


to 




r^ 


c 


cn 


to 

CM 


o 


to 


a 


i— i 


• 




•X 


vO 


t^» 


to 




LO 


L0 


o 


to 


o 


CM 


^H 


CM 


• 




r^ 


LO 


\C> 


CM 




O) 


O) 


cn 




to 


LT, 


rH 


to 


• 




vO 


^ 


LO 


CM 




O 


to 


o 


LO 
CM 


00 


•* 


to 


^t 




to 


LO 


to 


■nJ" 


to 




CM 


a 


VD 




CM 


vO 


r~- 


v£> 


• 


vO 


-T 


n 


to 


CM 




-t 


C7, 


h- 


(7i 

LO 


^1- 


r i 


-* 


to 




r~- 


-rt 


CM 


to 


CM 





X c c 

, — v d -h i— i 

tu S S X^ 

» rH 

^— ' X XX Ch 

I— I rH 4-1 O (8 

-H -H C -H +-» 

!h rt rt O P o 

3 a a s: rt e- 



i 

00 

•> LO 

tO CT) 

LO rH 

cn 
i— i o 

C 

• 3 





rt 

'-+H 

2 
O T3 

C rH 

CO o 

o 



LO oo 
i cn \D 

cn 



rt • • • 
5h oo oo oo 
> > > 
Cu< < < 





a 



Ph 00 
•H > 

u < 


rH 

a. 



. o 

oo a< co Q 



-59- 



c 
o 
u 



Q 
CD 
E-« 
O 



eg 

CO 



W 

O 



_3 

< 

2 



U 
Q 



> 

O 



U 
O 



E- 

o, 

CO 



CJ3 



X 

>-3 



2 

*~3 



X 

< 



OS 

a, 
< 



a: 
< 






< 









LO 




0> 


CO: 


CT> 


LO 


-r 


Lfi 


LO 


LO 


*tf 


cr, 


vC 


^ 


LO 


■* 


rH 


to 


to 


co 


oo 
to 


r- 


LO 


CO 


vO 


. 


to 


"* 


CM 


to 


to 




(Nl 


to 


to 


to 
<3- 


CM 


r-- 


r^ 


r- 


. 


i— i 


LO 


to 


«* 


to 




■— i 


00 


LO 


LO 
(NJ 


i-H 


C7, 


r-- 


oo 


. 




vO 


■<t 


LO 


to 




r-~ 


vD 


(ni 


to 


o 


en 


CO' 


Cn 


• 




r- 


LO 


\d 


to 




o 


LO 


00 




o 


.c 


LO 


LO 






CO 


vO 


I s - 


** 




CO 


cn 


^J- 


1— 1 


c 


r~- 


*c 


r-. 


> 




CC 


vC 


r~- 


"d- 




r- 


c 


CT) 


to 

00 


o 


to 


(Nl 


CN] 






CO 


•-C 


r~- 


to 




r~- 


o 


^3- 


CM 


o 


LO 


to 


^t 






l^- 


LO 


vO 


<tf 




to 


^H 


(Nl 


■* 


I — 1 


• 


• 




LO 


• 


LO 


to 


<tf 






vO 


-3- 


LO 


to 




Cn 


CM 


r—i 


(Nl 
00 


LO 


CM 


to 


to 


. 


-r 


LO 


K) 


<tf 


to 




LO 


LO 


LO 


i-H 

c 


cn 


LO 


r- 


<o 


• 


^1- 


-1- 


CM 


to 


to 




o 


co 


a> 




O) 


to 


sD 


<3- 


• 


-3- 


"3- 


CM 


to 


to 





r-- to lo 



r-~ lo 



-r 


o 


CM 


r-- 


ai 


vO 


<tf 


LO 


to 


CM 


r- 


CO 


00 


CM 

o 


o 


CM 


CM 


(Nl 


• 


I s - 


-r 


CM 


to 


to 




CO 


vO 


CM 


rH 


00 


LO 


CM 


^r 


. 


i-H 


LO 


to 


Tf 


to 




r~- 


"* 


^o 


to 


O 


t-~ 


i— ( 


Tf 






vO 


-r 


LO 


(Nl 




CM 


C 


vO 


1 — 1 

LO 


O 


CO 


to 


LO 


. 




r-~ 


LO 


vO 


to 




vD 


o 


oo 


en 

CM 


o 


rf 


I — 1 


(Nl 


• 




co 


\0 


I s - 


^f 




\D 


vD 


\o 


I s - 


c 


LO 


i-H 


tO 


. 




co 


vO 


r-. 


CM 




cn 


cr, 


en 


to 

LO 


o 


CM 


*C 


en 


• 




CO 


LO, 


^o 


to 




to 


I s - 


o 


r-. 

CM 


o 


^r 


r- 


i-H 


• 




f» 


-t 


^o 


to 




cn 


cn 


*-*■ 


o 

1— 1 


H 


**t 


r- 


I— 1 


. 




\£> 


to 


LO 


to 




Tf 


to 


en 


00 

to 


cr, 


to 


CO 


o 


• 


LO 


LO 


CM 


'St 


to 




^r 


vO 


o 


I s - 


cr, 


• 


• 


• 


LO 




CM 


1 — 1 


CM 


• 


I s - 


"3" 


CM 


to 


CM 




LO 


I s - 


i-H 


en 


C 


o 


cr, 


O 


• 


■O 


■=* 


rH 


to 


CM 











r-~ 




■*t 


to 


en 


"* 


o 


r- 


•^r 


LO 


to 


r~- 


\o 


<* 


LO 


"%r 


^H 


I s - 


CM 


o 


o 


■^t 


vD 


r>. 


f-. 


• 


to 


■^t 


CM 


to 


to 




r— 1 


o 


\D 


en 

o 


vO 


CO' 


LO; 


O 


• 




L0 


to 


i* 


to 





rH f-H VO 
OWN 

n ^t in 



^o LO 



tO 00 vO 

1^ I— I ^J- 

N Lf) vO 



LO O 00 



vD H 



\Q \Q ^D O O 

• • . 00 

O \D M 

00 LO v£5 to 



LO O 



\D tO LO 


. 




oo \o r- 


LO 




Tj" rH 00 




cc 


00 LO \D 


• 




00 ^O N 


^r 





00 \D t-. rH O 

• • • 00 

'H- O CM 

00 \0 I s to 



CM 

'* 



vo lo vD en E- 1 

to 
r^ rH rt 
\0 "^f lo to 



moo to en 

. . . t\ . 

LO CM Tj- -tO 

LO tO ^ to 



. . . r- . 

N \D >C ■ ■«* 

rf (Nl tO (Nl 



LO LO O LO ^3" 

CM 
U~) \£) \Q • *t 

rf CM tO to 



CO 



+-» 

c 

o 
u 















o 














vO 




E 

3 


| 








cr. 

- — i 




e 


e 


• N 






i 




•H 


•H 


• 






r- 




X 


C 


c 






to 


^ — s 


rt 


•H 


H 




rH 


cr, 


IX, 
J 


S 


, — 1 


^- ' 




i-H 


i — i 
i 


v — ' 


X 


XX 


c 


i — i 


4h 






1 — 1 


•—t +-) 


o 


rt 


3 


T3 


0) 


■H 


■H C 


•H 


4-1 


o 


rH 


rH 


rt 


rt O 


4-» 


o 


c 


o 


3 


Q 


a 2 


aJ 


H 


CO 


u 


4-1 






+J 






0) 


rt 




• • 


•H 




• 


ai 


rH 


M 


00 oo 


Ph 


bO 


bo 


- — * 


03 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 




&H< 


<c < 


O 


< 


< 




E 






d» 








o 






rH 








H 






a. 









>. 



=3 13 



fc s S x- 



— ' X XX 

T—\T—\l-i 

a> -h -h c 

h (i! aJ O 

C3 a a 2 

4-> 

aJ • • • 

(h 

0) 



oo oo OO 
> > > 

Ph<C < < 

e 

H 



en 

LO 

en 



as 
!-3 



oo 
en 



rH <4H 

03 ^ 

+-* O xl 

O C u 

H CO o ' 

o o 

• ■ <u 0) 
OO O0c£ Q 
> > w 

< < 



(/) 



00 
rH 

o 

o 

0) 

u 

c 

•H 
rH 

CL 



r« 
fH 

03 

c_ 

<u 
oo 

0) 



£ E 

D 3 



X c 
, — v n! ,H 
U. S S X' 



X XX 



c 



0) 
2 

a) "^r 

JO LO 

en 
i/> >— ' 

X 
■p 

O o3 

rH S ^ 
M LO "? 

en ^h 



>. 



o3 03 
Q a 



03 

rH MH 

03 5 



OO OO OO 

> > > 



(=l,< <d < 

E 

H 



+-> O C rH 

o3 H CO o ° 

•h • • a) en 

Oh 00 OO Qi r_ ' 

■H > > v_/ 

o < < 

(U 

rH 



-60- 



<-< T3 



C 
O 

u 



a 

CU 
O 



CU 
CO 



a: 

cu 

n: 

H 

O 



< 



u 
cu 
a 



> 

o 



H 
U 
O 



E- 
a, 

CO 



< 



1-3 



CU 






a, 

< 



< 



CU 

CL. 









tt 




to 


CM 


to 


<?r 


Tf 


to 


to 


to 


LO 


o 


\D 


Tl- 


LO 


«tf 


(N 


cn 


** 


vO 


i—( 
LO 


r>- 


i — I 


LO 


fO 


• 


to 


tJ- 


CN 


to 


to 




f*. 


i— 1 


en 


en 
to 


cn 


to 


Tl- 


to 


• 




LO 


tO 


■* 


to 




t-O 


CM 


00 


\0 
CM 


i — i 


vO 


LO 


LO 


• 




vO 


Tf 


LO 


to 




i— l 


o 


vO 


cm 

LO 


o 


t~>- 


vO 


^o 






r^ 


LO 


vO 


to 




i — i 


i — i 


vO 


CM 
Tf 


o 


«!* 


to 


to 


• 




CC 


v£> 


r^ 


"tf 




cn 


Tl" 


i— i 


o 

00 


o 


LO 


tt 


LO 


• 




CC 


\o 


r^ 


Tt 




vO 


r^ 


h> 


to 

CM 


c 


1 — 1 


en 


o 


• 




CO 


LO 


r^ 


Tf 




\£> 


i—i 


to 


to 


c 


to 


i— i 


CM 


• 




r-» 


LO 


v© 


«!t 




cn 


en 


cn 


oo 

LO 


^H 


CM 


c 


i— i 






VO 


■5* 


LO 


to 




LO 


en 


r>- 


en 
en 


vO 


o 


o 


o 




LO 


LO 


to 


ti- 


to 




CTl 


Ti- 


CM 


oo 


CN 


1 — 1 


Tt 


to 


• 


LO 


<tf 


CM 


to 


CM 




\£) 


vO 


vC 


-5f 


co 


01 


to 


■— I 




tI- 


to 


^J 


to 


to 











<* 










to 




** 


CO 


1— 1 


oo 


00 


to 


CM 


to 


to 


vO 


r~ 


o 


en 


tj- 


t^. 


Tf 


CM 


to 


r^ 


CM 


vO 


LO 


LO 


<* 




^D 


-t 


LO 


to 


to 


CT; 


LO 


CM 


CM 

en 


'* 


CM 


o 


1 — 1 


to 


cn 


'CO 


to 


.— i 




1—1 


i—l 


LO 


to 


> 


LD 


Tj" 


to 


"* 


CM 




T}- 


CM 


to 


CM 




"tf 


1—1 


to 


«* 


I—l 


CM 


to 


00 


\0 


LO 


• 


• 


• 


CM 


• 


• 


• 


• 


vD 


• 


en 


to 


1— 1 


• 




to 


"5t 


to 


• 


^H 


LO 


Tf 


LO 


to 




LO 


to 


Tf 


CM 




CM 


cn 


i—l 


r-- 


E- 


vO 


■^ 


o 


i—l 


E- 


• 




• 


to 




• 


• 




Tf 




O 


to 


CM 






oo 


to 


vO 


• 




r^ 


LO 


vO 


to 




vO 


Tl- 


LO 


CM 




cn 


Tf 


[*- 


to 

00 


o 


tt 


tO 


en 


00 


C 


o 


Tf 


CM 






oo 


to 


LO 


• 




co 


vO 


r-. 


to 




r^ 


LO 


o 


CM 




00 


CM 


o 


LO 

o 


o 


00 


to 


vO 


O 
LO 


o 


LO 


o 


oo 






<*■ 


o 


CM 


• 




co 


r^ 


r~. 


LO 




00 


vO 


r^ 


to 




i— ( 


vO 


-«t 


LO 

o 


o 


LO 


to 


en 


1—1 

Tj- 


o 


r^ 


i— I 


en 






\D 


■— H 


to 






CO 


t^- 


r- 


LO 




00 


\D 


t~~ 


tO 




CO 


r^ 


to 


1 — 1 

to 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


i — i 


en 


o 


to 


\o 


LO 






CM 


h> 


o 






CO 


vO 


h- 


to 




00 


CO 


f» 


to 




I—l 


vO 


en 


en 


o 


r^ 


o 


en 


o 
Ti- 


H 


\D 


1^ 


\D 


• 




LO 


o 


CM 






r-^ 


LO 


o 


to 




r-. 


LO 


vO 


to 




LO 


CN 


en 




E- 


00 


to 


1—1 


1—1 


co 


O 


r-~ 


v£> 


• 




^t 


1 — 1 


to 


• 




SO 


ti- 


LO 


to 




vO 


"3- 


LO 


to 




i— 1 


CO 


LO 


i— 1 

o 


r^ 


CM 


00 


o 


■—1 
en 


O 


LO 


r-~ 


v£> 




I—l 


r— 1 


c 


I—l 




cn 


LO 


to 


<* 


«tf 




LO 


to 


^r 


to 




to 


LO 


en 


LO 

I—l 


to 


00 


to 


vO 




CM 


CO 


< — i 


en 




CM 


to 


LO 


<* 




CO 


-t 


to 


to 


to 




T)- 


CM 


to 


CM 




co 


CO 


to 


LO 


to 


00 


\0 


CM 


LO 

LO 


CM 


"-O 


1— 1 


en 


• 


CM 


o 


to 


CM 


> 


r-^ 


-f 


to 


to 


to 




Tf 


CM 


to 


CM 







aJ 

Ph 

C 

•H 

O 



o 

*4-l 

c 
o 

<D 



< 
co 



X 

+-i 

c 
~ 
o 

u 
o 

'+H 

a 
X 



a 
o 

c 

•H 

O 

C 
o 











o 










vO 


e 


E 






en 
,—i 


3 


3 








E 


E 


/ — \ 




vO 


•H 


•H 


• 




to 


X 


c 


c 




CT> 


^s as 


•H 


1 — 1 




i— i 

" i—l 
i—l 


ou S 


S X 


V — ' 




> 


1—1 






rt . 


'— ' X 


XX 


c 


^H 


CH ' 


1—1 


^H 4-> 


o 


rt 


CO g 


<D -H 


•H C 


•H 


*J 


U 03 


o3 O 


-M 


o 


3 a 


a s 


a 


E-i 


+-> 




•p 




boC. 


aJ • 

fn GO 


M bo 


•H 
ft 


bO 


0) > 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


Ph< 


< < 


O 


< 


< 


E 




0) 






(L) 




^H 






H 




0h 







X 

■(-> 

3 
O 

u 



E E 



PL, S S X' 



X XX 
1—1 1—1 +J 

•H -H C 

a3 03 O 



a3 

.-I C|_| 

03 2 
■M O 

o c 



o 

?H 

3 a Q S 03 H CO 

03 
U 
<D > > > 

p-,< < < 



00 M M a M M 



•H > > 
O < < 
0) 

a. 



c 

o 
u 

X 

c 

o3 
bO 
CO 



< 



3 3 



E 


E 


, — ^ 






* LO 


•H 


•H 


. 






^ ^O 


X 


c 


C 






■-• cn 


,— s o3 


•H 


i—i 




i—i 


3 r-H 


CL, 2 


S X 


» — ' 




i—i 


^3 


3 


i— i 






03 


CO 


^ X 


XX 


c 


i — 1 


CM 


i c 


I—l 


r-H 4-» 


o 


rt 


S 


3 


0) -H 


■H C 


•H 


+-> 


o 


-p ^» 


^ o3 


03 O 


4-> 


o 


c 


H I 


3 Q 


a s: 


03 


H 


CO 


O r- 


■M 




4-> 






O *f 


03 • 


• 


•H 


. 


• 


<u cn 


^h bO 


bO bC 


Oh 


CJj 


bC 


Cm 1-1 


0) > 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


^— / 


Q*< 


< < 


O 


< 


< 




E 




(L) 








a> 




^ 








E-i 




Cm 









■61- 



X 






H 






t—t 






S: 






co 






2 






o 






1— 1 






H 






< 






U 






O 






J 






Q 






UJ 


CO 




H 


CO 




U 


UJ 




UJ 


hJ 




J 


2 




UJ 


3 




CO 


c 




E- 


vO 




< 


ct> 


• 




r— 1 


-o 


hJ 


1 


— 


J 


i—l 


4-> 


< 


tO 


c 


u. 


CTi 


o 


s 


1— 1 


u 


o 




' — ' 


2 






CO 




Q 




Q 


UJ 


a 


2 


E- 


^ 


< 
X 


O 
2 


2 


e: 


UJ 


o 


< 


CO 


1— 1 


*=^ 


l—l 


E- 




3: 


< 


u- 


oi 


E- 1 


o 


UJ 


I-H 




X 


CL, 


UJ 


E- 


i — i 


E- 


O 


U 


< 




UJ 


E- 




cc: 


CO 




D- 


LU 




*» 


X 




w 


E- 




cs 






3 






E-< 






3 






w 






Cu 






2 






UJ 






H 






UJ 






U 






< 






Qi 






UJ 






> 






< 







r-- 

st 



o 

2 



UJ 



■M 

C 
3 

o 

U 

a> 

c 



X 

l—l 
0) 
DO 

■H 

Ci 

c 

o 

•M 

c 
a 



CC 


r^ 


CN 


CT) 


h- 


«o 


LO 


vO 


*st 


L0 


vO 


s* 


LO 


■st 


i — l 


vO 


ct> 


O0 


o 


c 


\o 


cc 


[-» 


• 


to 


st 


CN 


to 


to 




to 


vO 


o 


CN 
<=t 


LO 


oo 


r-. 


00 






LO 


to 


st 


to 




CTi 


^. 


st 


to 

c 


i-H 


CT> 


vO 


oo 






vO 


-f 


LO 


to 




to 


r^ 


o 


LO 


c 


c 


r- 


CT) 






QC 


LO 


vO 


S* 




to 


to 


to 


to 


- 


• 


• 


• 


vO 




VO 


st 


LO 


• 




cc 


vO 


t-«. 


st 




r^ 


CN 


o 


to 

LO 


o 


t~. 


vO 


r-» 






CC 


vO 


r-. 


st 




u-, 


O 


to 


vO 


o 


• 


■ 


• 


00 




st 


CN 


to 


• 




cc 


vO 


r*> 


to 




*st 


o 


r- 


CT) 

Csl 


c 


vC 


to 


st 






r-^ 


LO 


vO 


"=* 




st 


CT) 


r». 


LO 
CN 


^H 


LO 


1 — 1 


to 






vO 


st 


LO 


to 




r^ 


CT) 


to 


vO 


st 


st 


to 


Sit 


• 


to 


LO 


to 


sj 


to 




cc 


00 


to 


CT) 


r-^ 


LO 


>C 


vO 


• 


st 


st 


CN 


to 


cn 




- — ( 


r-^ 


rr 


00 

oo 


CT) 


o 


CO 


[*- 


• 


to 


st 


CN 


to 


to 







3 


3 










e 


E 


/ — \ 








•H 


•H 


• 








X 


C 


C 








cd 


■ H 


l-H 




i — i 


u- 

> 


S 


i-H 


' — ' 




i — i 
cd 




X 


XX 


c 


i — l 


<4H 




i—i 


>-H -M 


o 


rt 


5 


<L> 


•H 


■H C 


■H 


+-> 





h 


rt 


cS O 


♦J 





C 


3 


Q 


Q S 


0} 


^~ 


L0 



X 

+J 

c 

3 
o 
u 

*■> 

o 
£i 

• — I 



Ctf . . . . H • • 

Jh GO 00 DO CTl, &0 bfi 

CD > > > -H > > 
P-,< < < o < < 

e <u 

a> ^ 

E- a. 









LO 




^r 


■st 


"St 


\D 


CN 


kO 


vO 


vO 


"St 


L0 


sC 


-t 


LO 


"^t 


.—1 


, ^- 


to 


C7i 


to 

r— 1 


CO 


\D 


en 


\D 




CN 


-t 


CM 


to 


to 




r^ 


i — i 


Ol 


to 

LO 


r^ 


r^. 


CO' 


t^ 






LO 


to 


^r 


to 




r~- 


X 


to 


00 
i-H 


H 


CO 


r-. 


oo 






\D 


^d- 


LO 


to 




t^- 


vo 


CN 


LO 


O 


O) 


CO 


CI 






t^- 


L0 


\0 


to 




r^ 


LO 


vO 


to 

o 


o 


LO 


LO 


LO 


• 




cc 


^O 


t^. 


LO 




L0 


1 — 1 


to 




o 


r^- 


r- 


r-^ 


. 




M 


vO 


h>. 


"St 




o, 


LO 


CN 


vO 

to 


o 


to 


CM 


to 






CO 


\D 


r^ 


to 




co 


vO 


r^ 


oo 

00 


o 


LO 


to 


■si- 


• 




r*» 


L0 


v£3 


to 




t^ 


LO 


vO 


00 
Tl- 


CN 


L0 


to 


^r 






C 


■^t 


LO 


tO 




to 


to 


to 


LO 


to 


"Tj- 


-T 


'St 




to 


LO 


to 


^f 


to 




"St 


CTl 


CN 


LO 


•St 


^ 


t^- 


r~> 


• 


~r 


"* 


CM 


to 


CN 




01 


CN 


\D 




CO 


-i- 


CO 


^O 


• 


to 


-t 


CN 


to 


to 





3 3 

E 6 ^ 

•H -H 

X c c 

/ — v Cti -H l—l i-H 

U- S S X 1 -' -h 

o i— i cd 

— ' X XX C h (w 

i-H ■— i +-> O aj 2 

fn a3 aJ O +-> O C 

3 Q a S 03 E- CO 

03 • • 



U DO 00 DO 
> > > 

Ph< < < 

E 
CO 



D, DO DO 
•H > > 
O < < 
CO 
Jh 

a. 



x 

c 

o 

u 









LO 




\D 


^f 


LO 


to 


r^ 


LO 


to 


st 


LO 


c 


vO 


-r 


LO 


st 


CN 


CN 


to 


to 


CT) 

i-H 


CO' 


-t 


vO 


LO 


• 


to 


■st 


CN 


to 


to 




i-H 


vO 


^r 


LO 
LO 


— 1 


vD 


"St 


LO 


• 


-H 


LO 


to 


st 


to 




v£> 


st 


LO 


to 

CN 


^H 


CO 


-r 


vO 


. 




O 


st 


LO 


to 




r~- 


Oi 


oo 


LO 


o 


Ol 


LO, 


r-« 






r- 


LO 


vO 


to 




i-H 


Oi 


LO 


CN 

o 


c 


vO 


CN 


st 






CO 


\o 


r~- 


LO 




CTl 


LO 


CN 


LO 

to 


o 


f> 


"St 


vo 






co 


VO 


r~- 


st 




c 


vO 


00 


vO 

CTi 


c 


■st 


CTl 


i-H 






CO 


LO 


r-> 


to 




t-- 


CO 


to 


LO 


a 


• 


« 


• 


CN 




LO 


O 


to 


• 




r-- 


LO 


vO 


st 




CTl 


r^ 


oo 


O 
vO 


.— i 


■st 


c 


CN 


• 




vO 


st 


LO 


to 





0O Sf H 



CT) 



CN 


i — 1 


CN 


• 


LO 


LO 


to 


st 


st 




CN 


CTl 


vO 


CT) 
CT) 


co 


■st 


st 


st 


• 


LO 


st 


CN 


to 


CN 




st 


■—i 


00 


\0 
st 


r-~ 


CN 


LO 


to 


• 


-r 


st 


OJ 


to 


to 







| 


E 
3 










£ 


E 


/ — \ 








•H 


•H 










X 


c 


C 








03 


•H 


i — i 




i-H 


PL. 
> 


2 


S X 

i-H 


'*-' 




CO 




X 


XX 


c 


i-H 


4H 




i — i 


i-H +-> 





cd 


S 


a) 


•H 


•H C 


■H 


+-> 


o 


U 


cn 


03 O 


■M 


o 


c 


~ 


Q 


Q S 


cd 


- 


CO 


*j 






*j 






cd 


• 


• ■ 


•H 




• 


u 


cc 


DO DO 


^H 


DO 


oj: 


<D 


> 


> > 


■H 


> 


> 


CU< 


< < 


U 


< 


< 


E 






o 






<D 






h 






— 






a. 







CO 
DO 
cd 

Ph 
DO 

c 

•H 

o 



o 

CM 

c 
o 

a> 

3 

C 



•62- 



E- 



co 



E- 






< 






U 






O 






-J 






Q 






PJ 


CO 




H 


CO 




U 


PJ 




pj 


J 




J 


Z 




pj 


3 




CO 


o 




E- 


vD 




< 


cr 


• 




i— i 


T3 


j 


i 


- 


j 


i—i 


+-> 


< 


to 


C 


u. 


CT> 


O 


S: 


i— i 


u 


O 






z 






CO 


• • 


Q 




Q 


PJ 


Q 


Z 


E- 


^ 


< 

-J 
X 


O 
Z 


z 


o£ 


PJ 


o 


< 


co 


1— 1 


s 


i— i 


H 




s 


<c 


PL. 


oc 


t— ' 


o 


PJ 


1 — 1 




X 


CI. 


w 


E- 


1— 1 


H 


O 


u 


< 




— 


E- 




Ci 


CO 




Q, 


PJ 










— 


H 




DC 






:z> 












< 






(v; 






PJ 






a. 






2 






UJ 







PJ 
> 






o 

z 



w 



+-> 

c 

3 
o 

u 

& 
o 

■H 

o 

PL. 









to 




"3- 


O 


r> 


00 


to 


^ 


to 


to 


o 


i—l 


•o 


Tt 


LO 


^r 


CM 


o 


•^f 


CM 


CT 


CC 


• 


• 


• 


00 


• 


to 


LO 


^r 


• 


to 


"* 


CM 


to 


CM 




r- 


\0 


CM 


to 

cr 


C7l 


-r 


to 


"<* 






LO 


to 


"3" 


CM 




CM 


o 


vO 


to 

i—l 


i—l 


r^ 


<tf 


LO 


• 




<C 


Ti- 


LO 


to 




i — i 


^r 


00 


CM 
<* 


o 


co 


LO 


vO 


• 




r-- 


LO 


vO 


to 




00 


o 


CT 


o 
to 


c 


<!t 


to 


to 


• 




co 


vO 


r-*. 


<tf 




v£> 


LO 


so 


CM 

en 


o 


vO 


"* 


LO 






CO 


<D 


r^ 


to 




r-^ 


a, 


to 


o 

sD 


o 


CM 


cr> 


i-H 






CO 


LO 


r^ 


to 




vO 


LO 


vO 


i—( 

en 


o 


"3- 


3 


CM 






r-~ 


LO 


vO 


to 




CM 


CM 


CM 




o 


^r 


c 


CM 






vo 


"3- 


LO 


to 




LO 


t^ 


i— ( 


to 

LO 


CM 


- — i 


o 


1—1 






IT, 


to 


tt 


to 




to 


1 — 1 


h- 


LO 
LO 


to 


to 


■3- 


to 


. 


LO 


•%r 


CM 


to 


CM 




LO 


to 


cr 


oo 


00 


t— 4 


-r 


CM 


• 


LO 


^ 


CM 


to 


CM 





as -H 



Cu S S X' 
:> i—i 

> -' X XX 



CD -H -H C 

L( U c« O 

3 a a s 

nj ■ • • -h • ■ 

?h im m oo a m m 



as 

CH 
•H -M O 

+-> o c 

a} H CO 



rt 



> > > 

cx< < < 

E 

CD 

E- 



> > 

< < 



X 

o 

X 

M 





bO 

■M 
L0 
O 

Sh 
Lb 



vD 


iH 


00 




v£> 


i — l 


c 


o 

LO 


■—1 


00 


i—i 

o 


to 

CM 


1—1 

to 


00 
CM 


LO 

O 


oo 
o 

LO 


vO 

CM 

to 


i—i 


i—l 
vO 

CM 


to 


CT 


LO 

CN 


to 

LO 


to 
to 

to 


, ^- 


LO 

LO 


LO 

1—1 
LO 


LO 

to 


CT 
i— I 

to 


o 


LO 
l— ( 

oc 


CM 

CC 
LO 


CT, 
CT 


00 

o 
"3- 


o 


CM 

to 

CO 


LO 

CT. 
LO 


to 


i-H 

to 


cr 


co 

CT, 


CO: 

LO 
LO 


oo 
vO 


LO 

to 

"3" 


o 


to 




o 
c 


to 
to 


E- 


i— i 


to 


oo 

CT 


LO 

to 


LO 

i-H 


LO 

00 


CM 


i — I 

oo 
to 


LO 

CT 

to 


CM 

i-H 
i— 1 


o 

1 — 1 

*3- 


CO 

^^ 
CM 


i— i 

to 


o 

LO 
CM 


c 
o 

1 — 1 


LO 

to 


i—( 

CM 

CM 


00 

o 
to 


i—t 

to 


1 — 1 
1— I 



3 3 

E E 

•H -H 

X c 

PL. S S X 



X XX 



rt 



o 

■P O C 

aj E-, co 

4-> 



fn M 


M M 


ex 


bO 00 


<U > 


> > 


•H 


> > 


cx<t: 


<: < 


o 


< <c 


E 




<D 




cu 




a. 





X 

■p 

c 

O 
'-J 

C 
O 
+-> 

c 

H 

CO 



C 
2 
O 
fJ 
t/1 

CU 

W) 

ctf 
X 



o 
o 

>H 



a> 



tO CM CM 

vO •* LO 



lo oo r-. 



00 

o 



r-- rj- 
to CM 



vO 



CM 


-t 


to 


. 


LO 


-t 


CM 


to 


CM 




r^ 


LO 


^o 


CM 


1 — 1 


to 


to 


to 




< — 1 


LO 


to 


"3- 


CM 




r- 


o 


00 


CM 

o 


H 


£> 


to 


^r 


• 




vO 


Tl- 


LO 


to 




--O 


CO 


r~- 


to 

o 


O 


h> 


to 


LO 






r-- 


LO 


^O 


to 




to 


oc 


vO 


o 
o 


3 


'* 


c 


CM 


• 




00 


vO 


t^ 


^r 




to 


vO 


Tf 


o 

sO 


zz 


\o 


CM 


Tl" 


• 




-co 


vO 


r^ 


to 




1—1 


LO 


to 


LO 
LO 


o 


CM 


CO 


o 


• 




CC' 


LT, 


t^ 


to 




CTi 


o 


CT 


1—1 

o 


o 


to 


o 


i— t 


• 




r- 


LO 


\D 


<* 




to 


r^ 


LO 


LO 

o 


^f 


to 


CTl 


i— H 


. 




vD 


to 


LO 


to 




O 


CM 


vO 


00 

o 


i — i 


r— 1 


c 


o 


• 


\C 


LO, 


to 


Tj- 


to 




CT 


a> 


^r 


i-H 

o 


1 — 1 


CM 


to 


to 


• 


LO 


■>* 


CM 


to 


CM 




CO' 


o 


>* 


o 

LO 


-* 


O 


^t- 


CM 




vO 


-r 


OJ 


to 


CM 





F= 


E 








3 


3 








E 


E 


/ — \ 






•H 


•H 








X 


c 


C 






^-v CS 


•H 


i — i 




i— i 


PC S 
3 


S X 

1—1 


v — ' 




i-H 


^- X 


XX 


c 


- — i 


U-t 


i-H 


^H +J 


o 


aj 


2 


-H 


■H C 


•H 


*J 


O 


fn as 


a3 O 


4-J 


O 


c 


3 a 


a s 


as 


H 


CO 


+-> 




*J 






ca • 


• 


•H 


• 




f-t DO 


60 bO 


Ph 


cj; 


bO 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


cx< 


< < 


o 


< 


< 


E 




CD 






CD 




u 






E- 




a. 







CD 

bo 

as 

a, 

bO 

c 

•H 

o 



o 

a 
o 

T3 
CD 

3 

C 

•H 
•M 

c 
o 
o 



-63- 



X 



co 



E- 






< 






U 






O 






J 






Q 






PJ 


co 




E- 


CO 




U 


PJ 




PJ 


_} 




J 


2 




PJ 


3 




CO 


o 




E- 


vO 




< 


Cn 


• 




i— i 


T3 


J 


i 


— 


J 


.— I 


■M 


< 


to 


c 


PU 


Ot 


o 


S 


.— I 


u 


o 




" — ' 


2 






oo 




Q 




Q 


PJ 


a 


X 


H 
O 
2 


2 


ft 


PJ 


o 


< 


CO 


hH 


s 


1— 1 


E- 




3: 


< 


PU 


a: 


E- 


O 


UJ 


i— i 




X 


ft 


PJ 


E-i 


i— i 


E- 


O 


CJ 


< 




tu 


E- 




ft 


CO 




ft 


PJ 




•\ 


X 




UJ 


E- 




ft 






3 






H 






2 






PJ 






ft 






s 






pj 






E- 






PJ 






O 






3 






PJ 






> 






< 










PJ 



cn 

CM rt 00 i— I i— I 



c 

O 

u 

c 
o 

4-> 

00 

c 

■H 

(/) 

03 



"* 


cn 


i— 1 


r^ 


L0 


vD 


tO 


LO 


to 


CM 


Cn 


r^ 


to 


o 

LO 


to 


CM 


i— 1 


CM 


• 


LO 


^r 


CM 


to 


CM 




CM 


to 


to 


LO 
LO 


r— 1 


-T 


O 


CM 


• 


r— ( 


LO 


to 


*tf 


CM 




^r 


c 


CM 


00 
CM 


H 


CC 


o 


"* 


• 




vD 


^r 


LO 


to 




O 


to 


CM 


o 
cn 


c 


00 


o 


"* 


• 




r~~ 


L0 


v£> 


CM 




vD 


LO 


vO 


i-H 


o 


^d- 


CO 


i— i 






cc 


LO 


r-« 


to 




r~- 


^o 


CM 


CM 
LO 


o 


vO 


CT. 


to 


• 




00 


LO 


r~- 


to 




I— 1 


to 


r-- 


o 

00 


o 


CM 


LO 


00 






CC' 


LO 


v£5 


to 




C 


i— 1 


vO 


00 

oo 


E- 


"3- 


r-~ 


O 


• 




r^. 


tj- 


vO 


to 




t^ 


LO 


vO 


00 

o 


^ 


-r 


00 


i-H 


• 




v£3 


to 


LO 


to 




O 


^J- 


r-* 




i-H 


c 


r-^ 


oo 


. 


>c 


LO 


CM 


to 


to 




r-- 


\D 


CM 


o 

.—I 


o 


to 


CM 


to 




LO 


<* 


CM 


to 


CM 




v£> 


LO 


^o 


to 


CM 


i — i 


i — i 


1— 1 




t^ 


-r 


CM 


to 


CM 

















as 
















4-> 


• 














aS 


c 














-d 
















0) . •> 
















u o 


•V 














3 vo 


aS 














+-> CT> 


■P 


E 


E 










ai ^n 


aJ 


3 


3 










Jh 


T3 


6 


E 










d) • 




•H 


•H 










a, o 


C 


X 


C 










E a» 


o 


r~, OS 


•H 








i — i 


0) Q 


•H 


tL. S 


S 


X 






i — i 


E- " 


4-> /— > 







r-H 






aJ 


mo 


aS O 


w X 


XX 


C 


r- 1 


IH 


1 <3- 


4-> vD 


1—1 


i-H 


♦J 


o 


rt 


2 


a> 


•H O^ 


<D -H 


•H 


c 


•H 


+-> 


O 


-a ^h 


CL,rH 


U aJ 


rt 


o 


■M 


o 


C 


u 


•H 1 


3 Q 


Q 


S 


ri 


H 


CO 


O <D 


O i-H 


•»-> 






*J 






o C 


(D to 


aS • 






•H 


• 


. 


<D 3 


fn cr> 


!h do 


M 


W) 


ft 


M 


bCtX *-i 


P-. — 1 


<D > 


> 


> 


•H 


> 


> 


s — ^ 




ft< 


< 


< 


o 


< 


< 






£ 






o 










CD 






u 










E-i 






a 











4-> 

c 

3 

o 
u 

aS 



LO 









to 










1^ 




CO 


r~- 


to 


^r 


^1- 


\D 


i-H 


"St 


cn 


cc 


r~- 


\D 


t^- 


i-H 


O 


r>- 


LO 


vO 


vO 


r~~ 


\D 


-+ 


LO 


^t 


i-H 


\D 


-i- 


LO 


** 


i—i 


CT> 


CM 


VO 


CM 

a 


VO 


vO 


"5t 


LO 


'it 

CM 


■<* 


CO 


O 


cn 


• 


r-H 


r^ 


r- 


t-» 


• 


to 


■* 


to 


to 


CM 




"5t 


CM 


to 


to 




vO 


vO 


i-H 


to 


*tf 


o 


vO 


to 


i-H 

o 


r- 


00 


r-- 


oo 


• 




en 


LO 


1^ 


. 




LO 


to 


-* 


to 




LO 


to 


<* 


to 




r-. 


CO' 


to 


a, 

CM 


E-h 


to 


to 


to 


CM 


o 


<y> 


cc 


en 






o 


v£> 


oo 


• 




o 


■«tf 


LO 


to 




r^ 


-* 


LO 


to 




t— i 


vO 


"!t 




o 


o 


LO 


00 


CM 


o 


o 


CC 


at 






o 


r- 


oo 






cc 


LO 


vD 


CM 




00 


LO 


\£> 


^r 




o 


t^ 


a 


00 

en 


o 


en 


i-H 


c 


o 


o 


^ 


LO 


LO 






LO 


T 


LO 






CO 


VO 


r» 


LO 




oo 


u3 


l>- 


LO 




1^ 


'* 


i-H 


a 


o 


vO 


w, 


vo 


o 


o 


• 


• 


• 


oo 




• 


• 




CM 




CO 


r~- 


00 






r- 


LO 


^o 






CO 


\D 


r-- 


*3" 




00 


O 


r~. 


LO 




en 


CO 


Oi 


to 


o 


o 


^H 


MO 


cn 


o 


"* 


CM 


to 






•<* 


i-H 


CM 


• 




CC 


vO 


r^ 


to 




oo 


\£5 


r^ 


to 




r~- 


r i 


c 


CM 


o 


v£) 


LO 


\D 


i-H 


o 


• 


• 


> 


00 




• 


• 


• 


CM 




r~- 


-t 


vO 






vD 


CM 


^f 






r^ 


LO 


^D 


CM 




r^ 


LO 


vO 


<* 




to 


^* 


^f 


i— 1 
CM 


o 


r^ 


"sf 


1—1 


oo 

LO 


1—1 


cc 


^r 


\D 






r^ 


CM 


LO 






\0 


t 


LO 


to 




^D 


^r 


LO 


to 




LO 


cr> 


r-N 


to 


to 


LO 


LO 


o 


00 


00 


L0 


to 


•* 






^O 


to 


LO 




to 


L0 


to 


"^r 


to 




LO 


to 


<vT 


to 




CM 


LO 


-* 


o 


oo 


vO 


1— i 


cn 


o 


cn 


C7. 


CT> 


a 


> 


1—1 


oo 


r- 


t-^ 




^3- 


-si- 


CM 


to 


CM 




^3- 


CM 


to 


to 




I— ( 


CC 


o 


i-H 

Ot 


LO 


r~- 


O 


cn 


cn 

00 


cn 


& 


r-- 


r- 




"3- 


vO 


r-- 


v£> 




-r 


-r 


CM 


to 


CM 




-<*■ 


CM 


to 


to 





E E 

• H -H 

X c 

r- s OS -H 

PL. S S X' 

3 i-H 

^- ' X XX 



O aS 

•H -P 

+J o 

as H 



as 

o 

c 

CO 



0) -H -H C 

Jn aS aS O 

3 Q Q S 

+-> 

rt . . . 

U M M M ft M M 

a > > > 

ft< <c < 



> 

0- 



X 

+-> 

c 
- 

o 

a> 

i — i 
u 

rt 





E 


E 










3 


3 










e 


E 


/ — * 








•r-4 


• H 


• 








X 


c 


c 






/ — , 


rt 


• 1-1 


1 — 1 




i— ( 


3 


^. 


S X 

1 — 1 


' — ' 




i—l 

rt 


' — ' 


X 


XX 


c 


rH 


wH 




i-H 


.-I 4-> 


o 


aS 


2 





•H 


•H C 


•H 


4-1 


O 


'rH 


rt 


aS o 


+J 


O 


c 


3 


Q 


a 2 


as 


E-i 


L0 


+J 






+-> 






aJ 


• 




•H 


• 




h 


M 


DO DO 


ft 


DC 


DC 


0) 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


ft< 


< < 


o 


< 


< 


E 






0) 






o 






u 






H 






ft 







■64- 



H 






t— i 






2= 






CO 






z 






o 






1— 1 






H 






< 






CJ 






o 






-J 






Q 






uj 


CO 




f- 


CO 




CJ 


UJ 




UJ 


-J 




J 


z 




uj 


3 




CO 


o 




H 


vO 


i — i 


< 


a> 






i— ( 


T3 


-J 


i 


— 


rJ 


i— i 


p 


< 


to 


C 


u, 


o> 


O 


■3- 


rH 


u 


o 




1 — ' 


2 






co 




a 




Q 


UJ 


Q 


Z 


H 


^ 


< 

X 


O 
Z 


2 


OS 


UJ 


O 


< 


CO 


i — i 


2 


1 — 1 


H 




■s. 


< 


u- 


os 


H 


o 


UJ 


h- 1 




a: 


CL, 


UJ 


H 


1— 1 


H 


O 


cj 


< 




UJ 


H 




OS 


CO 




a, 


UJ 




« 


I 




U-l 


H 




OS 






r> 






F 






< 






a: 






uj 






CL, 






s: 






UJ 






H 






eg 






CO 






< 






OS 






UJ 






> 






< 







rs 



O 

z 



CJ 

< 



UJ 



P 
C 

- 
o 
u 



c 



C 
o 

P 
CjO 
C 











00 




















rH 
















rs 












1—1 


CT) 


LO 




I— 1 


O 










"st 


to 


to 




LO 


CM 






CM 


to 


00 




CM 


rH 










sD 


•st 


LO 




to 


CT) 










O 


vO 


00 




OO 


•—< 






^f 


CT) 


sD 




CM 


CT, 










\D 


■st 


LO 




rf 


rH 










v£> 


ro 


"s* 




•st 


fs. 






sO 


■st 


LO 




■st 












O 


to 


rs 




■sf 

i— I 


fs. 










CM 


CM 


CM 




1— t 


CT) 






sD 


00 


CM 




CM 

to 


sO 










vO 


rs 


vO 






to 










O 


O 


o 






to 






r^ 


CM 


O 




. 


I— 1 










"* 


CN 


to 




to 












"* 


CM 


to 




to 


, — 1 






•st 


to 


■st 




to 












00 


to 


i— i 




o 

LO 


00 










v£> 


LO 


to 




<* 


CM 






CN) 


CTi 


sO 




LO 


E- 










r^ 


sD 


r-s. 




• 












O 


CO 


CT) 




• 


rs. 






i^ 


i—i 


CT) 
















io 


ro 


•st 




to 












LO 


CM 


to 




to 








LO 


** 


^f 




to 












■st 


CM 


oo 




00 
CT) 


rH 










to 


CTi 


sO 




CM 


00 






00 


LO 


CM 




to 

rH 


O 










ct 


^3 


r-s 




• 












■st 


vC 


o 












00 


to 


T—t 




• 












sO 


•st 


LO 




(Nl 












sO 


ro 


LO 




to 








sD 


LO 


sO 




to 












r-~ 


O 


■st 




CM 


o 










CM 


*tf 


oo 




00 
CM 


o 






O 


i — 1 


1 1 




to 

00 


o 










ct 


r- 


CT) 
















"vC 


r- 


o 




• 








oo 


-st 


<—i 




• 












rs 


LO 


\D 




to 












r^ 


^r 


\o 




to 








r~- 


v£5 


r- 




CM 












CM 


to 


00 




CT) 
00 


o 










^T 


\D 


o 




o 

LO 


o 






sO 


i — i 


■st 




CT) 
VO 


o 










LO 


■st 


■st 




• 












CT) 


^f 


t~- 




• 








to 


CT) 


sO 




• 












00 


vC 


r~ 




•st 












r- 


LO 


o 




■si- 








oo 


sO 


r~- 




LO 












CT 


CT> 


■st 




CM 


o 










LO 


LO 


o 




"st 
00 


o 






o 


CT, 


LO 




rs 

LO 


c 










sD 


L0 


\D 




• 












o 


LO 


00 




• 








■st 


00 


sO 
















00 


vo 


rs 




•st 












oo 


LO 


sO 




•si" 








00 


sO 


r^ 




to 












CM 


o 


rH 




sD 


o 










r-~ 


o 


CT, 




00 


o 






CT) 


sD 


to 




to 


c 










• 


• 


• 




i— I 












■ 


• 


• 




sD 








• 




• 




r-i 












to 


1 — 1 


CM 
















t^ 


CM 


^3- 




• 








oo 


to 


T—i 
















oo 


sC 


r- 




to 












r^ 


L0 


\D 




■st 








r^ 


vO 


rs 




to 












"st 


«sr 


CT 




to 

CT) 


o 










to 


to 


CT) 




r~s 


r—{ 






CM 


LO 


•st 




CM 

i — 1 


o 










LO 


CM 


to 
















o 


ro 


vO 




• 








o 


t 


CM 




• 












rs 


LO 


sD 




to 












r^ 


-t 


LO 




■sT 








rs. 


LO 


sO 




to 












00 


o 


CT, 




oo 

CM 


rH 










^ 


C 


CM 




■sl- 
rH 


-st 






rs 


sO 


r- 




to 

CM 


H 










LO 


CM 


to 




• 












o 


"st 


r-> 




• 


"st 






T—\ 


LO 


to 




• 












sD 


■st 


LO 




to 












sO 


to 


■st 




■st 








sO 


"st 


LO 




to 












1 — 1 


^ 


■st 




00 


CM 










•st 


to 


T—< 




LO 
LO 


CT 






o 


sO 


00 




to 

■st 


LO 










"sf 


CM 


to 






<st 










r^ 


<tf 


vO 






LO 






rH 


sD 


ro 






I— I 










LO 


to 


•st 




to 












'-t 


CM 


to 




•sl" 


r—{ 






LO 


to 


•st 




■st 












00 


CM 


O 




to 

CT) 


-st 










"^t 


CM 


00 




sO 
■st 


r-s 






CM 


00 


o 




00 

r—l 


CT 










LO 


\D 


\D 






LO 










o 


CC 


CT) 






to 






r^ 


o 


CT) 






i—i 










«tf 


CM 


to 




CM 












■st 


rH 


CM 




to 


, — i 






"st 


to 


to 




to 












to 


to 


00 




LO 


hs 










o 


■^r 


CM 




00 

to 


CM 






CM 


o 


•—< 




CT 

CT) 


<—< 










■st 


t-s. 


L0 






•st 










CD 


CT) 


CT) 




• 


LO 






■st 


o 


r- 




• 


■st 










^ 


CM 


to 




to 






I ^ 

rH 






to 


rH 


CM 




■st 


r—t 






rr 


to 


to 




CN! 






CM 

sO 


00 

3 


















<* 


















1 ^ 
















00 CT 


< 
















(/> 


CT) 


















X 
















3 


rH 


















t/1 


i — 1 


















p 
















< 




* 
















<u 




















c 


















X'st 
















i— i 





/ ( 
















3 
o 
















i 


03 


sD 
CT) 
















o 


rQ 


X 
















CJ 
















rH 




, — I 
















vO 


E 


p 
































LO 


i 






1 


E 

3 










CTi 
i— 1 


CD 
P 


3 




E 
3 


E 
- 










u 

CD 




E 
3 


E 










CT) 

rH 


rH 


X 

rH 


sO 


E 


£ 




/ — *\ 






l 


Oh 


o 




E 


E 










P 




E 


E 




, — \ 








£ 


3 


sO 


•H 


•rH 




- 






i— I 


CD 


u 




•H 


•H 










W 




•H 


•H 




• 






• 


CT, 


•-5 


CT 


X 


c 




PI 






ro 


CO 






X 


c 










CD 




X 


c 




c 






c 


i — I 




rH 


,—. 03 


■ H 




l — i 




i — i 


CD 




p 


/ — ^ 


03 


•rH 








•—< 


O 


r — ■ 


o3 


•H 




» — < 




rH 


03 




1 




3 


2 


rH 


* — ' 




i — i 
03 


i — i 


1 


p 



PL, 
3 


2 


ST 


X 

1 — 1 






03 


rH 
O 


3 


S 


s 


X 

i — i 


^ — ' 




I — 1 

03 


"-D 


> 


to 


X 


^ X 


XX 


c 


1— 1 


ip 


l 


O 


rH 


* — ' 


X 


XX 


C 


^—< 


<+H 


s 




X 


XX 


c 


^—1 


tp 


1 


O 


sD 


S 


^H 


■— i 


p 


o 


03 


S 




"nT 


U 




rH 


rH 


p 


o 


n3 


2 


*" — * 




, — i 


rH 


p 


o 


03 


2 




X 


CT 




0) -H 


•H 


c 


•H 


P 


o 


T3 


CT) 


03 


CD 


•H 


■ H 


c 


•H 


p 


o 




<D 


•H 


•H 


c 


•H 


P 


O 


T3 




i— I 


i 


?H 03 


rt 


o 


P 


O 


C 


H 


i-H 


CD 


rH 


03 


03 


o 


P 


o 


c 


X 


'h 


03 


03 


o 


P 


O 


c 


H 


*» 






3 Q 


Q 


2 


03 


E- 


CO 


O 




> — ' 


D 


Q 


Q 


"Z. 


03 


H 


CO 


p 


3 


Q 


Q 


2 


r3 


H 


CO 


o 


c 




LO 


P 






P 






u 


X 




+J 








P 






•H 


+H 








P 






u 


sD 


C 


sO 


03 - 


• 


• 


•rH 






cu 


03 


•n 


03 


■ 




. 


•H 


• 


. 


u 


03 




. 


• 


■ H 






o 


CT, 


03 


CT 


P. 00 


M 


00 


& 


00 


00 oi 


2 


c 


H 


oo 


oo 


00 


P- 


00 


00 




rH 


00 


00 


00 


a 


OO 


oo o: 


rH 


•-D 


rH 


CD > 


> 


> 


•H 


> 


> 


^ — * 




03 


CD 


> 


> 


> 


• H 


> 


> 


c 


CD 


> 


> 


> 


•rH 


> 


> 


^ — ' 








CX< 


< 


< 


CJ 


< 


< 






r— 1 


o,< 


< 


<C 


CJ 


< 


< 


03 


Ch< 


< 


< 


u 


< 


< 










6 






o 










r* 


E 















CD 


E 








CD 














CD 






rH 










03 


cu 








'r* 






O 


o 








rH 














E- 






c_ 










O 


H 








Ch 






o 


H 








Cv, 















-65- 



X 






E-< 






i— i 






3: 






CO 






Z 






O 






t— i 






H 






< 






C_> 






o 






J 






Q 






UJ 


CO 




E- 


CO 




u 


UJ 




UJ 


J 




J 


z 




UJ 


X 




CO 


o 




E-H 


vO 




< 


CD 


• 




!— 1 


T3 


J 


1 


— 


►J 


1— | 


4-> 


< 


tO 


C 


u. 


CD 


o 


s 


i— 1 


CJ 


o 




v ' 


Z 






to 


• ■ 


Q 




Q 


UJ 


Q 


Z 


E- 


z 


< 


O 


^ 


-J 


Z 




X 




z 


OS 


UJ 


o 


< 


CO 


r-H 


S 


1—4 


H 




s 


< 


uu 


OS 


E- 


o 


UJ 


i— i 




X 


0- 


UJ 


E- 


i—i 


E- 


O 


U 


< 




UJ 


H 




OS 


CO 




a, 


UJ 




* 


X 




UJ 


H 




OS 






3 






E- 






2 






UJ 






Ou 






S 






UJ 






E- 






UJ 






u 






< 






OS 






UJ 






> 






< 







O 

z 



00 

c 

•H 

C 
Ctl 

-J 

X| 

»H 

Jh 

O 

CL- 
IO 

oo 

c 

•H 
2 

O 









LO 










^* 










to 




cc 


CN 


LO 


r-. 


en 


^o 


CO 


CN 


to 


CN 


i—l 


CC 


LO 


i—i 


■<* 


sO 


vO 


vO 


to 


LO 


r>, 


-t 


\D 


vO 


o 


00 


vO 


r-- 


vO 


r~j 


vO 


^r 


LO 


«t 


i— 1 


vO 


-t 


LO 


Tj" 


1—1 


\D 


^f 


LO 


"* 


^H 


1^- 


a> 


tO 


LO 

o 


o 


r— 1 


o 


\D 


00 
CTi 


CT) 


to 


cr, 


sO 


to 

1— ( 


\D 


r- 


cc 


oo 


• 


to 


cd 


CC 


00 


• 


i— 1 


CD 


cr, 


CT) 


• 


CN 


•*r 


CN 


to 


to 




■* 


CN 


to 


CN 




<tf 


CN 


to 


to 




t^ 


r*- 


CN 


to 

CN 


r-« 


LO 


■** 


LO 


i—l 


to 


CN 


"tf 


to 


1—1 

CN 


to 


00 


r-- 


oo 


• 




cd 


LO 


r^ 


• 




O 


CC 


CT) 


• 




LO 


to 


■* 


to 




LO 


to 


•* 


to 




v£> 


to 


^1- 


to 




Tt 


r- 


MD 


cd 

CN 


E- 


"* 


n- 


CTi 


i—l 

LO 


o 


LO 


o 


to 


o 

LO 


o 


cr, 


t^ 


00 


• 




o 


LT; 


r^ 


• 




o 


cc 


CT) 






vO 


** 


LO 


to 




[■*. 


<* 


LO 


to 




r^ 


^f 


LO 


to 




CN 


sO 


a> 


i— i 


o 


">* 


■<* 


"3" 


CTi 

to 


o 


r^ 


CT) 


oo 


"3- 


o 


CD 


CO 


00 


• 




o 


vO 


00 


• 




o 


co 


CD 


• 




h- 


lo 


<c 


■^ 




00 


LO 


v£> 


*» 




00 


LO 


sD 


** 




o 


i— i 


1—1 


i — i 
to 


o 


CD 


CC 


cr. 


LO 


o 


"5J- 


CC 


i—i 


i-H 
O 


o 


LO 


LO 


LO 


• 




LO 


to 


*3- 


• 




vO 


LT, 


vO 


• 




CC 


v£5 


r^ 


LO 




00 


vO 


r-^ 


LO 




00 


vO 


r^ 


\D 




C 


r- 


a. 


CN 


o 


\0 


to 


LO 


i— ( 
CN 


o 


vO 


o 


CO 


CD 

to 


o 


r^ 


sD 


v£> 


• 




r-- 


LO 


vO 






h- 


r^ 


h> 


• 




X 


vO 


t~» 


■* 




00 


vO 


r^ 


LO 




00 


c 


t~^ 


** 




-3- 


LO 


o 


CN 


o 


o 


LO 


to 


to 


o 


rf 


«sf 


-* 


CD 
<* 


o 


tn 


CN 


to 


- 




-5t 


o 


CN 






^3- 


CN 


to 






cc 


vD 


r-~ 


to 




00 


vO 


r^- 


to 




00 


SO 


t*» 


to 




cr, 


r^ 


oo 


o 

i—i 


o 


LO 


LO 


o 


to 


o 


CTi 


■<* 


CN 


CN 


c 


LO 


to 


<tf 


• 




\d 


i— 1 


-* 


• 




vO 


to 


LO 






r^ 


LO 


vO 


rr 




h* 


LO 


vO 


to 




r^ 


LO 


\C 


to 




>D 


r- 


CN 


oo 
<* 


1— 1 


"tf 


o 


CN 


to 


E-i 


CN 


o 


v£) 


to 


rH 


o 


to 


LO 


. 




vO 


CN 


rt 


• 




r~- 


rt 


LO 


• 




vO 


"* 


LO 


to 




vO 


*tf 


LO 


to 




vD 


■^r 


LO 


to 




to 


CD 


vO 


CD 


to 


r— 1 


o 


i—l 


to 


to 


to 


cc 


vO 


to 

1—1 


r~» 


LO 


to 


«* 


> 


to 


LO 


to 


Tf 




CN 


vO 


'* 


LO 


■ 


CN 


LT, 


to 


^r 


to 




LO 


to 


^ 


«* 




LO 


to 


<* 


^f 




^ 


sD 


vO 


CN 


to 


CD 


c 


LO 


CT) 
CN 


00 


vO 


^H 


"* 


1— 1 
CN 


CN 


f> 


r~- 


r^ 


• 


<* 


00 


cc 


00 


• 


CN 


a. 


cr 


CD 




to 


■^r 


CN 


to 


CN 




^f 


CN 


to 


to 




** 


CN 


to 


to 




i—i 


cr, 


o 


00 


LO 


sO 


CC 


r^ 


i—l 
LO 


CT) 


o 


to 


r-^ 




LO 


v£> 


r-» 


r-. 




<* 


r- 


r^ 


r^ 




CN 


00 


cr, 


oo 




to 


■sfr 


CN 


to 


to 




^r 


r ] 


to 


to 




"* 


CN 


to 


to 





u_ 



X' 



as 
ch 

o 

c 

CO 



i— i i— i +-> O nS 

-H -H C -H 4-> 

Jh aS aJ O +-> O 

3 Q Q S rt H 

+-> +-» 

nj • • . .h 

fn U M M aO0 M 

<U > > > -H > > 

Cl,< < < O < < 

E a> 

<L> U 

H CL, 



X 

c 

o 
u 

<D 

LO 

o 
E 
o 

CO 



X 

+J 

c 
- 
o 

C_J 

o 

o 



X' 






i— I 






aJ 


^^ X 


XX 


c 


^H 


cw 


i — i 


.-I -P 


o 


nS 


2 


0) -H 


•H C 


•H 


4-J 


O 


u a 


rt o 


*J 


o 


c 


3 Q 


Q S 


03 


E- 


co 


■M 




4-> 






n) • 


• • 


•H 


• 


• 


f-i 00 


00 00 


Cm 


cj: 


00 


CD > 


> > 


■rl 


> 


> 


Ph<C 


< < 


O 


< 


< 


S 




CD 






CD 




^ 






H 




C_ 







X 

5-t 













LO 


^ V 












LT, 


CN 












CM 


"* 












i-H 


CD 
i-H 












o 














lO 


• 


E 


E 








cr, 


+-» 


3 


3 








1—1 


Pu 


E 


E 


/ — \ 






1 


<D 


•H 


•H 


• 






1 — 1 


CO 


X 


c 


c 






to 




i — \ rt 


•H 


1 — 1 




^H 


■cr, 


t 


uu S 

3 


S X 

1—1 


v — ' 




1—1 


r— 1 


i-H 


^^ X 


XX 


c 


rH 


(+H 


1 


■^l- 


1—1 


1-1 +-> 


o 


as 


2 




CD 


CD -H 


•H C 


•H 


4-> 


O 


^ 


i—l 


5h CC) 


aS O 


■M 


O 


c 


FH 




3 a 


a s. 


as 


E- 


CO 


O 


• 


4-J 




4J 






U 


00 


rt • 


> 


■H 




• 


a] 


3 


U 00 


00 00 


& 


00 


oo os 


< 


CD > 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


^— ^ 




&<: 


< < 


(J 


< 


< 






E 




u 










CD 




5h 










H 




a. 











-66- 



X 



co 

2 

O 



H 






< 






U 






O 






J 






Q 






uj 


CO 




H 


CO 




U 


UJ 




UJ 


J 




J 


2 




UJ 


=3 




CO 


O 




H 


vO 


• 


< 


Cn 


-3 




r— 1 


— 


-J 


1 


•(-> 


J 


i— 1 


C 


< 


tO 


O 


P- 


en 


u 


s 


i — i 




o 






2 




o 


CO 




UJ 




a 


H 


Q 


2 


O 


^ 


< 


2 




X 


PJ 


2 


OS 


co 


o 


< 


i— i 


1— 1 


2 


2: 


H 




Di 


< 


u~ 


UJ 


fc- 


o 


X 


p— i 




H 


Cl 


UJ 


O 


1— 1 


p 




U 


< 




UJ 


H 




Qi 


CO 




a. 


UJ 




-. 


X 




P4 


H 




Oi 






3 






P 






3 






UJ 






Dh 






2 






UJ 






E- 






uj 






CO 






< 






DC 






UJ 






> 






< 







1^ 



UJ 



+J 

c 
- 
o 

a> 

4-> 
1/5 

'J 
f-l 
O 









r-- 










CM 










t~^ 




r-» 


r^- 


r-. 


i—i 


r^ 


LO 


i— 1 


to 


CM 


vD 


CM 


'-f 


00 


o 


o 


r-~ 


LO 


v£> 


en 


i— ( 


VD 


o 


00 


■3- 


CM 


vO 


to 


<tf 


LO 


LO 


vD 


"5t 


LO 


<* 


i— i 


VO 


L0 


LO 


■* 


i—l 


vO 


■^r 


LO 


^r 


CM 


oo 


00 


to 


i— i 
-3- 


CM 


r^ 


en 


to 


en 


r^ 


to 


o 


r^ 


to 

<* 


■-JD 


en 


oo 


CT> 


• 


CM 


r^ 


CM 


o 


• 


CM 


LO 


ȣ) 


LO 


• 


•** 


-* 


CM 


to 


to 




<tf 


to 


<tf 


CM 




■* 


CM 


to 


to 




oo 


r-~ 


to 


LO 
LO 


CM 


LO 


to 


"* 


to 
to 


LO 


><* 


i— I 


to 


1— 1 


LO 


en 


\0 


oo 






00 


CM 


o 


• 




r^ 


LO 


\£> 






LO 


to 


^r 


to 




LO 


■<* 


LO 


to 




LO 


to 


■«* 


to 




r-^ 


r—i 


en 


1—1 
en 


E- 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1— 1 

r— 1 


o 


00 


-T 


i—l 


en 

"3" 


^H 


o 


r-» 


00 


. 




en 


to 


i— 1 






en 


"* 


r-* 


• 




t^ 


«tf 


LO 


to 




v0 


LO 


\D 


to 




v£> 


--r 


LO 


to 




<* 


CM 


to 


o 

LO 


O 


en 


CM 


r— 1 


en 

LO 


o 


t^ 


to 


LO 




o 


o 


oo 


en 






en 


*tf 


CM 






en 


LO 


r-^ 


• 




co 


LO 


vO 


t 




r-« 


vO 


r^ 


to 




r- 


LO 


^o 


to 




C. 


Cfi 


CM 




o 


r-> 


cr. 


oo 


o 
o 


o 


\D 


CM 


en 


o 

LO 


o 


LO 


*fr 


LO 


• 




LO 


cn 


r^ 






LO 


CM 


to 


• 




CO 


vC 


r-« 


LO 




00 


vO 


[-- 


LO 




00 


vC 


r^ 


«* 




tO 


cn 


vD 


CM 

i— I 


o 


o 


\D 


00 


LO 


o 


r-. 


i — i 


a, 


i — i 


c 


h- 


LO 


^O 






r^~ 


o 


oo 






r^- 


-r 


LO 






00 


'sC 


r-« 


LO 




00 


r-- 


r-> 


LO 




oo 


\o 


f- 


^ 




o 


CN 


\D 


o 
oo 


o 


o 


i— i 


^> 


LO 


o 


vO 


o 


to 




o 


^ 


i— 1 


CM 






to 


vO 


^ 






to 


cr, 


I—l 






00 


O 


r-. 


to 




00 


^D 


I s - 


tO 




00 


LO 


r^ 


to 




o 


CN 


r—i 


1—1 


o 


en 


r—t 


o 




o 


I—l 


CO 


o 


oo 

i—i 


o 


vO 


CM 


«* 






^r 


r-~ 


vO 






v£> 


i— i 


>5t 


• 




r^ 


LO 


^D 


to 




r-- 


LO 


vD 


to 




r^ 


LO 


<o 


>* 




r-< 


O 


^O 


1— 1 


r— 1 


\D 


Tt 


LO 


o 

LO 


1—1 


oo 


CO 


00 


CM 

CO 


to 


vO 


to 


*tf 






** 


vO 


LO 


• 




LO 


I—l 


to 


• 




vO 


-t 


LO 


to 




o 


"* 


LO 


to 




v£5 


^ 


LO 


to 




LO 


CO 


r-~ 


CM 


en 


1—1 


LO 


to 




LO 


to 


CM 


to 


to 

r— I 


CM 


Lfi 


to 


t 




CM 


"sf 


vO 


LO 




CM 


to 


i— 1 


CM 


• 


r- 


m 


to 


«* 


"* 




LO 


to 


<tf 


to 




LO 


to 


^1- 


^1- 




i — i 


to 


r-. 


to 


o 


to 


t^ 


o 


00 


i—l 


CM 


CO 


o 


oo 

en 


^H 


cr. 


CO 


oo 




to 


r-- 


o 


en 


• 


to 


v£5 


LO 


v£> 




h> 


-r 


(NJ 


to 


to 




^j- 


to 


to 


CM 




«!t 


CM 


to 


CM 




cn 


to 


1 — 1 


en 


to 


o 


o 


LO 


LO 
LO 


[^ 


o 


LO 


to 


to 

LO 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


00 


• 


to 


\D 


r— 1 


00 


• 


to 


'tf 


-r 


■^f 


• 


LO 


^-r 


CN 


to 


to 




*tf 


to 


to 


to 




"* 


C J 


to 


to 











































03 


C 








































03 


o 








































"O 


■H 
4-> 












, > 














, ^ 














<D 


03 












X 














X 














f-i 


■M 












4-> 














+-> 














3 


•H 












c 














c 














+-» 


Ph 


E 


p 








3 




6 


E 








3 




E E 










o3 


•H ^~\ 


3 


3 








O 




3 


3 








o 




3 3 










U 


O O 


E 


E 


/— \ 






u 




E 


E 


> — \ 






CJ 




E E 




, N 






o 


0) vD 


•H 


■H 












•H 


■H 












•H -H 




• 






Ph 


f-i en 


^cl 


c 


(3 






4-> 




X 


c 


C 






a> 




X c 




c 






E 


CL,i-H 


•H 


i — i 




i — i 


?H 


/ — s 


nj 


•H 


r—\ 




i—i 


M 


/ — ^ 


o3 -H 




I—l 




r— 1 


CD 


i 


u, s 


S X 


* — ' 




i — i 


o 


LL 


s 


S X 


•■ ' 




r—i 


o 


LL 


s: s: 


X 


"■ — ' 




-—I 


H 


.« i— i 


3 


i— 1 






03 


> 


O 




1— I 






03 


E 







i—i 






rt 




LO tO 


v -^ X 


XX 


c 


^H 


4-i 


i — i 


1 — ' 


X 


XX 


c 


i — i 


<-H 


•H 


1 — ' 


X X X. 


c 


r-^ 


LH 


i 


vo en 


r—i 


l-t +-> 


o 


03 


2 


03 




i — i 


T-\ +-> 


o 


03 


s 


+-> 




1—1 1—1 


•M 


o 


nJ 


2 




en i—i 


CD -H 


■H C 


•H 


■M 


O 


U 


0) 


•H 


•H C 


•H 


+-> 


o 


i—l 


<u 


•H -H 


c 


•H 


4J 


O 


T3 


i—i 


?H 03 


a3 o 


fJ 


O 


C 


v — ' 


u 


03 


03 O 


4^ 


O 


c 


03 


t-\ 


o3 o3 


o 


■l-> 


o 


C 


fn 


i « 


3 a 


Q 2 


rt 


H 


CO 




3 


a 


Q S 


03 


H 


CO 


0Q 


3 


Q Q 


s 


03 


E-i 


CO 


O 


oo o3 


+-> 




4-J 






if) 


+J 






+- 1 






, *— ' 


T-> 






+-> 






CJ 


t +-» 


a3 • 




•H 


• 


• 


c 


OS 






•H 




• 




03 






■H 


• 




<u 


en o3 


U bo 


bo W) 


CL, 


M 


bO 


o 


u 


u> 


bO M 


CL 


CO 


oo 


C 


U 


bO bO 


bO 


Ph 


00 


bo a 


r-l T3 


CJ > 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


E 


0) 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


o 


CD 


> > 


> 


•H 


> 


> 


v — ' 




CL<d 


< < 


o 


< 


< 


o 


CL< 


< < 


o 


< 


< 


to 


CL< < 


< 


o 


< 


< 






E 











1—1 


E 






a> 






s 


E 






0) 










<u 




^ 






o 


cu 






u 






o 


cu 






fl 










H 




CL 






CO 


H 






a, 






E-i 


H 






Cl 











<D 
bO 

03 
P 

bO 
C 
■ H 

O 



o 

C|H 

c 
o 

13 
CD 
3 

C 

•H 
4-> 

c 
o 
o 



•67- 



■x. 






H 






1— 1 






s 






CO 






Z 






O 






h- 1 






E- 






< 






U 






O 






J 






Q 






UJ 


CO 




E-h 


CO 




U 


UJ 




UJ 


J 




hJ 


z 




UJ 


3 




CO 


o 




H 


vO 




< 


CTi 


. 




r-H 


13 


J 


1 


— 


J 


r-H 


4-> 


< 


tO 


C 


p- 


CX> 


o 


2£ 


i-H 


CJ 


o 




' — ' 


2 






CO 




o 




Q 


UJ 


Q 


Z 


E- 


^ 


< 

>■« 


o 
z 


Z 


os 


PJ 


o 


< 


CO 


I— I 


2 


1 — 1 


E- 




•3" 


< 


Pl, 


OS 


E- 


O 


P4 


i — i 




X 


O- 


w 


E- 


i — i 


H 


O 


u 


< 




uj 


H 




DC 


CO 




0- 


PJ 




»v 


"T- 




UJ 


H 




OS 






3 






E- 






3 






uj 






(X 






S 






uj 






E- 






PJ 






u 






< 






Qi 






PJ 






> 






< 










o 
z 



^J 



X 









CN 










v£> 




1—1 


i-H 


vO 


oo 


oo 


<* 


to 


CT> 


r~- 


r-~ 


^r 


to 


to 


>st 


r^ 


LO 


CN 


to 


CN 


o 


vO 


Tf 


LO 


■^r 


CN 


V£3 


■"tf 


LO 


"5t 


r i 


00 


i-H 


"* 


to 


LO 


CN 


r—l 


t-. 


CN 

O 


CN 


CM 


vO 


<tf 




LO 


"*t 


LO 


<3" 




-T 


-T 


CN 


tO 


to 




"* 


CN 


to 


to 




tO 


C 


t^ 


en 

CN 


o 


vO 


to 


LO 


CTi 
O 


CO 


•^t 


LO 


Tt 


• 


i-H 


LO 


to 


■* 


• 




lo 


tO 


^ 


to 




LO 


to 


Tt 


to 




O 


LO 


r^ 


^ 
** 


H 


i-H 


o 


vO 


CN 


1 — I 


t^ 


•*3" 


LO 


• 




oo 


to 


LO 


• 




vO 


** 


LO 


to 




vO 


rf 


LO 


to 




oc 


cn 


LO 


1—1 

r-. 


O 


vO 


^3- 


LO 


CTi 


o 


r^ 


LO 


vD 


• 




oo 


^r 


vD 






r- 


LO 


vO 


to 




r^ 


LO 


vO 


to 




to 


i— 1 


CN 


CTi 


o 


«* 


LO 


LO 


i— I 
CN 


o 


«vf- 


CN 


tO 


• 




LO 


i— 1 


to 


• 




00 


vO 


r^ 


^ 




00 


vO 


[^ 


^t- 




r\i 


00 


cr. 


to 


o 


to 


00 


i-H 


O 
CN 


o 


«C 


to 


*3- 


. 




r~- 


CN 


LO 






CO 


vD 


r-~ 


"* 




00 


vO 


r^ 


<tf 




CM 


CN 


r-~ 


to 

1 — 1 


o 


LO 


LO 


o 


O 

oo 


o 


CM 


CT> 


o 


• 




to 


CO 


i — i 






co 


LO 


r-. 


^ 




CO 


L0 


h- 


to 




^ 


vO 


LO 


LO 


o 


i-H 


o 


i — i 


O 


o 


*vf 


C 


CM 


. 




vC 


c 


to 


. 




r^ 


LO 


^O 


to 




r-. 


L0 


vO 


"* 




c 


vO 


to 


r-H 


to 


LO 


o 


oo 


to 

LO 


1 — 1 


t 


C 


CN 


• 




LO 


c 


CN 


• 




vO 


"vT 


LO 


to 




vO 


"3- 


LO 


to 




vO 


O 


to 


LO 

o 


oo 


CN 


\D 


a-. 


CN 

vO 


to 


i — 1 


i— I 


i-H 


• 


r-. 


to 


o 


7—t 




LO 


LO 


to 


^l" 


^r 




LO 


to 


^f 


to 




— i 


r^ 


at 


CN 

00 


oo 


LO 


o 


to 


1^. 


•vT 


to 


<tf 


to 




vO 


^r 


■"3- 


■=3" 


• 


LO 


-f 


CN 


to 


CN 




rr 


CN 


to 


CN 




LO 


r-- 


- 


to 


<* 


o 


LO 


00 


CN 

CN 


cc 


rH 


-T 


to 




vo 


to 


T 


to 


. 


■*d- 


^ 


C 1 


to 


to 




^ 


CN 


to 


to 







E 


E 










3 


3 










E 


E 


» — \ 








•H 


•H 










X 


c 


c 






r — \ 


aj 


•H 


r-H 




i — i 


LL, 



S 


i — i 


* ' 




r-H 
CtS 


v — ' 


X 


XX 


c 


1 — 1 


<4- 




r-H 


r-H 4_) 


o 


cd 


2 


0) 


•H 


•H C 


•H 


+J 


o 


u 


03 


n5 O 


4J 


o 


c 


■z 


a 


a S 


Cfl 


H 


CO 


«J 






■(-> 






rt 






•H 


. 




u 


GO 


DO DO 


cx 


M 


M 


CD 


> 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


CX< 


<c < 


o 


< 


< 


e 






o 






o 






fH 






— 






Oh 







X 

■(-> 
c 

o 
u 

<D 

?H 
O 



CJ 

o 
■p 

X) 

o 

c 



E E 

3 3 



(jl, S S X' 



o 


r-H 






aS 


*— ' X 


XX 


C 


i— I 


Mh 


. — i 


i-H +-> 


o 


a3 


3 


CD -H 


•H C 


•H 


+J 


O 


rH 03 


rt o 


4^ 


o 


c 


3 Q 


Q «S 


a} 


H 


CO 


4-J 




+J 






rt • 


. 


•H 




• 


rH DO 


DC DO 


Cin 


bi 


DO 


CD > 


> > 


•H 


> 


> 


Oh< 


< < 


O 


< 


< 


E 











CD 




5h 






H 




Ol, 







c 
o 

•H 

+-> 
as 

rH 

+-) 

t/> 

■H 
C 
•H 

E 
-a 
< 



o 

•H 

> 
rH 

CD 
CO 

CD 
O 

c 


■H 

u 

CO 



c 

CD 

E 
C 
O 

rH 

■H 
> 

c 
PJ 



DO 
O 
i— I 

o 

•M 
as 

E 



U 

<D 
+-> 

aS 
•M 
CO 



3 
as 

CD 

rH 

3 
oo 

rH 
CD 
rC 

■M 

as 








CD 




as 




rH 





H 


CJ 




rH 


II 


3 




O 


H 


CO 



-68- 



NATURAL RESOURCES 

Maryland's 2,885,000 commercial forest land area represents 46 per cent 
of the total land area of the State. There is considerable variance as between 
the counties, varying from approximately 30 per cent in Carroll and Talbot 
Counties to approximately 70 per cent in Allegany and Garrett Counties. The 
vast majority of commercial forest land is held in private hands (approximately 
93.5 per cent) while the remaining 6.5 per cent is held publicly. 

Nearly 80 per cent of the timber in Maryland is of the hardwood varieties, 
and some 234 million board feet were cut in fiscal 1967. Forest fires are always 
a threat, and in fiscal 1967, 631 forest fires burned a total area of 1,358 acres 
This figure represents a reduction from 662 fires and 4,905 acres burned in 
fiscal 1966. The 1967 figure equals 46 thousandths of one per cent of the 
forest lands in Maryland, and also is less than one half the average of the 20 
states within the northeastern area. However, the average annual fire occurrence 
for the past five years has doubled the average for the preceding 15 years. 

Nearly $72 million worth of mineral products were extracted in 1968. 
The leading commodity continued to be stone, which accounted for 37 per cent 
of the total value of the State's mineral production, while sand and gravel 
made up 24 per cent of the total value. All of the political subdivisions 
except Baltimore City and the Counties of Queen Anne's and Somerset shared in 
mineral production, with more than half of the State total being produced in 
Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Prince George's, and Washington Counties. 

Seafood is a very important resource, as might be expected, with the 
State's location touching both the Atlantic Ocean and the Chesapeake Bay. In 
reality, the reported data understates substantially the actual data because 
of the great number of sport fishermen in the State. Data supplied by the 



-69- 



U. S. Department of the Interior indicate a Maryland catch in 1968 of nearly 
$16 million. The major share of this catch lies in shellfish with a value 
in excess of $14 million. These shellfish values are led by oysters ( near ly 
$10 million), clams (nearly $2.7 million), and crabs (more than $1.5 million) 
The leading finfish catches by value are striped bass ($920,531), and white 
perch ($242,178). 



-70- 



JO. 48 



COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND AREA BY STAND-SIZE CLASS 
IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1963 



JTAND-SIZE CLASS 



UNITED STATES MARYLAND PENNSYLVANIA DELAWARE VIRGINIA W. VIRGINIA 



'otal 1,000 Acres 508,845 

Per cent of U.S. Total 100.00 

lawtimber 208,945 
1,000 Acres 

'ole timber 164,794 
1,000 Acres 

eedling & Sapling 99,573 
1,000 Acres 

ot Stocked 35,533 



.56 



1,416 



896 



451 



134 



5,089 


391 


15,829 


11,389 


2.95 


.07 


3.10 


2.23 


4,033 


211 


7,184 


5,605 


7,451 


129 


6,623 


3,105 


3,416 


45 


1,744 


2,445 



489 



278 



234 



ource: U. S. Forest Service "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 3, p. 143. 



1 



3 



0. 49 



FOREST LAND AREA IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1963 



TPE 



UNITED STATES MARYLAND 8, D.C. 
1000 Acres 1000 Acres 



PENNSYLVANIA 
1000 Acres 



DELAWARE VIRGINIA W. VIRGIN! 1 * 
1000 Acres 1000 Acres 1000 Acre 



otal Land Area 2,271,343 



6,358 



orest Land 






Area 


758 


865 


% of total land 




.33 


ommercial Forest 






Land 


508 


,845 


% of all forest 






land 




.67 


on-Commercial 






Forest Land 


250 


,020 


% of all forest 






land 




.32 


eserved forest 






land 


16 


,008 



2 


,920 




.43 


2 


,897 




.99 




23 




.78 




20 



28,805 

15,186 

.52 

15,089 
.99 

97 
.63 

97 



1,266 



25,496 



15,411 



392 


16,492 


11,469 


.30 


.64 


.74 


391 


15,829 


11,389 


.99 


.96 


.99 


1 


663 


80 


.39 


1.63 


.69 


1 


259 


46 



ource: U. S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 1, p. 140. 



-71- 



co 
o 

3 

o 

cd 



c 
co 



o 
cd 

t/) 



en 

CD 
4 
< 

H- 
O 
CD 



H 

I- 
CD 
H 

i-J 
CD 

Cl 



r+ 

3* 
CD 

C 
3 

H- 
r+ 
CD 
Cl 

on 

rt 
P 
r+ 
CD 
V> 



T3 



3" 
CD 



T3 > t— i 
CD O - 
4 i-S O 
CD O 

n w o 

CD 

3 
rt 



Id 

to * 
00 CM 

CM 

CM K) 



On <• 
ON CJ\ 

-J 

00 cm 



00 





On v 




On *> 


T1 


• CM 


CD 


On 00 


O" 




H 




C 




P 




4 




"< 




i— i 




lO 




ON 




On 




* 


I— 1 




On 


> 


• Ov 


►3 


-J \l 


*3 




CD 




3 




CL 




H" 




X 




v» 






K) 


H 


\— . v. 


P 


ON ON 


o* 


I— 1 


i— • 


Ji. <0 


CD 




K) 





o 

o 

CL 

c 
(/) 

H- 
3 



3 

& 
(/> 
rt 
4 

H- 
CD 



-0 > I— 
CD O *• 
4 4 O 
CD 

n w 

CD 
3 
rt 



T1 
P 



-a > t— 

CD O >• 



o 
o 



4 4 

CD 

n w 

CD 

3 



O 

o 
o 



o\ 

On 
(— ' >• 
K) On 
• K) 
0\ 00 



on 



00 o 



ON \l 



• On 
O -J 



CM 

K) tO 

• on 

•£> CM 



• 4^ 
tO K) 



O to 
• O 

h- ' to 



INJ 



O ON 
• CM 
NJ O 



• tO 



o 

ON - 
-fc> I- 1 
• ON 

O CM 



"a 

< 
P 
r+ 
CD 



TD > »— 
CD O <• 



4 4 
CD 

n c/> 

CD 

3 



O 
O 

o 



cm 

ON 
ON 
ON V. 

to to 
• \l 



to * 

l— 1 On 
• 00 
K) CM 



•vj v. 

• 00 
00 <£> 



tO 

On cm 

• 00 

on k> 



4*> 

O V. 

o -&>. 

I— ' 
-J K) 



^J 




K) 


O 


ON *• 




K) » 


vo - 


t-" o 


-&>• On 


4S». 00 


O CM 


• o 


• CM 


K) 


• On 


tO K) 


On O 


On »— i 


O CM 



o 
o 

3 
3 
r+ 

an 



o 

>3 
P 



r+ 
P 
r+ 
CD 



n 

CD 
Cl 
CD 



O 

3 

CD 

w 

3* 



■a > >— 

CD O >• 



4 H 
CD 

n en 

CD 

3 



O 
O 

o 



-a > 

CD O 
CD 

n w 

CD 

3 



T3 > l— ' 

CD O <• 

4 4 O 

CD O 

n w o 

CD 

3 



> (-• 
o «• 
4 o 

CD O 
CO O 



t- 1 00 
• 4^ 
4i>. oo 



N) 


t— • 


O 


CM 


V 


N>« 


CM 00 


»— • I—" 


• 4^ 


^J 


VO 4^ 


On on 



On 

o 

00 

00 
4i» 
On 



CM 



4^ i— 
• K) 
CM 00 



• On 

00 4^. 



00 

to 



• On 

O ON 



^J On 
• On 
On to 



CM 4^ 
• 00 
M on 



O 
00 

to 



O 00 



CM 

to 



• on 
CM K) 



• 00 

On oo 



00 K> 
O -J 



00 

to 



to 



I— 1 


-j 00 


CM 


4^ 


• 00 


00 


4^ 


ON CM 


to 



H 
>< 

m 
o 

T1 



m 

"73 

cn 

"X, 
I— I 

"a 



c 



H 

tn 
a 

CO 

H 
> 
H 

tn 

CO 



> 

SO 

-< 
r- 1 



tn 

Z 

CO 

*< 

< 



a 
tn 

tr- 1 

> 
?o 
tn 



po 



tn 
co 



JO 

era 

i—i 
z 

> 



-72- 





Q 






2 






< 




Q 


CO 

PJ 

E- 




H 


CO 


/ — \ 


CO 




l-H 


PJ 


u 


> — ' 


os 


2 


CM 


o 


1— 1 


vD 


u. 


OS 


a> 




o 


l-H 


hJ 


CO 




< 


X 


a 


1— 1 


u 


2 


u 


1— 1 


< 


OS 


PJ 




PJ 


2 


to 


^ 


a 


CD 


o 
u 


<! 


i-H 


2 


Q 


.. 


o 


§> 


CO 

PJ 


OS 


J 


H 


pj 


>• 


< 


03 


OS 


H 


^ 


< 


CO 


r-H 


S 




^ 


2 


Q 
PJ 


< 


i— i 


H 


CO 




l-H 




X 


2 


Q 


O 


X 
-J 




OS 


< 


^ 


u 


H 


U 




2 


o 


_1 


PJ 


H 


< 


2 


CO 


X 


i— i 


CJ 




2 


2 


< 


O 


i— i 




u 


3 


H 




o 


PJ 


PJ 


OS 


2 


X 


U 


Q 


E- 


PL, 


2 




o 


< 




PJ 


D-. 




2 


1 — 1 




3 


X 




— 1 


co 




o 


OS 




> 


P4 
2 




H 


3: 




PJ 


O 




2 


03 





LO 



O 

2 



< 

1 — 1 


















2 


to 00 


r- 


\D 


00 *£> CD O 0O CM 


o to 


LO 


LO 


i— 1 \D CM t^ o r-« 


1 — 1 


^r oo 


\o 


t^ 


00 NMN H O 


i-H LO 


<tf 


vO 


^ M (Nl vD N CTi 


o 


00 • 


LO 


CM 


CM ^f O LO LO 


o • 


to 


vO 


(Jl i-H tO to CM 


Qti 


•> t— i 




* 


•\ ** 


•> i-H 




•» 


»\ »\ #N *v •> 


l-H 


i-H 




i—l 


<-* o 


f-. 




U3 


N H VO H i-H 


> 


i-H 




i—l 


i-H 








CM 



< 








1 — 1 


to r- 


o 


to 


2 


CTi i— • 


LO 


^t 


l-H 


vO • 


to 


to 


CO 


•> CM 


* 


•> 


os 


to 


■"3- 


CTl 



> 



2 

< 


cd r-~ 


LO 


> 


CM tO 


LO 


_J 


CD • 


CD 


> 


* (-M 




CO 


<tf 




2 


i-H 




2 






tu 






Dm 







2 


LO oo to 


CM 


O LO CD CM t^ 


O CD. tO 


< 


CD LO to 


v£> 


1 00 i-H (Nl CM O 


<* "* O 


-J 


vO • 00 


00 


1 !N ■* H i-H 


CM • LO 


>H 


»v 


*\ 


* 


* 


as 


to 


CM 


to 


CM 


< 











in co oo n 

tO O to CD 
LO • CM CM 



O 0O LO LO vO CD 

•xf t~- r- i— i to r- 

CD tO tO vO CM tO 
CM 



^t 00 \D CM 
(N r-H i-H 
LO 



LO vO ^O CD 
vD N Oi vO 
O • vO tO 



CM i-H r-~ LO CM to 

LO i— I "* CD 00 rH 



00 



CM LO 



CM 



tO 

to 



CM O LO \£> 
tO • i-H i-H 



LO O CM CM O 
i— I "<rj- LO CM tO 
CM 



\D CM i-H h- LO CM 

OO CD LO "3- CM CM 

LO f~ LO LO LO 

CM ■—• 



tO tO vO l^- 

O LO rt LO 

O • vO to 

* i-H * 



tO <3" LO ^t "* o 

lo cd oo lo r~^ oo 

O i-H "3" (Nl i—i 

»v *v *\ #\ «\ 

i-H LO i-H i— I i-H 



CD tO vO LO i-H 

i lo to r^ \c i-H 
I \D i-H to to 

#\ 
00 



CM 


O 


rj 


o 


^f 


v£> 


CM 


LO 


r~- 


00 


to 


o 


CO 


LO 


co 


o 


CO 


o 


00 


O 


CD 


vO 


CM 


to 


00 


o 


CO 


cd 


oo 


• 


o 


00 


CM 


LO 


o 


CM 


O 


CM 


i-H 


• 


i-H 


CD 


•* 


o 


























r^ 


o 


"tf 


to 


-* 


CM 


r-i 


vO 


CD 


1^ 


vO 


o 


LO 


o 


cj 


1 — 1 


to 


CD 


to 


\£> 


to 


i— t 






LO 


i-H 


LO 


o 


\D 




■^1- 


i-H 


CM 




to 








<tf 




to 


r-H 



00 CM CD tO LO 00 

O 00 O LO \D oo 
i— I r- 1 LO 00 00 CD 



LO vO LO ^t 00 CD 
LO \D O LO tO i— I 
r-H CM i-H 



PL, 



3 
U 

c 
o 



T3 
03 

o 



+-> 










o 












4-> 










O 










o 










4-> 












o 










+-> 










H 























H 










<D 










CO 










X 




2 








CO 










X 




2 






■ 










•M 




o 








• 










+-> 




O 






X 










3 












X 










3 




5h 






^ <4H 










o 






10 


(/) 




U-i 










O 






t/l 


L0 


o o 










CJ 




i-H 


T3 


T3 




o 










CJ 




i-H 


-a 


-a 


O 


1/1 


10 


Pn 


i-H 




cu 


rt 


O 


O 






tfl 


10 


a, 


^H 




(D 


03 


o 


o 


•M +-> 


-a 


T3 


•H 


03 


•> 


*J 


3 


o 


o 




4-> 


X! 


T3 


•H 


03 


•> 


+-> 


3 


o 


o 


CO c 


o 


O 


-C 


h 


(U 


03 


C 


2 


2 


h 


c 


O 


O 


X 


u 


OJ 


03 


C 


2 


2 


a) 


o 


O 


'/I 


<h 


+-> 


> 


^ 


+J 


T3 


a> 


CD 


O 


O 


to 


CD 


+J 


> 


^ 


4-> 


XI 


W5CJ 


2 


2 


^H 


-XJ 


rt 


•H 


Mh 


U 


X3 


U 


2 


2 


^H 


13 


03 


■H 


cn 


(H 


c 


4J 


-3) 





d) 


4-> 


h 




O 


a3 


^ 




■M 


X! 


CD 


Oj 


+-> 


fH 




O 


03 


•H U 


4h 


U 


c 


CL, 


co 


c 


■M 


CO 


X 


•H 


^ 


4H 


*H 


C 


LL. 


co 


O- 


4-> 


LO 


X 


S <D 


o 


a 


2 








Q> 






■M 


0) 


O 


03 


2 








CD 






O CL, 


CO 


— 


o 








2 






2 


o- 


LO 


X 


O 








2 






(h 




















03 






















O 




















CO 

























co 






CD 






r-H 






^ 






OS 






E-h 






*\ 






X 






•H 






Xt 






c 






CD 






a, 






Ph 






< 






•V 






LO 






vO 






CD 






^H 






X 






u 






03 






3 






^ 




• 


X3 




CM 







vO 


PU 




CD 






i-H 






CD 


»\ 




u 


W 




o3 







^ 


CCS 




CD 


4-> 




£> 


co 




B 






•H 


T3 




•M 







2 


+-> 




03 


•H 




L0 


X 




T3 






c 







o3 


x 
+J 




M 






O 


c 




o 


• H 




+-» 




• 


co 


W 


X 




T3 


r— 1 


00 


c 





C 





> 


•H 


h 


•H 


2 


E- 


4-> 


O 




o 


h 


h 





W) 





p. 




X3 


co 


MH 


B 





o 


•H 

E- 


u 


rC 


C 


LO 


+-> 




LO 


2 


•« 


^H 


O 







^ 


o 


Xl 


W) 


•H 


C 




> 


oS 


r-H 


^ 




03 





•^f 


3 


CO 


LO 


C 




r-H 


c 


+-> 




03 


co 


• 







Ph 


+J 


U 


P^ 





o 




C 


cu 


r-H 


Sh 


• 


r-H 


O 


CO 




MH 


. 


13 


w 


X 


03 


CD 






U 






& 







•H 


o 




PU 
H 


3 

o 
co 





■73- 



NO. 52 



NET VOLUME OF LIVE SAWTIMBER IN SAWTIMBER STANDS 
ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND IN MARYLAND AND NEIGHBORING STATES 
AND THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: 1963 



STAND-SIZE CLASS UNITED STATES MARYLAND PENNSYLVANIA DELAWARE VIRGINIA W. VIRGINIA 



= 



Sawtimber Million 


2,536,799 


8,792 


27,732 


1,255 


37,120 


30,399 


Bd. Ft. 
















Per Cent 


of U.S. 














Total 




100.00 


.34 


1.08 


.04 


1.44 


1.18 


Softwood 




2,058,022 


1,669 


2,351 


546 


12,701 


1,565 


Per Cent 


of U.S. 














Total 




100.00 


.08 


.11 


.02 


.60 


.07 


Hardwood 




478,777 


7,123 


25,381 


709 


24,419 


28,834 


Per Cent 


of U.S. 














Total 




100.00 


1.4 


5.2 


.14 


5.0 


5.9 



Source: U. S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Table 11, p. 155. 



NO. 53 NET VOLUME OF LIVE SAWTIMBER AND GROWING STOCK ON COMMERCIAL FOREST LANDS 

IN MARYLAND, BY SPECIES GROUP: JANUARY 1, 1963 





SPECIES 




LIVE SAWTIMBER 


GROWING STOCK 






(MILLION BD. 


FT.) 


(MILLION CU. FT.) 




Eastern Softwoods, Total 


1,669 




Eastern Softwoods, Total 


833 


White & Red Pine 




32 




Shortleaf $ Loblolly Pine 


480 


Short leaf § Loblolly 


Pine 


1,114 




Other Yellow Pines 


293 


Other 




523 




Other Softwoods 


60 


Eastern Hardwoods, Total 


7,123 




Eastern Hardwoods, Total 


- 2,862 


White Oak 




1,034 




Oak 


- 1,299 


Red Oak 




910 




Beech, Yellow Birch $ 


148 


Other Oaks 




1,377 




Hard Maple 




Soft Maple § Beech 




646 




Hickory 


137 


Sweet Gum 




817 




Sweetgum 


321 


Tupelo § Black gum 




228 




Tupelo § Blackgum 


91 


Hickory 




314 




Yellow Poplar 


381 


Yellow Poplar 




1,338 




Other 


485 


Other 




457 









Source: U. S. Forest Service, "Timber Trends in the United States," February 1965, 
Appendix, Tables 12 and 14, pp. 159 and 161 respectively. 



•74- 



NO. 54 ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF GROWING STOCK ON 

COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND, MARYLAND, BY SPECIES GROUP: 1963 







ANNUAL CUT 


NET GROWTH 




CUBIC FEET 


CUBIC FEET 


SPECIES GROUP 


(1,000) 


(1,000) 



All Species 73,826 93,662 

Softwoods 28,100 20,390 

Hardwoods 45,726 73,272 



Source: U. S. Forest Service, Resource Bulletin NE-7, The Timber Resources of 
Maryland, 1967, Appendix Table 21, p. 54. 



NO. 55 ANNUAL CUT AND NET ANNUAL GROWTH OF LIVE SAWTIMBER ON 
COMMERCIAL FOREST LAND, MARYLAND, BY SPECIES GROUP: 1963 







ANNUAL CUT 


NET GROWTH 




BOARD FEET 


BOARD FEET 


SPECIES GROUP 


(1,000) 


(1,000) 



All Species 233,664 269,125 

Softwoods 96,858 59,125 

Hardwoods 136,806 210,000 

Source: U. S. Forest Service, Resources Bulletin NE-7, The Timber Resources of 
Maryland, 1967, Appendix, Table 21, p. 54. 



-75- 



o 

P 



3 
O 

o 

3 
XS 



H 
O 



n 
o 
4 

Cl 
CO 

P 

CD 

co 

3* 
o 

3 



3" 



h- o 



On 



o 



3 
i-h 
O 
4 

3 
P 



O 

3 

co 

C 
XS 
XS 



Cu 

cr 
o 

CD 

4 
P 
c+ 
O 

CO 



Cl 
O 
fD 
co 

3 
O 



3 
on o 

fD Q 



Xl 

4 

o 

Cl 
C 
o 



o 

H) 



P 

3 
Cl 
O 



3 
OP 



3" 



3 

cr 

ft) 
4 

Hi 

o 
4 

3" 
O 



cn a 

C+ H- 

CD CO 

CD 4 



0) S 

O Cl 

xs n> 

fD 

4 O 

p XS 

r+ n> 

O 4 

4 03 

(/) r+ 

O 

4 

co 



O i— 
O on 
O on 



On On 
ro 4^ 



o 
o 

o 



o 
o 



i-" o 

o o 
o o 



o 
o 



o 

4 

o 
a> 
t/i 
rt 

fD 
4 



H- 03 

O CO 

O 3" 

3 h- 

H- 3 

o era 

O rt 
O 

3 



O 



p 



H on on /O -a 

C 4 
fD H- 
fD 3 
3 O 
fD 
> 

3 n 

3 fD 

fD O 

- 4 

CO tTQ 

fD 



W 



2 t; xin 

O fD O 03 03 

S 4 4 

P Hj 4 

4 O fD 

an rt 

Cl r+ 






fD 

4 



-n o n n n 

fD 4 03 O 4 

Cl O 4 H- 4 

fD 3" i— ' l— ' O 

4 fD fD •— ■ 

H- CO CO I— l 

O rt 

"7? fD 

4 



n n 03 > > 

P 03 03 3 



3 t— 
r+ fD fD 

3 > P 
O 4 3 

4 C X 
fD 3 

CL 
fD 



4^1— ' On N3 OJ W K) W H O Oil (— ' tO On 00 t^ A tn O ^ \1 03 -J O 







1— 1 


04 












1— " 








i— 1 




h- 1 


4^» 














1— ' 


1— ' 


00 


o 




OJ 


-J 




OJ 


O 


NJ 




ON 


K) 


t— > 


O 


OJ 


On 


K> 


On 


00 


4*> 


-t^ t 


on 


o 


-J 


ro 


4> 


I— 1 


OJ 


On 


CT 


OJ 


to 


.£> 


00 


-J 


i— ' 


I— 1 


G- 


On 


ON 


00 


C 


NJ 


-J c 


ON 


OJ 


xj 


on 


00 


*». 


on 


4i> 


»J 


t— 1 


o 


O 


On 


on 


00 


ro 


-ps. 


K) 


K) 


00 


o 


^J 


sj - 


o 


to 


I—" 


CO 


00 


--J 


OJ 


K) 


CT 


oj 


On 


On 


O-J 


J^ 


-J 


OJ 


~-J 


i — i 


4^ 


o 


NJ 


-fc> 


\1 t 



OJ w o 
O -J o 

Ji ICO 



On 
OJ I— ' 



On 4^ O h-> on 
tO K) O On On 
i— ' On O K) 00 



O 1 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


-fc. 


tc 


o 


o 


t— ' 


tNj 



K> I— ' 
00 ON 

O ro 



On OJ 
00 00 

o oo 



o 
o 



-£> 00 
ON \i On 
O OJ On 



M xj CTN W O 
O l— 1 On ON I— ' 
h- i ON O On 4^ 



K) On on i— ' 

W -si M K) 4^ 
On o-j On to On 



O to ^J 4^ On 
O xl l£! 4^ xl 
O }—• t— > i— ' On 



4^. 00 
•s) N) W W 00 
00 •— ' ON K) O 



O On 

o o 
o o 



OJ K) 



o o 
o o 
o o 



O (NJ 

O sj 

O NJ 



o 
o 

o 



o o o 
o o o 
o o o 



O On sj o O 
O I— ' On 4s. O 
O K3 I— ' sj O 



O On i— i 00 O 
O O 4^ O O 
O O sj OJ O 



OJ 


OJ On 


ON 




ON 


oo to 


ON 


xj 


on 


On sj 


OJ 


On 




V* \* 


\m 


*• 


OJ 


OJ On I 


On i 


I O 


ON 


O ON 


•sj 


o 


-!>. 


NJ 4^ 


-f^ 


o 



on 


1—" 


00 


4^ 


NJ 


1— 1 


^J -J 


On 


On 


On sj 


OJ NJ -Pi. 


o 


u 


\# v 


W V >* 


l« 


O 


o o 


i m 4^ tn i 


o 


o 


O On 


O O 00 


o 


o 


O O 


HOC 


o 



to 

On h- ' 

OJ tNj 

CO M vj 



OJ 
K) 



O 



on i— ' 
O H 
O On 



OJ l 



00 
on 
On 



-J OJ 

i— " On t— ■ 

M M O 

On K) to 



to 

on 

i 


104 26,000 
830 


to 

on 
i 



OJ 


1— ' 


1 ON 


OJ 


o 


o 


ON On 


On 


OJ 


tsj 






to 






la 






I o 


I 


1 1 


o 






o 







O 



O O I 

o o 
o o 



K) 

HtOxl KJ \1 

K3 •— ' I— ' 1— ' 4i. 

On On sj on O 

H Ji C/l O 4i 



H si CN W 
W t/l.sl O 
On t— ■ O O 



On l 

O 

O 



OJ 

On 
00 
ON 



00 

o 
o 



o 
o 



INJ -fc. 

NJ O 

o o 



o 

o 



4^ 
O 
O 



o 
o 



OJ o 

ON 00 K) OJ 

O 00 on O 

o to o o 



H 

o 

(-+ 
p 

I— 1 
co 



ON 

On 



to 

OJ 

to 

On 

ON 

4^ 
O 



00 

ON 
ON 

On 

tsj 
00 
OJ 



t-O 



OJ 
OJ 

to 



On 



K3 



On 

to 
00 



On 

t— ' 

to 



^4 

4^ 

O 
O 



OJ 

On 
00 
ON 



4^ 

O 
On 

to 



> 



GO t— 

a c 

"n tn 

H 70 



03 < 

o m 
• z 

tn 

Ti m 

H 70 



CO 


XI 


a 


1 — 1 


• 


r^ 




l—l 


T1 


7". 


H 


C75 


n 


CO 


o 


H 


so 


> 


C3 


< 


C/N 


m 




oo 



T3 

C 



o 
o 
o 

c 
tn 



o 
o 
— 



T3 O T) 

O 70 CD 

c m ?o 

a z oo 

CO CO H 



2X2 
C O i-h 
2 CO Z 

co h m 
m co 

70 



Z tj m 

com 
2 co z 
oo h n 
m co m 

53 



■76- 



NO. 57 



NUMBER OF FOREST FIRES AND AREA BURNED IN MARYLAND, BY 
POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: FISCAL YEARS 1967 AND 1960 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER OF 
FIRES 

1967 W 



AREA BURNED 

1967« 

(ACRES) 



NUMBER OF 
FIRES 

I960 1 J 



AREA BURNED 

1960 ( ' 2 - ) 
(ACRES) 



Mary 1 and 



631 



1,358 



360 



1,774 



Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Caroline 



35 

17 

69 

6 

13 



195 
73 
71 
18 
23 



19 

24 

50 

1 

12 



240 
412 
218 

1 
76 



Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 



20 

22 
18 
38 
32 



28 
80 
56 
113 
42 



12 
30 
4 
15 
28 



35 

107 

14 

34 

37 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Prince George's 



21 
69 
13 
4 
32 



93 
69 
61 

4 
102 



23 
11 
15 
5 
14 



17 
16 
72 



1< 



Queen Anne's 
Montgomery 
Somerset 
St. Mary's 
Talbot 



14 
16 
45 
2 
10 



41 
37 
92 
11 
21 



6 

5 

28 

11 

4 



22 
33 
31 
34 
26 



Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



20 

82 
33 



34 
61 
34 



12 
20 
11 



147 

18 

8 



(1) 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1967. 



(2) 

Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1960. 

Source: Maryland Board of Natural Resources, "Annual Report," 1967 



77- 



co 

UJ CC 
U < 





CO 


1 


OS 


X 


UJ 


r V; 


2 


X 


s 


C^ 


X 



CO CO 



U 



CO 



OJ 



o 



CO >. 

uq t n 



O 

z 



l-H 2 Ol 

CU I— I i— I 



< 



2 

O 
i—i 
CO 



CO 



I— I > HH > 

E — i i— t E — ■ ' — i 






cr> vO ct> ■— ' 



tO CTi CM .—I Tf 



i— I \D LO 
CM 



>— i \o i- m h in n 



M H 1/1 

tO 



to 



to 



O .-I 
On) 



7f O (O (N M i— I to i— I •—• 



i-t r- 



\o 



(N Tt 00 



lo to c\i r^- -— i oo t^ to to to to to m <- 1 



to 



to O) N 



00 



(N 00 1^ to tO ^T M OO O 00 CTiLOtO 



H N H O "t hUl O 






(N ■— I to 



(Nl H IO lO (N 



(N C-J r-H 



\0 

to 



to 



00 (N 



I— 1 


IO I s - O^ vO to 


O (N 00 00 (N 


i— 1 CTi to rfr vO 


(M <* (M IO O 


o c^ to 


to 


to H \Q I— t 


N (N H to to 


rsi ^ i— i i— i 


tO H ^l - <— 1 


<M 00 to 



c 

i-H 



c 

C !h 

rt < 
DO 

CD <D 

< <c 







> o 

^ u 

o3 o3 

U CJ 



o 



uu u 



o 

•H 
fH 

<D 

U, 



<D 

6 
o 

M 

C 

o 






O 

<u 
o 

c 

•H 



c 
< 



cyco 



c 
o 

■M 
DO 

c 

•H 

(0 

03 



0> 





4-> 




*H 




o 




a 




<D 




Di 




i— i 




CTJ 




3 




c 




c 




< 




„ 




c/) 




<u 




o 




u 




3 




o 




10 




<u 


. 


cc 


r>. 




vO 


I— 1 


o> 


03 


i— i 


!h 




3 


*» 


+-> 


o 


oJ 


to 


Z 


0) 


M-l 


C 


O 


3 




^ 


TJ 




^ 


DO 


o3 


B 


O 


•H 

1-t 


CQ 


c 


T3 


PJ 


C 




ol 


h 


i— < 


03 


X 


<D 


h 


>< 


03 




2 


r-H 




OS 




O 


• • 


I/) 


<D 


•H 


o 


PL, 


h 




3 


H 


o 




co 



•78- 



NO. 59 NUMBER OF COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN AND GEAR IN MARYLAND: 

1966, 1960, 1955, 1950 

ITEM 1966 1960 1955 1950 

Total Fishermen 9,021 9,096 10,101 8,606 

Vessels - Motor 

Vessels - Sail 

Boats 

Haul Seines 

Anchor Gill Set 

Drift Gill Set 
Stake Gill Set 
Hand Lines 
Crab Trot Lines 
Pound Nets 

Fyke Nets 
Dip Nets 
Crab Pots 
Eels 
Fish Pots 

Turtle Pots 
Scrapes 
Clam Dredges 
Crab Dredges 
Oyster Dredges 

Oyster Tongs 
Clam Tongs 
Rakes 
Otter Trawls 

Source: U. S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, "Chesapeake 
Fisheries," for years reported. 



493 


389 




256 


23 


43 


61 




87 


113 


6,634 


5,798 


6 


,611 


6,011 


106 


113 




201 


279 


N/A 


242 




203 


147 


506 


431 




485 


335 


1,627 


1,517 


1 


,331 


446 


841 


452 




105 


235 


2,904 


1,983 


2 


,195 


1,131 


447 


316 




575 


592 


377 


1,488 




348 


373 


59 


252 




617 


711 


82,750 


58,000 


45 


,400 


24,030 


7,491 


6,796 


15 


,995 


20,293 


840 


600 


1 


,260 


510 


301 


249 




403 


133 


313 


462 




550 


408 


211 


199 




90 


4 


- 


11 




36 


N/A 


146 


216 




297 


306 


3,981 


4,698 


4 


,454 


4,008 


82 


145 




115 


60 


- 


6 




25 


98 


23 


33 




25 


13 



-79- 



NO. 60 



FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY QUANTITY: 1968 AND 1967 



SPECIES 



1968 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



1967 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



Total, All Species 

Finfish 
Alewives 
Bluefish 
Butterfish 
Carp 

Catfish and Bullheads 
Cod 

Crappie 
Drum, Block 
Eels, Common 
Flounder 
Gizzard Shad 
Hake, Red 
Herring, Sea 
Hickory Shad 
Mackerel, Boston 
Menhaden 
Pike or Pickerel 
Scup (Porgy) 
Sea Bass 
Sea Robin 
Sea Trout 
Shad 
Sharks 

Spanish Mackerel 
Spot 

Striped Bass 
Sturgeon 
Sunfish 
Swellfish 
Tuna, Bluefin 
White Perch 
Whiting 
Yellow Perch 
Unclassified: 
Unclassified: 
and Animal Food 

Other Species 



For Food 

For Bait, Reduction 



55,709 

18,819 

3,963 

136 

17 

128 

352 

48 

2 

22 

246 

424 

30 

8 

9 

7 

49 

4,360 

6 

50 

124 

27 

153 

913 

66 

2 

46 

4,513 

5 

12 

1,129 

1,783 

9 

135 

3 

35 

7 



74,666 

24,347 

2,337 

18 

45 

158 

375 

21 

3 

18 

274 

617 

13 

19 

5 

7 

43 

3,001 

9 

202 

154 

321 

85 

867 

136 

4 

248 

4,150 

7 

6 

3,200 

299 

1,247 

59 

175 

3 

6,215 
6 



(continued on following page) 



80- 



NO. 60 



FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY QUANTITY: 1968 AND 1967 (Cont'd) 



SPECIES 



1968 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



1967 
(1,000 POUNDS) 



Shellfish 

Crabs, Blue 

Hard 

Soft and Peeler 
Lobsters 
Clam Meats 

Hard 

Soft 

Surf 
Oyster Meats, Market 

Other Species 



36,890 

10,347 

9,345 

1,002 

4 

11,466 

526 

5,612 

5,328 

14,874 

190 



50,319 

26,774 

24,588 

2,186 

19 

6,657 

296 

5,212 

1,149 

16,730 

109 



Note: In addition 2,444,848 bushels of oysters were landed in 1968, and 2,651,019 
bushels of oysters were landed in 1967. A Maryland Oyster Bushel contains 
2,800.7 cubic inches. 



(1) 



(2) 



Include Bonito, Croaker, Hogchoker, King Whiting, Mullet, Suckers, and Tautog, 
Include Conch Meats, Squid, Diamond-Back Terrapin, and Snapper Turtles. 



Source: U. S. Department of the Interior, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in con- 
junction with Maryland Department of Chesapeake Bay Affairs, "Maryland 
Landings," 1968. 



81- 



NO. 61 FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY VALUE: 1968 AND 1967 



1968 1967 
SPECIES ($) ($) 

Total, All Species $ 15,993,721 $ 17,357,900 

1,538,900 

40,000 

2,000 

4,000 

4,000 

35,000 

2,000 

200 

1,000 

32,000 

116,000 

300 

400 

100 

1,000 

5,000 

60,000 

2,000 

18,000 

29,000 

3,000 

7,000 

130,000 

3,000 

1,000 

32,000 

675,000 

1,000 

1,000 

67,000 

35,000 

172,000 

2,000 

20,000 

300 

37,000 
700 

15,819,000 

2,552,000 

1,721,000 

831,000 

15,000 



Finfish 


1,728,872 


Alewives 


61,204 


Bluefish 


16,323 


Butterfish 


1,751 


Carp 


2,582 


Catfish and Bullheads 


39,223 


Cod 


4,171 


Crappie 


121 


Drum, Black 


1,553 


Eels, Common 


25,842 


Flounder 


106,292 


Gizzard Shad 


564 


Hake , Red 


217 


Herring, Sea 


186 


Hickory Shad 


212 


Mackerel , Boston 


1,641 


Menhaden 


92,076 


Pike or Pickerel 


1,292 


Scup (Porgy) 


6,012 


Sea Bass 


30,031 


Sea Robin 


278 


Sea Trout 


10,475 


Shad 


101,383 


Sharks 


1,831 


Spanish Mackerel 


279 


Spot 


6,793 


Striped Bass 


920,531 


Sturgeon 


583 


Sunfish 


753 


Swellfish 


35,453 


Tuna, Bluefin 


- 


White Perch 


242,178 


Whiting 


508 


Yellow Perch 


15,060 


Unclassified: For Food 


279 


Unclassified: For Bait, 


Reduction & 


Animal Food 


259 


Other Species(l) 


666 


Shellfish 


14,264,849 


Crabs, Blue 


1,543,681 


Hard 


1,082,353 


Soft and Peeler 


461,328 


Lobsters 


3,218 



(continued on following page) 



•82- 



NO. 61 



FISH CATCH IN MARYLAND, BY VALUE: 1968 AND 1967 (Cont'd.) 



SPECIES 



1968 
($) 



1967 
($) 



Clam Meats 

Hard 

Soft 

Surf 
Oyster Meats , Market 
Other Species (2) 



2,697,898 
292,421 

1,869,705 
535,772 

9,990,452 
29,640 



1,869,000 

152,000 

1,611,000 

106,000 

11,363,000 

20,000 



CD 



(2) 



Include Bonito, Croaker, Hogchoker, King Whiting, Mallet, Suckers, and Tautog. 
Include Conch Meats, Squid, Diamond- Back Terrapin, and Snapper Turtles. 



Source: U. S. Department of the Interior, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 

conjunction with Maryland Department of Chesapeake Bay Affairs, "Maryland 
Landings," 1968. 






83- 



NO. 62 



SEAFOOD PROCESSED PRODUCTS, MARYLAND: 1966-1968 



ITEM 



PER CENT CHANGE 



1968 



1967 



1966 



1967/1968 



1966/1968 



Value 

Wholesale and 
Manufacturing 
Number of 

Establishments 
Persons Employed 

Average Per 

(1) 

Season 

Average Per 
Year 



$43,457,000 $37,180,000 $36,937,398 16.9 



271 



4,919 



3,878 



276 



4,805 



3,620 



283 



5,165 



3,809 



-1 



2.4 
7.1 



17.7 



-4.3 

-4.8 
1.8 



'Derived from dividing the number of employees reported by the number of months of 
operation. 

Source: U. S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 



■84- 



NO. 63 



HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSE SALES, MARYLAND: FISCAL 
YEARS 1965-1969 





TYPE OF LICENSE 


1969 


1968 


1967 


1966 


1965 


Hunting 












County Resident 


49,181 


68,500 


71,717 


71,813 


70,969 


Statewide 


106,701 


114,490 


106,783 


99,039 


91,479 


Junior Statewide 


18,971 










Non-resident 


8,257 


8,369 


7,618 


7,153 


6,966 


Regulated Shooting Area 


592 


669 


701 


354 


289 


Duck Blind 


2,976 


3,016 


2,667 


2,526 


2,442 


Pusher 


3 


5 


6 


12 


11 


Sneak Boat 


107 


124 


98 


95 


101 


Fire Arms Stamps 


69,320 


86,753 


84,656 


76,762 


72,035 



Fishing 



Resident Statewide 


108,671 


125,520 


110,499 


106,927 


98,705 


Non-resident 


5,622 


4,820 


4,410 


4,278 


4,779 


Three Day Tourist 


5,263 


5,970 


5,890 


5,991 


5,237 


Potomac River; Virginia, 












West Virginia 


Ci) 


3,825 


4,211 


4,699 


4,279 


Potomac River; D. C. 


CD 


332 


435 


572 


596 


Live Bait Dealers 


n 


13 


17 


17 


21 


Trout Stamps 


20,498 











Grouped together for Fiscal Year 1969. The total number is 2,302 
Source: State of Maryland, Department of Game and Inland Fish. 



-85- 



NO. 64 



MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MARYLAND 



.CD 



1966-1968 







1968 


1967 


1966 


MINERAL AND UNIT 
OF MEASURE 


QUANTITY VALUE ^ 
($1,000) 


QUANTITY VALUE ^ 
($1,000) 


QUANTITY VALUE ^ 
($1,000) 



Total Mineral Pro- 
duction (Current 
Dollars) 

Total Mineral Pro- 
duction (1957-1959 
Constant Dollars) 

Clays (1,000 short 

tons) 
Bituminous Coal 

(1,000 short tons) 
Gem Stones 
Lime (short tons) 
Natural Gas 

(1,000,000 cubic 

feet) 
Sand and Gravel 

(1,000 short tons) 
Peat (short tons) 
Stone (1,000 short 

tons) 
Value of items that 

cannot be 

(4) 
disclosed 



XX 



XX 



1,078 



(2) 



864 

11,719 
5,554 

13,344 



XX 



$71,844 



69,104 



XX $72,819 



XX 70,776 



1,252 



(2) 



998 



1,462 



XX $74,161 



XX 



856 



(3) 



221 

17,157 
94 

26,606 



21,193 



621 



159 



696 



12,868 17,724 15,108 

WW W 

14,479 28,581 13,868 



XX 20,342 



XX 



72,307 



1,084 



(3 



1,447 


5,318 


1,305 


4,548 


1,222 


4,367 


NA 


3 


NA 


3 


NA 


3 


W 


W 


W 


W 


29,477 


386 



181 

20,383 
W 

27,229 



20,528 



W--Withheld to avoid disclosing individual company confidential data, 
NA--Not available. 



(1) 



(2) 
(3) 
(4) 



(5) 



Production as measured by mine shipments, sales, or marketable production (including 
consumption by producers) . 

Excludes ball and fire clay. 



Excludes ball clay. 

Ball and fire clay (1968 only), ball clay (1966 only), cement (portland and masonry), 
greensand marl, potassium salts, talc and soapstone, and values indicated by symbol 
W. 

All subtotal mineral values are shown in current dollars. 






Source: Maryland Geological Survey, "The Mineral Industry of Maryland," for the 
stated years. 



86- 



NO. 65 



VALUE OF MINERAL PRODUCTION IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: ^ 1966-1968 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



1968 

($1,000) 



1967 
C$1,000) 



1968 
($1,000) 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
St. Mary's 
Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 



Worcester 
Undistributed 



(2) 



$71,844 

2,727 

2,675 

12,880 

W 

W 

w 

3,401 
W 
73 
8,256 

4,538 
1,479 

W 

W 

W 

6,720 
W 
W 
W 
W 

W 
29,097 



$72,819 

2,659 

2,653 

14,035 

W 
W 

w 

3,689 

W 

w 

7,986 

3,685 
1,670 

W 
W 

w 

7,599 
W 
W 

w 
w 

w 

28,845 



$74,161 

2,663 

3,131 

13,628 

W 
W 

w 

3,894 

W 

W 
7,058 

4,002 
1,763 

W 

w 
w 

8,202 

W 

w 
w 
w 

w 

29,820 



Data may not add to totals shown because of independent rounding. 

Baltimore City and Queen Anne's and Somerset Counties are not listed because no 
production was reported. 



(2) 



Includes some sand and gravel (1967 and 1968) that cannot be assigned to specific 
counties, gem stones, and values indicated by symbol W. 



Source: Maryland Geological Survey, "The Mineral Industry of Maryland," for the 
stated years. 



87- 



LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT 

As industry and business have prospered in Maryland so have employment 
opportunities grown. The civilian labor force has grown more than 27 per 
cent between 1960 and 1968, and employment has grown over 30 per cent during 
the same period. Meanwhile the unemployment rate on an annual average basis 
stood at 3.2 per cent of the civilian labor force as contrasted with a national 
rate of 3.6 per cent for the year ]968. 

The major area of growth during the 1960-1968 period was in the non- 
manufacturing segment. Non -manufacturing wage and salary employment as a 
group enjoyed a nearly 49 per cent growth in employment during this period, while 
manufacturing accounted for a growth rate slightly under 8 per cent. 

Services showed the greatest growth during this period, with an in- 
crease of more than 74 per cent, with government, wholesale and retail trade, 
and finance, insurance and real estate following behind services as the growth 
leaders. Only agriculture, mining, and railroad transportation suffered de- 
clines in employment, and the overall gain in transportation was sufficient to 
give even the broader transportation and utilities group a net gain. 



NO. 66 



CIVILIAN LABOR FORCE, EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT IN 
MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1960 



ITEM 



1968 

(ANNUAL AVERAGE) 



1960 

(ANNUAL AVERAGE) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Population (July 1 

Estimate) 
Civilian Labor Force 
As % of Population 
Workers Involved in Labor- 
Management Disputes 
Unemployment 
Employment 

Self-employed, unpaid 
family, and domestic 
workers 
Agricultural employment 
Non-agricultural wage 

and salary workers 
Manufacturing 
Durable goods 
Non- durable goods 
Non-manufacturing 
Mining 

Contract construction 
Transportation and 

utilities 
Wholesale trade 
Retail trade 
Finance, insurance 

and real estate 
Services and 
miscellaneous ,.. 
Federal government 
State and local 
government 



3,755,000 
1,416,700 

37.7 

1,600 

45,400 

1,369,700 



117,400 
25,500 

1,226,800 
280,000 
153,400 
126,600 
946,800 
1,800 
80,700 

76,700 

54,900 

222,600 

63,200 

214,700 
68,500 

163,700 



3,119,600 
1,114,600 

35.7 

1,600 

62,200 

1,050,800 



115,800 
38,600 

896,400 
259,900 
144,900 
115,000 
636,500 
1,900 
61,400 

72,200 

39,300 

151,400 

44,300 

123,200 
47,900 

94,900 



20.4 

27.1 

5.6 

NC 

-27.0 

30.3 



1.4 
■33.9 

36.9 
7.7 
5.9 
10.1 
48.8 
-5.3 
31.4 

6.2 
39.7 
47.0 

42.7 

74.3 
43.0 

72.5 






(1) 



Excludes Federal government employment in Montgomery and Prince George' s Counties 



Sources: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis Division, 
"Labor Force-Employment-Unemployment 1949 to Date," "Non-agricultural 
Wage and Salary Employment." 



89- 



cc 

UJ 

£9 
u 



o 
< 

CQ 



H 


>H 


H 


H 


tu 


X 


2 


E 


Oti 


o 


< 


u 


u 




U- 




u 


>- 


1 — 1 


H 


OS 


2 


CD 


3 


Q 


O 


UJ 


C 3 


Pi 




U- 




OS 




W 




H 


>- 


w 


H 


UJ 


2: 


E 


^ 


U 


o 


& 


u 


o 




Q 




LO 


>* 


w 


H 


_ 


2 


D* 


r> 


< 


o 




u 


u 






>~ 


_ 


H 


1 — 1 


2 


u 


n 


w 


o 


u 


u 


UJ 




2 


>~ 


1 — 1 


H 


J 


2 


o 


3 


QS 


O 


< 


CJ 


u 




H 




os 


>< 


UJ 


H 


> 


2 


_J 


3 


< 


O 


u 


u 






to 


Q 


< 


2 


UJ 


< 


0£ 


-J 


< 






<N 


CS-' 


OJ 


< 


— 


UJ 


UJ 


ci 


«=^ 


< 












UJ 




H 




i — i 



O LO t-O lO O LO lOlOlOlOlOOlOO 

i— I <N • 00 OO CN l/lH^hNN(NO 

O N O IN «* 1*^ t^CNHHO^HvDLn 

* 1—1 * * »* •■. 



to 



LO 


o 


-t" 


LO 


LO 


o 


LO 


LO 


o 


o 


o 


O 


C 


o 


i—l 


LO 




SO 


o 


to 


r- 


LO 


■■*c 


CT, 


vC 


LO 


*tf 


CN 


LO 


tO 


(N 


r— 1 


r*. 


vO 


o 




LO 


LO 


00 


CN 


i— I 


vO 


*\ 






* 


•N 




** 








** 




^ 


* 


-St 






^r 


1— 1 




i — i 








CN 




i— 1 


LO 


1— I 






i— i 


1 1 




i—i 
















LO 


LO 


•=t 


o 


o 


LO 


LO 


c 


c 


LO 


O 


o 


LO 


LO 


•=t 


o 


• 


n- 


vO 


LO 


o 


1—1 


£ 


— 


CT> 


CN 


to 


-r 


r-~ 


vO 


to 


i—i 


r^ 


o 


f-N 


1—1 


£ 


r- 


C7> 


CN 


CC 


i— i 



o 

LO 



tO 



o 
o 



CN 

00 



o 

o 
u- 

o 



> 

•H 

u 



LO 



o 


LO \D LO 


LO 


LO 


CN 


«* • r-- 


<* 


to 


o 


to 00 vO 


o 


CN 



to 



O vO O 

o • o» 
(N LO "sf 



LO 

CT> 
•* 



o 
oo 



LOOOOLOLOOLO 
L0v000tOL0O>— If-H 
vOCNO^LOLOOO^J-i— I 



to 



0)0 

o • o 

r*» CN \D 



CN 

to 



o 
o 
to 



CJ> 



■— I to LO 



to ■* 



o 
o 

vO 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 

NMOHCMvOMh 



o 


LO 


to 


r^ 


CT) 


00 



o 

o 


LO t^ LO 

LO • to 

i— I to en 


o 

LO 


o 
o 

LO 


o 

LO 
CN 


LO 

i r^ 


o 

CO 
CN 


LO LO 
LO CN 


O LO 

cn cr> 
vO i— < 


LO 
00 


O 
O 
CN 


1— 1 
to 


i-H Ol 

CN 


CN 


LO 


1—1 


!— 1 


i—l 


<* 


to r- 


CN 


CN 



O 


LO i— t LO 


o 


o 


o 


o o o o o o 


LO 


o 


00 


rr • to 


CN 


LO 


r-. 


i o vo o •* r- o 


vO 


LO 


to 


ct> r^ -sj- 


LO 


LO 


O) 


vO LO to i— 1 00 LO 


o 


00 



o 

LO 



o 


o 


oo 


o 


LO 


00 



LO 


O 00 LO 


LO 


o 


LO 


O O O LO o o 


LO 


LO 


CN 


a> • to 


o 


00 


CN 


i o ^ to ai o vo 


LO 


[^ 


vO 


cn to to 


•5t 


h> 


vO 


cn r^ oo t to 


o 


00 



O O LO O LO o 


o 


o 


O) M CN O) N LO 


00 


LO 


■— i r^ "* cn 


r^ 


00 



LO 
LO 

•=t 

to 



o 
o 



o 

LO 



o 
o 
-=t 



LO 
CN 



LO 

•^t 

oo 



c 



4-> 

c 

CD 



o e 

P. -M O 

m a: a 

c e 

3 UJ 






i—i 
t/i 

CD 
00 
ctf 



00 

C 

o 

2 



O 
CN 



vO 
LO 



CM lO CM O •* t 

'j lo \o ^r cm •? 



^o 



c 

•H 
4J 

o 

3 

C 



OO 

C 

•H 

DO U 
C ?H 

• H o3 C 

?H 3 O 

3C-h 

+J -p 

U oJ U 

03 3 
LH oo U 

3 C +-> 

C -H 1/1 

rt C C 

E -H o 

C S U 

o 



— 

ctS 
Eh 



o3 t/j 

CD HH 



o 

Ph 

c 



uS- CD 

o o 



w a3 



(i. CO u 



00 
o3 

c 
o 
c 

CD 

•M 

O 



CD 
Fh 

3 
•M 
i—l 

3 
o 

•H 

Fh 

00 
< 



O 
■st 



O 

o 
o 



Fh 
O 

03 



3 

CD V) 

> -H 
^H Q 

O 

> +-> 

C C 

•H CD 

6 

to CD 

c oo 

O 03 

(/) C 

U 03 

CD S 

a. 



o 
oo 

03 
OO 

c 

•H 

o 



o 

c 

o 

T3 
CD 
3 
C 

•H 
+-> 

c 
o 
o 



■90- 





OS 




UJ X 




E- H 




CO 2 




UJ 3 




u o 




Qi U 




o 




3: 




o 




u X 




t-n E- 




s 2 




O 3 




u o 




HH U 




3= 




2 X 


1 


O H 


X 


E- 2 


CO 


O 3 


< 


2 O 


3: 


»-H U 




E- X 




O t- 




02 2 




J X 




< O 




H U 




E- 




UJ 




CO X 




OS H 




UJ 2 




2 3 




C C 




co u 




CO X 




~ E- 




X 2 


• 


OS X 


- 


< O 


X 


2 <_> 




CO X 


2 


- H 


UJ 


UJ z 


UJ 


2 rz> 


3 


2 O 


cx < u 




CO 


w 


UJ X 


c ; 


CJ E- 


2 


OS 2 


- — i 


O 3 


OS 


UJ O 


c_ 


C3 U 




X X 


1 


OS H 


— 


UJ 2 


Z 


"Z. x 


O 


o o 


s 


u u 




X 




E- H 




2 2 




UJ 3 




^S O 




U 








-^. 




UJ 




H 




i—i 



O 


LO Tt LO 


o 


o 


o 


LO O LO O LO LO 


LO 


O 


vO 


[^ • 00 


lo 


tO 


CM 


i cn rt to o r^ -^t 


OO 


LO 


O 


r-^ \o cn 


I s * 


O 


1^ 


"*t CN rt tO rt 0O 


LO 


cn 



vO 



O 

cn 

LO 
LO 



LO 

Cn 



\D 




U 

fn 
O 

uu 

O 



> 

•H 
CJ 



\D 



LO 

00 


o 
to 

.—1 


I-H 


LO 


o 
<* 


LO 

CN 


LO 


LO 

1 o 

CN 


L0 

c 


LO 

r— I 


o 


LO 


LO 

vO 

CI 


LO 

o 


o 

LO 
(N 


CN 


1— ( 




\D 

cn 


CN 
CN 


h* 


LO 
i—l 


i — 1 


i— i 


LO 




CN 


to 


to 


■—I 


o 
o 

LO 


o 

I-H 

LO 


cc 

LT, 


o 
i— i 


LO 

to 

C7> 


LO 
CN 
CM 


o 

1 — 1 


O LO 


L0 

Cft 

cc 


LO 

cn 


LO 

CC' 
CC 


o 
cc 


o 
en 

LO 


LO 
LO 


o 
o 


to 


CM 




o 


LO 

to 


1—1 


CN 


i— ( 


CN 


\D 




to 


LO 


to 


I—l 


o 

LO 

00 


LO 

i— 1 

to 


cn 

CN 


LO 

to 

LO 


o 

00 


o 
o 
to 


O 
LO 


o 
1 to 

LO 


LO 

cn 
to 


o 

CO 


o 

CJ 


cc 

L- 

o 


LO 

o 
"5t 


LO 
"5* 

o 


o 

LO 



vO 



00 



LO 


O \D LO 


o 


o 


o 


i—l 


—1 • O 


cn 


"* 


LO 


vO 


to ^ to 


en 


oo 


. — 1 


•* 


*» 


»» 






vO 


vO 


to 




to 



LO LO C 
vO • O 
CN i— I O 

CN to 

LO 



O CN LO 

■^r • cn 

1— I r— I tO 



o 
o 
en 



LO 

to 



LO 

cr, 



LO 

!— I 



i—i i— i >^t 



O O C LO O LO 
N 't M N \D N 
CN .—I 00 tO "3" 



LOLOLOLOOOOO 

o •— ivoooocnto 

i— I 00 Cn O tO -— ILOtO 



CTi 



to 



o 

CN 
(N 



■— I LO \D vO CN ■— I 
i—l tO CN LO 



LO O LO LO LO O 

O CM r— < LO VO VO 

CT> 00 CM 00 CN ■— I 



to r^ cn ■— i 

to *3" 



vD 



tO 



W) 



+-> 

C 

e c 

O E 

i-H CD X 

Dh -P o 

E CtJ r-l 

as cu 

C E 

=> UJ 



ctS 

i— i 
ni 

CO 



0) 
CxO 
03 
3 



DO 

C 

o 



CD • 

13 UJ 

^H OS 



3 E- 
i 



DO 

c 

•H 

3 
o 

a3 



•H 03 C 

^ 3 O 

3 O/'H 03 CD 

4-> +-» 

O cU O 



O 
00 



LO 


O N LO 


o 


o 


o 


LO O LO LO LO O 


LO 


O 


to 


^f • cn 


CN 


vO 


vO 


1 CTi CM O t-~ O \D 


CN 


LO 


cr> 


t^- O i— I 


i-H 


00 


CN 


i— I \D CN i— I 


to 


r- 



LO 


LO to o 


o 


c 


o 


LO LO LO LO O O 


O 


o 


LO 


vo • <y> 


CN 


to 


cn 


1 "3" vD sC 00 i— I CN 


CN 


LO 


o 


to to \0 


i — 1 


CN 


CO 


LO "v3" LO i— I i— l O 


vO 


cn 



o 
"3- 



o 
o 

00 

cn 



o 
cn 



vO 



LO 

00 



o 
o 
to 



o 
o 

LO 



o 
to 



cr. 


O "* LO 


LO 


o 


LO 


LO o o o o o 


o 


o 


o 


r^ • cn 


on 


vO 


to 


1 ^D Cn \D LO LO CN 


LO 


LO 


cn 


to LO ^r 




i—i 


*fr 


to cn en i— i LO ■— i 


1 — 1 


r-. 



LO 

to 



o 

03 



03 if) 



•M crS 



u5 C 



X 



<w m ^ a 



O UJ CD CD 



O O 



C 4-> 
H (/) 

c c 
o 



U E- 



00 CD C 

C W 03 

03 .-I C 

^ x: -h 



tt. wu 



03 

c 
o 

c 

!h 
CD 



3 
o 

■H 
f-i 
DO 

< 



3 

T3 CI, 

<D V) 

> -H 

h a 
o 

> +-> 

c c 

• H CD 
E 

C oo 

O o3 

to C 

fn 03 

CD S 



L0 

o 

•H 
+-> 

0) 

E 

o 

13 

T3 
C 
03 

to 
U 

CD 

^: 
fn 
o 
3 



03 
lm 

•H 

nJ 

c 

3 



T3 
CD 

O 

i-H 

Ph 

E 
<u 

lh 
i—i 

m 

10 

CD 
T3 

3 

i-H 

o 



tA 

CD 
•H 
+J 

c 

3 
O 

u 

13 
03 



13 
C 
03 

13 

O 
<4-l 

u 

o3 

X 



o 
u 
u 

03 
U 



03 

03 



i—l CD 

• H 13 

C 
3 

< 



CD 
C 
C 
< 



X 



c_> 
U 

o 

E 



03 
CQ 

00 
CD 

13 
3 

i-H 
CD 

e 



o3 

•H 

cs 

•H 

DO 

u 

•H 
> 



X 

4-> 

c 

3 
O 



13 

c 

03 



X 

4-> 

c 

3 

o 
u 

X 

c 

03 
bO 
CD 



L0 

CD 

13 
3 

.—I 
o 
c 



c 
o 

•H 

oo 

•H 

> 
• H 

a 

oo 

•H 

oo 
X 

i-H 

03 

C 
< 

13 

■3 

OS 

CD 
00 
CD 
OS 



X 

+J 

•H 

3 


CO 

■P 

c 

E 
X 

o 

i-H 
Oh 

E 

UJ 

4-1 

O 



c 


E 

-M 

^H 

03 

Oh 



a 

13 

c 

o3 

i-H 

X 

5h 
03 



X 
XI 

13 


X 
oo 

•H 
C 
^1 

3 
cw 

03 

4-> 

o3 

13 

13 


X 

oo 



J3 
3 
O, 

c 




o 

5-4 

3 
O 
CO 



-91- 



NO. 68 PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1960 






TYPE 1968 1960 

Total Employment 100.0 100.0 

Agriculture 1.9 3.7 

Non- agricultural wage and 

salary employment 89.6 85.3 

Manufacturing 20.4 24.7 

Durable goods 11.2 13.8 

Non-durable goods 9.2 10.9 

Wholesale and retail trade 20.3 18.1 

Service and miscellaneous 15.7 11.7 

Contract construction 5.9 5.8 

Transportation and utilities 5.6 6.9 

Government^ -* 17.0 13.6 

Finance, insurance and real estate 4.6 4.2 

Mining .1 .2 
Self-employed, unpaid family, and 

domestic workers 8.6 11.0 

Totals may not add due to rounding. 

Excludes Federal government employment in Montgomery and Prince George's Counties. 

Sources: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis Division, 
"Labor Force-Employment-Unemployment 1949 to Date," "Non-agricultural 
Wage and Salary Employment." 



-92- 



NO. 69 NON- MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND, ANNUAL AVERAGES 

1968 AND 1960 



TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT 



1968 
(1,000) 



1960 
(1,000) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Total Non-manufacturing 

Employment 1,089.7 

Total Non-agricultural, Non- 
manufacturing Employment 1,064.2 
Non-agricultural, Non- 
manufacturing Wage and 
Salary Workers 946.8 

Wholesale and Retail 

Trade 277.5 



Government 


232 


2 


Service and Miscellaneous 


214 


7 


Contract Construction 


80 


7 


Finance, Insurance and 






Real Estate 


63 


2 


Transportation, Excluding 






Railroad 


35 


7 


Public Utilities and 






Communications 


28 


9 


Railroad Transportation 


12 


1 


Mining 


1 


S 


11 Other Non-agricultural 






Non-manufacturing Employ- 






ee 2 ) 
ment J 


117 


4 


'icultural Employment 


25 


5 



790.9 

752.3 

636.5 

190.7 

142.8 

123.2 

61.4 

44.3 

33.3 

22.4 

16.5 

1.9 

115.8 
38.6 



37.7 
41.5 

48.8 

45.5 

62.6 

74.3 
31.4 

42.7 

7.2 

29.0 
-26.7 
- 5.3 

1.4 
-33.9 



Excludes Federal government employment of approximately 65,000 in Montgomery and 
Prince George's Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan Area 
Statistics. 



(2) 



Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers, and domestics in private households 



Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 

Wage and Salary Employment," and "Labor Force, Employment, and Unemployment." 



•93- 



NO. 70 NON-MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND, RANK BY PER 

PER CENT OF TOTAL: 1968 

PER CENT OF TOTAL 



TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT 1968 1960 

Total Non-manufacturing Employment 100.0 100.0 

Total Non-agricultural, Non- 
manufacturing Employment 97.7 95.1 
Non-agricultural, Non-manufac- 
turing Wage and Salary Workers 86.9 80.5 
Wholesale and Retail Trade 25.5 24.1 

Government *■ ' 21.3 18.1 

Service and Miscellaneous 19.7 15.6 

Contract Construction 7.4 7.8 
Finance, Insurance and Real 

Estate 5.8 5.6 
Transportation, Excluding 

Railroad 3.3 4.2 
Public Utilities and 

Communications 2.7 2.8 

Railroad Transportation 1.1 2.1 

Mining .2 .2 

All Other Non- agricultural, Non- 

(2) 
manufacturing Employment 

Agricultural Employment 2.3 4.9 

Excludes Federal government employment of approximately 65,000 in Montgomery and 
Prince George's Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan Area 
Statistics. 

(2) 

Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers, and domestics in private households.: 

Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 

Wage and Salary Employment," and "Labor Force, Employment, and Unemployment.' 



manufacturing Employment 10.8 14.6 



■94- 



NO. 71 NON-MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT 


IN 


MARYLAND, RANK BY PER 


CENT CHANGE: 


1968 


AND 


1960 














PER CENT CHANGE 


TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT 










1960/1968 


Total Non-manufacturing Employment 










37.7 


Service and Miscellaneous 










74.3 


Government 










62.6 


Wholesale and Retail Trade 










45.5 


Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate 










42.7 


Contract Construction 










31.4 


Public Utilities and Communications 










29.0 


Transportation, Excluding Railroads 










7.2 


Mining 










-5.3 


Railroad Transportation 










-26.7 



All Other Non-manufacturing, Non- 
agricultural Employment 1.4 

Agricultural Employment -33.9 



Excludes Federal government employment of approximately 65,000 in Montgomery and 
Prince George's Counties, which is included in Washington Metropolitan Area 
Statistics. 

(2) 

Includes self-employed, unpaid family workers, and domestics in private households. 

Sources: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non-agricultural 

Wage and Salary Employment," and "Labor Force, Employment, and Unemployment." 



■95- 



NO. 72 



DISTRIBUTION OF MARYLAND STATE EMPLOYEES, 
SUBDIVISION: APRIL 1970 



(1) 



BY POLITICAL 





POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


' POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


POLITICAL 


NUMBER OF 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


SUBDIVISION 


EMPLOYEES 


Maryland 


28,246 










Allegany 


784 


Frederick 


523 


Talbot 


178 


Anne Arundel 


3,770 


Garrett 


172 


Washington 


1,013 


Baltimore City 


7,888 


Harford 


377 


Wicomico 


672 


Baltimore 


4,583 


Howard 


586 


Worcester 


140 


Calvert 


130 


Kent 


83 






Caroline 


124 


Montgomery 


488 


Other 


2,285 


Carroll 


1,494 


Prince George 


s 1,184 






Cecil 


201 


Queen Anne's 


272 






Charles 


153 


St. Mary's 


270 






Dorchester 


698 


Somerset 


178 







(1) 



Does not include employees of the State Roads Commission or employees of the 
University of Maryland. 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by the Central Payroll Bureau, 



NO. 73 



DISTRIBUTION OF MARYLAND STATE ROADS COMMISSION 
EMPLOYEES, BY WORKING LOCATIONS: MAY 19 70 



LOCATION 



NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES 



Maryland 

Total Districts 
District 1(1) 
District 2(2) 
District 
District 
District 
District 
District 7' 

Bridges ^ 8 ^ 

Baltimore City Administrative 

Statewide Assignments 



3( 3 ) 

4(4) 

r(5) 

6(6) 
(7) 



4,502 

2,255 
177 
343 
418 
335 
454 
234 
294 

551 

676 

1,020 



(1) Includes Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties. 
(2) Includes Caroline, Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's, and Talbot Counties. 
(3) Includes Montgomery and Prince George's Counties. 
(4) Includes Baltimore and Harford Counties. 

(5) Includes Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's Counties. 
(6) Includes Allegany, Garrett, and Washington Counties. 
(7) Includes Carroll, Frederick, and Howard Counties 

(8) Includes all personnel at the Chesapeake Bay, J. F. Kennedy, Potomac River, 
and Susquehanna River Bridges and the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel. 



■96- 



NO. 74 ARMED SERVICES PERSONNEL IN MARYLAND AND UNITED STATES: JUNE 30, 1969 



JURISDICTION MILITARY CIVILIAN TOTAL MILITARY § CIVILIAN 



Maryland 






Army 
Navy^ 1 ) 
Air Force 


28,854 
21,745 
10,173 


24,193 

14,274 

4,206 


Total Department 
of Defense 


60,772 


42,673 


United States 






Army 
Navy Uj 
Air Force 


826,220 
520,869 
596,025 


409,368 
387,771 
292,047 



53,047 
36,019 
14,379 



C2 ) 

112,991 L } 



1,235,588 
908,640 
888,072 

Total Department 

of Defense 1,943,114 1,089,186 3,105,527 

Includes Navy and Marine Corps. 

(2) 

Total Department of Defense column will not add across due to employment by 

other defense activities, e.g., Defense Supply Agency and Office of the 

Secretary. 

Source: Directorate for Information Operations, Office of Secretary of 
Defense, Washington, D. C. 



■97- 



os 


vO 


f- 


vO 


co 


en 


_D 


i— i 


a 




z 


•> 


i— i 


r~- 




vD 


>- 


en 


CQ 


i—i 


p. 




Q 




PJ 


00 


>H 


\0 


O 


CI 



E- 



-J 

< 1^ 

U ^O 

CO CTi 



< OO 

U \0 

CO CD 

I— I i—l 



UJ UJ 



U 



-J 

< r- 

co en 

i — i i—i 



— 1 

< oo 

U vO 

co en 



Ph 



H 




2 




LU 


PJ 


r J 


r J 


os 


§ 


cu 


X 


Cu 


u 


— 1 




< 


r~- 


U 


vO 



co en 



< 00 

co en 



pi 

E- 
co 

a 



en 
oo 



o 
oo 



oo 



00 i—l 



CM 



00 

en 



LO 



"tf \D 



cm h- 
cm r- 



o 

CM 






CM O 



00 \D 

en 



oo 



CM 
CM 



tO 



LO 

LO 



00 
CM 



o 



o 
to 



00 



CM 



00 



\D 


r^ 


to 


1—1 


CM 


^o 


t~^ LO 


en 


r^ 


r-- oo 


CM 


00 


O 


i—i 


00 


»* 


^r 


*t 


r-- to 


en 


CM 


LO LO 


CM 


<tf 


00 


i—i 


1 — 1 


o 


LO 


i—i 


i—i i—i 


SO 


i—i 


vO LO 


vO 


en 



tO tO 



to 


CM 


LO 


vO 


\D 


en 


to 


LO 


to 


o 


CM 


i— ( 


o 


^r 


\C> 



en 



to 

o 



to to 



LO 



00 

to 



oo 



to 



vO 



CM O 



vO en 

CM 



vO 



LO 

to 



o 

CM 



o en 



t^- oo 
en 



i 



to 



to 



00 

to 



r^- 


vO 


vO 


^r 


CM 00 


CM 


to 


en cm 


00 


"5t 


^r 


LO 


LO 


sO 


LO 


LO LO 


vO 


o 


O LO 


vO 


\C 


o 




o 


i—i 


en 


I—l 


I—l 


1—1 


i— 1 to 




o 


r— 1 



vO 



CM 



CM 



CM 


to 


r^ 


r-- 


\o to 


en 


to 


LO to 


to 


to 


^ 


o 


%£> 


en 


en 


en 


00 o 


CM 


00 


cm r^ 


LO 


[-« 


<tf 


LO 




r- 


to 


en 


i— i i—i 


i—i 


CM 


to to 




o 


i-H 


vO 



1—1 


^r 


CM 00 


1—1 


CM 


en 


LO 


en 
to 




o o 

00 i—l 


1 


\D 


i 


en 

CM 



en 



CM \D 


vO 


<tf 


n- oo 


"* 


00 


en 


en 


CM "3" 


CM 


CM 


00 i—l 


00 


o 


en 


h» 


i—l i—l 


^t 


CM 


r— 1 \0 


LO 


o 


i—i 


00 



00 
CM 



vO 


r^ 


O 


r-< 


00 


o 


en to 


i—i 


o 


vO O 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


vO 


i—i 


rf 


en 


o 


o 


cm en 


vO 


to 


\£> i—l 


en 


i—l 


CM 


en 


vO 


■— i 


(N 


o 


r- 


1—1 


to i-H 


00 


CM 


r^ en 


v£> 


o 


to 


i—i 


*\ 




•\ 


#N 


•\ 


*\ 












•\ 




•* 


to 

1 — 1 




to 


^O 


i — i 


1—1 












CM 




i-H 


1—1 


LO 


r- 


en 


to 


r-. 


oo en 


LO 


[^ 


en i—i 


r»« 


r— 1 


to 


en 


r-* 


to 


i—i 


CM 


o 


o 


o ^r 


LO 


o 


o en 


to 


00 


^ 


CM 


o 


T— 1 


i-H 


CM 


o 


■—I 


to CM 


LO 


LO 


LO en 


vO 


o 


to 


LO 





W> 




























+J 


















C 




W) 
















L0 








C 














5h 


to 


•H 




c 
















i-H 






•a 


cu 






i—l 








a> 


<U 


X 




•H 


T3 














OS 






c 


E 






•H 








X 


•H 


5-i 




Jh 


0) 








t>0 






+-» 






rt 


P, 






03 




<U 




+-> 


5-i 


U 




3 


Jh 








bO C 






0) 








•H 






+-> 




O 




o 


+-> 


aS 




+J 


T3 








C -H 






s 






C 


P 




to 


CD 




C 


0) 




tO 


P 




o 


C 








■H X 








T3 


en 


o 


cr 




CD 


Pi 




oS 


4-> 


1—1 


P 


<y 


c 


03 


•H 




T3 




+-> !/) 






T3 


C 


♦J 


•H 


w 




•H 






5h 


OS 


1—1 


*0 




o 


<+-l 


^ 




C 




q -h 




T3 


<U 


oS 


C 


+J 






+J 


T3 




P 


+J 


< 


C 


-a 


•H 


3 




V) 


oS 




• H i— 1 




C 


■P 




93 


OS 


cu 




•H 


c 




to 


to 




i — i 


c 


■!-» 


C 


T3 


4-" 




i — i 


f-l X3 


to 


nj 


oS 


X 


E 


*J 


o 


?H 


i—l 


oS 




C 


UJ 


T3 




o3 


O 


o3 


C 


u 


CO 


(D 


CU 3 


i-H 




o 


5-i 


3 


fH 


c 


o 


•H 






i—i 




c 


i—i 




3 


*?.. 


oj 


3 


<u 


u 


o- 


Oj 


X 


•H 


a> 


S 


o 


rt 


X 


+-> 


<D 






i-H 


03 


r-H 


W> 


5h 






13 


1—1 


K3 


•\ 


O 


'H 


5-i 


c 


*j 


P. 


c 


•M 


3 


i—i 




* 


aj 




< 


c 


+-> 


i—i 


-a 


O 


•H 


& 


5-i t3 


•H 


03 


,o 


•H 


to 


CO 


-o 


o 




oS 




(D 


<D 


a» 




•H 


W 


oS 


o 


'm 


•M 


& 


<U C 


E 


E 


as 


X 


c 


C 


h 




O 


to 


d) 


O 


CC 


o 


i — 1 


e 


C 


+-> 


o 


Cu 


X! 


< 


Ph OS 


O 


>H 


PU 


o 


I—l 


rt 


o 


i-H 


•H 


CU 


T3 


C 




•H 


a3 


•H 


o 


O 


tu 




a> 




03 


X 


'M 




03 




f-i 




1—1 


i-H 


1—1 


03 


OS 


-n 


> 


■M 


S 


u 


E-i 






H 




a, 


U 


Cu 




2 




H 




< 


X) 


o 


5-i 


e 


c 


5-i 


O 


































P 
CL, 


§ 


H 


•H 


oS 


CU 
CO 



to 
to 



Ph 



00 
vO 

cn 



5h 
O 

Ph 
(1) 

DC 



03 

P 

c 
c 
< 



■p 

•H 

5h 

P 

o 

CD 
CO 

*J 

c 

(U 



Ph 

6 
U 

t+H 

o 

CU 

E 

■!-> 

5h 

oS 

Ph 
CU 

a 

c 

OS 

i-H 

5-i 
oS 



CU 
O 
5h 
P 
O 
CO 



-98- 



"3- 

sO 

c 



[N 

sO 
CTi 



00 
sO 



co 

< 

UJ 

X 

< 
u 

CO 



CO 
UJ 
I— I 
H 
I— I 

> 

I—l 

E- 

u 
< 

UJ 

E- 

< 

CO 

o 
X 

< 



3 
CO 



X 

E- 

i—i 

Q£ 

U 
UJ 
CO 

E- 

UJ 



o 

Cu 

PJ 

U. 
O 

2 

UJ 

< 

CL, 
UJ 
Q 



sO 

in 



o 

2 



oo 

o 



UJ 



2 oo 

UJ sO 
U CTi 

cc \ 
uj r-- 

a. 



< 

UJ 

X 

< vO 
U CTi 

CO l-H 



a: 

< 

UJ 

x 

-j 
< 
c_> 

CO 



< 
UJ 
X 



< 
CO 

uu 



■<*■ lo in in 



en 



LO to sO 



Ol vO M Oi 
rsi (m to to 



sO <— I •<* LO CTi 

cm rsi rsi lo to 



O 00 00 

.—i in o 
i— i on in 



to \o *$■ in 



tO H O M 
(N (N (N 



\Q to to 


i—l 


o 


to 


LO 


CN 


in 


lo so ct. 


in 


I— 1 




LO 


CT 


• 


tO O CN 


CN 


• 


CN 


to 


to 


in 


•\ ^ *\ 


*\ 


CM 


i — ( 


^ 


* 


i — i 


CTi to sO 


to 


to 




sO 


in 




i— I to 00 


r*-> 






CTi 


i— i 




CM i— 1 


CN 













in to -3- so 

r^- ■ — t \o < — • 

t^ (M LO \£> 

N N LO \D 

LO CTl L0 •— I 

.-4 in 



■be- 



■— i to LO o In 
in • lo to 
• a> to en oo 

CD " - 
tO i— I LO 

IN 



00 oo o to 

00 LO to 'd" 

CTi In CN CN 

^t in i^ oo 

LO CTl LO sO 

.-h in 



LO IN O 00 IN 

In . CM vO 

• CTl tN in o 

O •> •> ,— i 

^ CM In 

IN 



o 

I—l 

Ph 

E 
O 

c c 

as 3 
Fh 

3 

to +-> 

C aS 

l-H 4-> 

CO 
■M 

c - 

to 

R.S 

O 4-> 

•— ( -H I— t -H -H T3 10 05 O 



10 

E 
as 
In 

DO 

o 

O- 

a> 
o 

c 

to 
C 



CJ 



aS o aS 

•H 4-> C_> 

aS DO -H 



to 

+-> 

C 



E 

aS ^ 
C- to 

l-H 

X as 

X) i— I -H 

CD ^ +-> 

E 5h 

• h aS 

(SS Q. 



to 
4-1 

•H 

4h 

^ 

to C 

^ CD 

CD 03 
CD 

^- ' c 



■!-> tO 
•H +-> 
4-1 -H 

CD <4-t 
C CD 
CD C 

03 
OQ 
OO 
C M 

■H C 



C > 

O -H 

•H CD 

+-> O 

aS 

u cc 
3 

Q to to 



to 

aS 

x 

UJ 



CD 



a, > 

E -H -M .H 

<-) c c 

C O H-l 

=3 < E 



O <C 





U X 

UJ 

> ^ 

< 



c c c 

DC aS aS 
E E t-J 



aS aS 

> r-H 



< u u a 



i i i i 



IN ,-| IN 

00 o o 

00 IN 00 

•\ »\ •> 

^t 00 \D 

^O "* M 



tO CTl >—i 00 

00 00 O 00 

IN 00 \D CM 

#\ »v »\ «\ 

LO CTl CD O 

(N 00 00 O 



^H 


to 


CM 


o 


CTl 


to 


vO 


co 


— 


i-H 


l—l 


to 


i—l 


r i 


CTl 


CN 


O 


"!t 


LO 


In 


00 



O i— I 00 00 ffl H I^ 

^ tO tO ON vO 00 00 



CTl "3" In 

O vO 00 

IN ,_| IN 

*» 9\ •» 

\0 LO LO 

rr to "3- 



LO 00 tO LO 

•^- i— i O i— i 

i—l 00 to LO 

IN 00 .—I IN 

cn ^r in in 



to 



•H 
+-> 
■rH 

> 
•H 
4-1 

O 

< 

i—l 

tO -H 

o c UL. 
o 



> 

aS 
CO 



+-> u 

4-> to <C 

C -H 

DC 

E DC 

xa: as 

O 5-i 

--I 2 

Oh > 

E Z < 

UJ 

■99- 



to 

•H 

C 



tO TD 

S < 


•H t/1 

> +-> 

fn (O 



•M E- 

C 

i-i fn 


DO JO 

C E 
■H 3 

i-l 2 

-o 

to i—i 
C aS U 

3 +- 1 
O O +J 



00 CN (N tO O 

LO <0 i— I CTi "t 
CN SO In i— I CN 



^fvOON 


SO tO CTi O O 


i-t "Nf LO 


lo cm in oo 


SO LO i— 1 CTi CN 


i—l tO IN 


CM *3- r- 1 r— 1 tO 


t (NO 


st (N N H 


tO i— I LO -^t o 




tO CN 


r-H CN 


i— I r— ' i— 1 


tO tO i—l 



u 

3 

T) +J H 

^h aS 

O 3 5h 

aS O 3 



a. f-> i— i 

do 3 

to aj o 

U i -H 

c u 

^. O DO 

fH Z < 

o 



CN <5fr CN LO ^r 



o 

sO 



CN O 



CN LO 

• to 



" « to LO 



LO CN 

CN CN 

O sO 

i— 1 LO 

IN v£) 



CN 

■&e--&<3- 



CTi In 



sO 

to 



00 to "3- .—I sO 
O CTi tO tO CTi 



00 

o 



LO 



"3- 

o 



LO 
CN 



sO O 

tO CN 

O sO 

In CM 

IN LO 

to to 

sO 
CN 



cn CN IN CN CN 

"3" CTi 00 sO i— I 

o oo 



LO 

to 



CN "* 
tO CN 

IN 

CN 

^e--&e- 



• sO 
to •> 

i-H CTi 

i—l 00 

LO 

IN 

CN 




US 

a: 



If) 



> ^ 

• rH o 

4-> fn 

o x 



3 
X2 



c 

DO 

aS E 
3: 
to 
X 5h 
—i 3 
^ X> 
{X to 

X -H 



aurng a 



aS +J 

•H i— I X DC DC -H 



as 

.-I U 
Pu 
> 



<^S cm 



•h H UJ < 



to 

I—l 
o 



<3- 

|N 



sO 
CTi 



CTi 
LO 

CTi 



tO 
SO 

sO 



IN 

sO 
CTi 



CN 

to 

00 



CTi 
O 

IN 



00 
sO 
CTi 



to 

o 



u 

<4H 

o 

u 


•i 

3 

c 
to 

4-> 


E 

to 

fH 

3 
to 



<4-l 


c 


CQ 



T3 

4-> 

as 



to 
U 

a 

x 

o 

M-i 



to 

4-> 

fH 
O 

Pu 


CC 



aS 

3 
C 

c 
< 



X 



5h 

3 
o 


CO 



c 

E 
X 

o 

1—1 

Ph 

E 
UJ 

<4-l 

O 



c 


E 

4-1 
f-l 

aS 
Ph 

Q 

-3 

C 

cd 
i—i 

X 

u 

aS 




o 
u 

3 

o 

CO 



oo 

en 






u 

H 












00 
vO 



X 

E- 
i— i 
> 
i — i 
E- 



to 



CM 



oo to 


tO 


o 


^r 


OWiOOl 


M H M N 


^ ^t 0O N 


o r- 


LO 


to 


o 


■-H o to I~- 


NMOM 


O LO to O^ 


r- lo 






CN 


i-HJ i— 1 (N i— 1 

1 1 1 


LO CM to tO 

i-H i— 1 


CM H tO i— I 
1 1 1 



LO \D 


LO 


r-- 


h- 


i— I CT> C"> ^D 


\£> to r— i r^ 


r-~ cm ^n \o 


O \0 
CM .— 1 


1 


«* 


CM 

■— 1 
1 


^r to cm r^- 


vD i-i 1 00 to 


CM CT> vD CT> 

i-H 1 1—1 1 

1 1 



1 — 1 


^f o\ 


G) 


to 


r-> 


i— 1 i— 1 rf VO 


O vO O to 


r- cr> oo o 


■St 


tO LO 


"* 


CM 


vO 


^f M vO ^ 


LO CT) 00 00 


\D O CI \D 


r^ 


CM '* 


I— 1 


CT> 


*3- 


r-~ vo vo ^t 


^r cr> to 


*t \o to rr 



00 


00 CTl 


00 


00 


CT> 


<* 


\D \£> 


vO 


r^ 


o 


r^ 


>—i <Ji 


to 


r^- 


00 



tO i—l 



00 vD 



to "* \0 CM 



oo r^ \o lo 

"* tO "3- vO 

i^- o> en oo 

i— I ^- "3- r— I 



C7i CM ^H LO 
\D ^ CH to 
CT> CM LO i— I 



vO O CM r^ CM 

•— ( 00 vO 00 •>* 

00 CM CM i— I O 

tO CM CM CH LO 



vO W O h 

CM CM CJi O 

CM i— I O O 

CM LO LO CM 



m \D m ^r 

O) (M N O) 

CM CM 00 t— I 

CM i-H 



S H ^f H 



0> « O N 

o ^ r-- cti 

00 O "3" CM 

\D CM to i— < 



CM vO tO to 

rt l/l H N 

en oo en i— i 



LO 



CM 















-a 










































<u 










































u 
































t/> 








-O 


rt 
































s 








a) 


i — i 
































(D 








> 


Ph 
































• H 






T3 


•H 














bO 




















> 






<D 


(U 


w 












C 




















u 






fn 


o 


!h 












•H 






























<D 







<f> 








i-H 




















+-> 






+-> 


Jh 


^s 




C 



























l/> 


c 






to 




fH 




o 








l/> 


















C 


■H 






•H 


to 


o 




•H 








c 


















o 








£ 


bO 


5 




■(-» 








3 


















■H 


bO 






•H 


C 






rt 








o 










(/) 








4-> 


G 






E 


•H 


4h 




?H 








o 










■P 








rt 


•H 






13 


C 


O 




+-> 


















C 








?H 


r— < 






rt 


<D 






V) 








.— < 



















4-> 











a, 


fH 




•H 








rt 










6 








10 


V) 






to 


o 







bO 








• H 



















•H 


C 






+-> 




Xi 













+H 










o 








bO 


3 






t/i 


^3 


E 




H 






fH 


■H 








fH 


rt 






fH 





o 






0) 


o 


3 













c 











i-H 









5h 


o 






+-> 


■r-| 


C 




i-H 


w 




> 

o 


•H 




(/) 




> 

O 


Ch 


Ifl 




> 

o 


X 


X 






X 


X 


X 




X 


u 






X 




fH 






X 


^H 






1 — 1 


I-H 






i-H 


i-H 


i-H 




+-> 


rt 




-a 


i-H 




rt 




T3 


i-H 


rt 




-a 


X 


X 






X 


X 


X 




c 


O 


V) 


c 


X 







tn 


C 


X 





w 


c 


■M 


+-> 






•M 


■t-> 


+-> 




o 


X 


fH 


rt 


+-> 




X 


rn 


rt 


+-> 


X 


fH 


rt 


c 


c 






c 


c 


c 




6 




rt 




c 


W 




rt 




c 




rt 




o 


o 






o 


o 


o 






CM 





to 


o 


S 


CM 





to 


o 


CM 





to 


6 


e 




. — i 
rt 


E 


e 


a 







CM 


X 


Sh 
rt 


6 


o 

■H 


CM 


X 


fH 

rt 


E 


CM 


X 


fH 

rt 


0) 





^H 


■ H 


<D 


cu 







rt 


5h 


-t 








> 


fH 


^r 








fH 


^f 





M 


bO 


rt 


+J 


bJO 


M 


bO 





U 





«* 


>> 


bO 


fH 





-i- 


X 


bO 





Tl- 


X 


rt 


rt 


*-> 


•H 


rt 


<n 


rt 


bO 





"ZJ 


i 




rt 


o 


"D 


l 




rt 


X) 


1 




fH 


fn 


o 


c 


U 


u 


!h 


< 


> 


C 


CM 


LO 


5h 


♦J 


c 


CM 


LO 


fH 


C 


CM 


LO 








H 


1 — 1 





<u 







< 


— 


CM 


^3" 





C 


:d 


CM 


"* 





3 


CM 


^r 


> 


> 






> 


> 


> 


>, 










> 


•H 








> 








< 


< 






< 


< 


<C 


03 










< 










< 









U 
rt 

X 



+-> 

rt 



o 

4h 



4-1 

fH 
O 

ex, 


OS 



rt 

c 
c 
< 



X 



fH 

o 


CO 





X 



. 


Ph 


bO 


E 


C 


W 


• H 




-o 


LM 


c 


o 


3 




o 


+H 


fH 


c 







o 


E 


4-» 


+-> 




fH 





rt 


3 


(X 


-o 







a 


T3 




T3 


T3 


rt 


C 




rt 


«J 


i — i 


o 


X 


C 


fH 




rt 


X 


S 


rt 




E 




to 





i-H 


O 


rt 


fH 


+-> 


3 


o 


o 


H 


to 



-100- 



NO. 78 



WORK STOPPAGES IN MARYLAND AND UNITED STATES: 1965-1969 



(1) 
(2) 



STOPPAGES BEGINNING 
IN YEAR 



MAN DAYS IDLE DURING YEAR 













PER 


CENT OF 








WORKERS 




ESTIMATED TOTAL 
WORKING TIME*- 1 - 1 


YEAR 


JURISDICTION 


NUMBER 


INVOLVED 


NUMBER 


1969 


(2~) 
United States^ ' 


5,700 


2,481,000 


42,869,000 




.28 




Maryland 


81 


38,200 


594,600 




.22 


1968 


(2) 
United States^ ' 


5,045 


2,649,000 


49,018,000 




.32 




Maryland 


64 


33,300 


530,300 




.20 


1967 


United States^ J 


4,595 


2,870,000 


42,100,000 




.30 




Maryland 


64 


35,200 


285,000 




.12 


1966 


(2^ 

United States v * 


4,405 


1,960,000 


25,400,000 




.18 




Maryland 


41 


12,700 


139,000 




.06 


1965 


(2^ 
United States^ J 


3,963 


1,550,000 


23,300,000 




.18 




Maryland 


44 


14,600 


349,000 




.16 



Private nonfarm. 

Stoppages extending across state lines have been counted separately in each 
state affected; workers involved and man-days idle were allocated among the 
states. 






Source: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, "Work Stoppages," 
for years stated. 



101- 



MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT AND PAYROLLS 

While the primary cause of economic growth has been in the non-manufac- 
turing sector, certainly manufacturing represents a major factor in Maryland's 
economy, with nearly 23 per cent of the non-agricultural wage and salary employ- 
ment. Annual average employment in manufacturing was 280,000 employees in 1968, 
representing a growth of nearly 8 per cent over the 259,900 employment figure 
for 1960. 

In the same eight year period four industries, electrical, machinery, 
printing and publishing, machinery, excluding electrical, and rubber and mis- 
cellaneous products, stood out for their rapid growth in employment. These 
industries all had increases in excess of 35 per cent in employment. In the 
decade 1950 to 1960 it is interesting to note that the industries leading in 
employment growth were electrical machinery, pulp, paper, and paper products, 
and printing and publishing. 

Despite a rather stable manufacturing employment level, payrolls in- 
creased significantly in the period from 1960 to 1968. Manufacturing payrolls 
increased by 49 per cent during this period, a figure attributable primarily 
to wage and salary increase. Only Delaware, in the mid eastern region had a 
significantly greater percentage growth. The largest manufacturing payrolls 
in Maryland during 1968 were in the primary metals, transportation equipment, 
and food and kindred products industries. 

Average weekly earnings for all manufacturing in the State rose over 
35 per cent during the eight year time period, from $90.63 to $122.61, with 
average hourly earnings rising nearly 37 per cent from $2.26 to $3.02. 

Value added figures in 1967 are led by the primary metals, food and 
kindred products, and chemicals and allied products industries. While ranking 
somewhat below other mid eastern states in value added it certainly is to be 



-102- 



noted that Maryland experienced a percentage growth of more than 58 per cent 
over the 1958 to 1967 time period. 

Historically, Baltimore City has been the dominant location for 
manufacturing firms in Maryland. In 1968 that political subdivision had 
over 43 per cent of the firms and nearly 39 per cent of the manufacturing 
employment in the State. Next in order, in terms of number of firms, but 
far behind, are Baltimore (240), Prince George's (171), Montgomery (149), 
Anne Arundel (104), and Washington (98) counties. 



the difference between the value of goods and the cost of materials or 
supplies that are used in producing them. Value Added is derived by sub- 
tracting the cost of raw materials, parts, supplies, fuel, goods purchased 
for resale, electric energy, and contract work from the value of shipments. 



-103- 



NO. 


79 


MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND BY STANDARD 


INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION, 










ANNUAL AVERAGES: 1968, 


1960 










CODE 






INDUSTRY 






NUMBER OF 


EMPLOYEES 


SIC 




1968 


1960 


All 


Manu 


facturing 


Total 






280,000 


259,900 


Durable 


Goods 


Total 






153,400 


144,900 


24 








Lumber d, Wood Products 






3,600 


5,000 


25 








Furniture § Fixtures 






6,100 


5,300 


32 








Stone, Clay § Glass Products 






10,400 


10,200 


33 








Primary Metal Industries 






40,400 


42,200 


34 








Fabricated Metal Products 






24,100 


24,200 


35 








Machinery, Excluding Electrical 






16,000 


11,700 


36 








Electrical Machinery 






21,000 


14,400 


37 








Transportation Equipment 

Other Durable Goods (Scientific 
struments § Miscellaneous 
Manufacturing) 


In- 




25,000 
6,800 


25,900 
6,000 


Non- 


-durable Goods 


Total 






126,600 


115,000 


20 








Food § Kindred Products 






37,500 


38,100 


22 








Textile Mill Products 






2,600 


2,800 


23 








Apparel § Related Products 






24,300 


22,900 


26 








Paper § Allied Products 






10,100 


8,400 


27 








Printing 8, Publishing 






18,900 


13,700 


28 








Chemicals £ Allied Products 






17,000 


16,300 


30 








Rubber § Miscellaneous Plastic 
Products 






12,300 


9,000 


31 








Leather $ Leather Products 
Other Non-durable Goods 






2,800 
1,100 


2,600 
1,200 


Source: 


State of 
Wage and 


Maryland, Department of Employment 
Salary Employment." 


Security 


, "Non-agricultural 










-104- 











NO. 80 MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND, 
RANK BY PERCENTAGE OF CHANGE: ANNUAL AVERAGES 1968 AND 1960 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



All Manufacturing Total 
Durable Goods Total 
Non- durable Goods Total 



36 

27 
35 
30 
26 
25 

32 
31 
23 
28 
34 
20 
37 
33 
22 

24 



Electrical Machinery 
Printing £j Publishing 
Machinery, Excluding Electrical 
Rubber § Misc. Plastic Products 
Pulp, Paper § Paper Products 
Furniture £, Fixtures 
Other Durable Goods 
Stone, Clay $ Glass Products 
Leather § Leather Products 
Apparel £ Related Products 
Chemicals § Products 
Fabricated Metal Products 
Food § Kindred Products 
Transportation Equipment 
Primary Metals Industries 
Textile Mill Products 
Other Non- durable Goods 
Lumber $ Wood Products 



280,000 


259,900 


153,400 


144,300 


126,600 


115,000 


21,000 


14,400 


18,900 


13,700 


16,000 


11,700 


12,300 


9,000 


10,100 


8,400 


6,100 


5,300 


6,800 


6,000 


10,400 


9,600 


2,800 


2,600 


24,300 


22,900 


17,000 


16,300 


24,100 


24,200 


37,500 


38,100 


25,000 


25,900 


40,400 


42,200 


2,600 


2,800 


1,100 


1,200 


3,600 


5,000 



7.7 

6.3 

10.1 

45.8 

38.0 

36.8 

36.6 

20.2 

15.1 

13.3 

8.3 

7.7 

6.1 

4.3 

.4 

1.6 

3.5 

4.3 

7.2 

8.3 

28.0 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non- agricultural 
Wage and Salary Employment." 



105- 



NO. 81 RATE OF INDUSTRY GROWTH, MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT IN MARYLAND, 
RANK BY 1960/1968 GROWTH RATE: 1960/1968 AND 1950/1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
SIC INDUSTRY 1960/1968 

36 Electrical Machinery 45.8 

27 Printing $ Publishing 38.0 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 36.8 

30 Rubber and Misc. Plastic Products 36.6 
26 Pulp, Paper £ Paper Products 20.2 

25 Furniture d, Fixtures 15 . 1 
Other Durable Goods 13.3 

32 Stone, Clay £ Glass Products 8.3 

31 Leather £ Leather Products 7.7 

23 Apparel £ Related Products 6.1 

28 Chemicals $ Related Products 4.3 

34 Fabricated Metal Products - .4 
20 Food § Kindred Products - 1.6 

37 Transportation Equipment - 3.5 

33 Primary Metals Industry - 4.3 

22 Textile Mill Products - 7.2 
Other Non-durable Goods - 8.3 

24 Lumber $ Wood Products - 28.0 

PER CENT CHANGE 
SIC INDUSTRY 1950/1960 

36 Electrical Machinery 118.2 

26 Pulp, Paper § Paper Products 64.7 

27 Printing § Publishing 31.7 

32 Stone, Clay $ Glass Products 24.7 

33 Primary Metals Industry 23.4 

35 Machinery, Excluding Electrical 23.2 

25 Furniture $ Fixtures 15.2 
Other Durable Goods 0.0 

20 Food $ Kindred Products - 1.8 

28 Chemicals £ Related Products - 3.0 

37 Transportation Equipment - 7.2 

23 Apparel § Related Products - 10.2 
31 Leather § Leather Products - 18.7 

34 Fabricated Metal Products - 18.7 

24 Lumber § Wood Products - 19.4 
22 Textile Mill Products - 41.7 

Other Non-durable Goods - 87.8 

30 Rubber § Misc. Plastic Products N/A 

Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Non Agricultural 
Wage and Salary Employment." 



-106- 



NO. 82 MANUFACTURING AND NON-MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS IN MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1960 



TYPE OF PAYROLL 



1968 1960 PER CENT CHANGE 

($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 1960/1968 



Total 



$ 10,429 



$ 



5,355 



94.8 



Manufacturing 
Non-Manufacturing 
Government 

Federal Civilian 

Federal Military 

State and Local 
Wholesale and Retail Trade 
Services 

Contract Construction 
Transportation 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 
Communications and Public Utilities 
Mining 



2,114 


1,353 


56.2 


8,315 


4,002 


107.8 


3,547 


1,477 


140.2 


1,855 


767 


141.9 


512 


250 


104.8 


1,180 


461 


156.0 


1,626 


912 


78.3 


1,377 


583 


136.2 


604 


338 


78.7 


408 


285 


43.2 


451 


238 


89.5 


289 


156 


85.3 


13 


13 


NC 



Sources: U. S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, "Survey 

of Current Business," August 1969, Vol. 49, No. 8, p. 16. 

U. S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, "Survey 

of Current Business," August 1963, Vol. 43, No. 8, p. 10. 



-107- 



NO. 83 MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS IN MARYLAND, RANK BY 

DOLLAR VALUE IN 1968: 1968 AND 1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
SIC INDUSTRY 1968 1960 1960/1968 

All Manufacturing Total 2,020,229,721 1,355,798,640 49.0 

Durable Goods Total 1,240,557,974 851,027,917 45.8 

Nondurable Goods Total 779,671,747 504,770,723 54.5 

33 Primary Metal Industries $ 348,238,983 $ 263,423,828 32.2 
37 Transportation Equipment 220,023,054 183,458,657 19.9 
20 Food and Kindred Products 218,103,999 158,439,908 37.7 
36 Electrical Equipment and Supplies 149,289,450 88,308,373 69.1 

27 Printing and Publishing 133,930,063 71,770,444 86.6 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 125,537,375 70,382,767 78.4 
35 Machinery, except Electrical 121,081,471 65,327,911 85.3 
23 Apparel and Related Products 115,187,130 76,525,726 50.5 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 102,364,914 74,632,830 37.2 



30 Rubber and Plastics Products, NEC 83,093,503 43,393,625 91.5 

32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 76,933,995 49,472,063 55.5 

26 Paper and Allied Products 68,323,729 42,915,976 59.2 

25 Furniture and Fixtures 32,775,116 21,407,721 53.1 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 17,951,286 16,419,672 9.3 

22 Textile Mill Products 14,176,519 25,557,676 -44.5 

All Other Durable Goods 171,899,705 88,576,862 94.1 

All Other Nondurable Goods 21,319,426 15,784,601 35.1 

Source: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis 
Division, "Employment and Payrolls Covered by the Unemployment 
Insurance Law of Maryland," for years stated. 



-108- 



NO. 84 



NUMBER OF MANUFACTURING FIRMS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1968, 1964, 1960, 1955, 1950 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



1968 



1964 



1960 



1955 



1950 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



2,757 



2,958 



3,222 



3,206 



3,100 



58 


68 


82 


80 


71 


104 


101 


113 


78 


64 


,195 


1,328 


1,507 


1,656 


1,743 


240 


223 


204 


161 


123 


18 


21 


16 


11 


9 


38 


45 


52 


59 


56 


73 


79 


89 


88 


83 


56 


55 


67 


68 


60 


23 


28 


30 


23 


20 


71 


82 


85 


70 


70 


69 


75 


86 


76 


76 


21 


31 


41 


38 


36 


51 


61 


69 


67 


51 


29 


28 


24 


27 


22 


23 


23 


25 


24 


21 


149 


142 


133 


124 


81 


171 


154 


144 


119 


74 


24 


20 


28 


10 


10 


25 


29 


36 


30 


22 


46 


48 


58 


42 


47 


54 


63 


60 


53 


47 


98 


110 


115 


124 


126 


83 


93 


102 


108 


121 


38 


46 


56 


70 


67 



Undistributable 



NA 



NA 



NA 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Employment Security, "Employment 

and Payrolls Covered by the Unemployment Insurance Law of Maryland," 
second quarter issue for the stated years. 



109- 



NO. 85 MANUFACTURING PAYROLLS, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES, REGIONALLY 

RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH: 1967 AND 1958 



REGION AND STATE 



1967 



1958 



PER CENT CHANGE 



($1,000,000) ($1,000,000) 1958/1967 



United States 

MIDEAST 
Delaware 
New Jersey 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 
New York 

SOUTHEAST 
Tennessee 
Georgia 

South Carolina 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
Kentucky 
Alabama 
West Virginia 



$ 131,876 $ 78,349 



68.3 



573 


348 


64.7 


6,368 


4,066 


56.6 


1,961 


1,257 


56.0 


10,477 


6,776 


54.6 


13,927 


9,628 


44.7 


2,242 


1,103 


103.3 


2,179 


1,075 


102.7 


1,462 


732 


99.7 


2,946 


1,487 


98.1 


1,877 


987 


90.2 


1,341 


721 


86.0 


1,611 


920 


75.1 


819 


574 


42.7 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1967," 

Preliminary Report, General Statistics for States, Series MC 67 (P) -2 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1958," 
General Statistics for States, various pages. 



•110- 



NO. 86 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES ENGAGED IN MANUFACTURING, MARYLAND AND SELECTED 

EASTERN STATES, REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH IN TOTAL EMPLOYEES: 

1967 AND 1958 







ALL WORKERS 


PRODUCTION WORKERS 


PER CENT GROWTH 


REGION AND STATE 


1967 1958 


1967 1958 


ALL WORKERS 




(1,000) (1.000) 


(1,000) (1,000) 


1958/1967 



United States 



19,398 



16,025 



13,975 



11,681 



21.0 



Mideast 
Delaware 
Maryland 
Pennsylvania 
New Jersey 
New York 



68 
288 

1,569 
894 

1,967 



58 
259 

1,402 
795 

1,916 



35 
206 

1,146 
609 

1,307 



30 
190 

1,034 
564 

1,303 



17.2 
11.2 

11.9 

12.5 
2.7 



Southeast 
Tennessee 
Georgia 
Kentucky 
North Carolina 
Virginia 
South Carolina 
Alabama 
West Virginia 



419 
424 
224 
627 
339 
299 
292 
124 



283 
314 
162 
461 
258 
226 
230 
116 



329 
341 
175 
524 
267 
249 
236 
97 



221 
261 
125 
392 
204 
194 
189 
90 



48.1 
35.0 
38.3 
36.0 
31.4 
32.2 
27.0 
6.9 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1967," 

Preliminary Report, General Statistics for States, Series MC 67 (P) -2 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1958," 
General Statistics for States, various pages. 



Ill 



NO. 87 VALUE ADDED BY MANUFACTURE, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES, 
REGIONALLY RANKED BY RATE OF GROWTH: 1958 AND 1967 







VALUE 


ADDED 






REGION AND STATE 


C$1, 


000,000) 




PER CENT CHANGE 




1967 






1958 


1958/1967 


United States 


$ 259,301 




$ 


141,444 


83.3 


Mideast 












Delaware 


906 






420 


115.7 


New Jersey 


12,569 






7,499 


67.6 


Pennsylvania 


18,864 






11,423 


65.1 


New York 


25,171 






15,892 


58.4 


Maryland 


3,766 






2,394 


57.3 


Southeast 












Georgia 


5,034 






2,102 


139.5 


South Carolina 


3,035 






1,360 


123.2 


Tennessee 


4,822 






2,207 


118.5 


Kentucky 


3,673 






1,769 


107.6 


North Carolina 


6,377 






3,083 


106.8 


Alabama 


3,661 






1,771 


106.7 


Virginia 


4,042 






2,123 


90.4 


West Virginia 


2,186 






1,264 


72.9 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1958, 
General Statistics for States," various pages. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1967, 
General Statistics for Geographic Divisions and States," Preliminary 
Report, MC 63 (P) -2. 



-112- 



NO. 88 VALUE ADDED BY PRINCIPAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND, RANK 

BY DOLLAR VOLUME: 1967 AND 1958 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



1967 
($1,000,000) 



1958 PER CENT CHANGE 
($1,000,000) 1958/1967 



All Industries 

20 Food and Kindred Products 

33 Primary Metals Products 

37 Transportation Equipment 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

36 Electrical Machinery 

27 Printing and Publishing 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

35 Machinery, excluding Electrical 

23 Apparel and Related Products 

32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 

26 Paper and Allied Products 

30 Rubber and Plastics Products, N. 

25 Furniture and Fixtures 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 

38 Instruments and Related Products 
22 Textile Mill Products 



E.C. 



790.6 


$ 2,394.4 


58.3 


530.7 


326.3 


62.6 


524.4 


430.1 


21.9 


463.4 


394.8 


17.4 


422.3 


192.5 


119.4 


374.5 


185.7 


101.7 


211.5 


99.1 


113.4 


204.5 


135.4 


51.0 


198.9 


105.3 


88.9 


192.0 


119.0 


61.3 


160.9 


94.3 


70.6 


133.8 


74.8 


78.9 


112.9 


74.0 


52.6 


38.8 


29.8 


30.2 


36.6 


23.6 


55.1 


29.3 


(D) 


(D) 


20.0 


18.9 


5.8 



(D) Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1967," 
Preliminary Report, Area Series, Maryland, Series MC 67(P)-21. 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1958," 
General Statistics for States, various pages. 




•113 






NO. 89 VALUE ADDED BY PRINCIPAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES IN MARYLAND, RANK BY 

PER CENT CHANGE: 1967 AND 1958 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1958/1967 



All Industries 



58.3 



28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

27 Printing and Publishing 

36 Electrical Equipment and Supplies 
35 Machinery, except Electrical 

26 Paper and Allied Products 

32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 
20 Food and Kindred Products 

23 Apparel and Related Products 
25 Furniture and Fixtures 

24 Lumber and Wood Products 

30 Rubber and Plastics Products, N.E.C. 

34 Fabricated Metals Products 

33 Primary Metals Industries 

37 Transportation Equipment 
22 Textile Mill Products 



119 
113 

101 



4 
4 
7 

88.9 
78.9 
70.6 
62.6 
61.3 



55 
55 
52 



51.0 



29, 
17, 

5. 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1967," 

Preliminary Report, Area Series, Maryland, Series MC 67 (P) - 21. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, "U. S. Census of Manufactures: 1958," 
General Statistics for States, Various pages. 



114- 



NO. 90 



AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
IN MARYLAND, RANK BY DOLLAR VALUE IN 1968: 1968 AND 1960 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



All Manufacturing Average 
Durable Goods Average 
Nondurable Goods Average 

37 Transportation Equipment 

33 Primary Metals Industries 

32 Stone, Clay, and Glass Products 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

35 Machinery, except Electrical 

27 Printing and Publishing 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

36 Electrical Equipment and Supplies 
26 Paper and Allied Products 

20 Food and Kindred Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 

23 Apparel and Related Products 
31 Leather and Leather Products 



$ 122.61 


$ 90.63 


35.3 


135.96 


101.96 


33.3 


105.87 


77.21 


37.1 


157.54 


108.38 


45.4 


151.01 


111.79 


35.1 


132.18 


100.30 


31.8 


131.14 


102.91 


27.4 


129.43 


99.47 


30.1 


126.94 


97.04 


30.8 


124.92 


92.84 


34.6 


117.09 


92.40 


26.7 


110.30 


88.68 


24.4 


105.15 


75.95 


38.4 


88.15 


67.80 


30.0 


79.78 


57.35 


39.1 


78.56 


52.88 


48.6 



3 

i 
ai 



Source: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis Division, 
"Non- Agricultural Wage and Salary Employment." 



a 

i 



115- 



NO. 91 



AVERAGE HOURLY EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 
IN MARYLAND, RANK BY DOLLAR VALUE IN 1968: 
1968 AND 1960 



SIC 



INDUSTRY 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



All Manufacturing Average 
Durable Goods Average 
Nondurable Goods Average 

37 Transportation Equipment 

33 Primary Metal Industries 

27 Printing and Publishing 

34 Fabricated Metal Products 

35 Machinery, except Electrical 
32 Stone, Clay and Glass Products 

28 Chemicals and Allied Products 

36 Electrical Equipment and Supplies 
26 Paper and Allied Products 

20 Food and Kindred Products 

23 Apparel and Related Products 

22 Textile Mill Products 

31 Leather and Leather Products 



3.02 


$ 2.26 


33.6 


3.30 


2.53 


30.4 


2.66 


1.94 


37.1 


3.76 


2.73 


37.7 


3.63 


2.83 


28.3 


3.23 


2.42 


33.5 


3.23 


2.51 


28.7 


3.18 


2.45 


29.8 


3.11 


2.36 


31.8 


3.01 


2.27 


32.6 


2.92 


2.31 


26.4 


2.62 


2.02 


29.7 


2.59 


1.88 


37.8 


2.21 


1.58 


39.9 


2.15 


1.67 


28.7 


2.03 


1.41 


44.0 



Source: Maryland Department of Employment Security, Research and Analysis Division, 
"Non-Agricultural Wage and Salary Employment." 



-116- 



TRADE 

The trade area encompasses retail trade, wholesale trade, and selected 
services within the State. Figures developed by the United States Bureau of the 
Census in its censuses of business are quite revealing. 

On a statewide basis, the total number of establishments engaged in re- 
tail trade grew from 23,901 in 1963 to 25,009 in 1967, a gain of nearly five per 
cent. However, total sales over the same period of time grew 37 per cent, from 
$4,237,061,000 to $5,804,582,000. All segments of retail activity increased 
their sales volume, with general merchandise group stores leading (55.3 per 
cent), followed by furniture, home furnishings, and equipment stores (45.8 per 

cent), and gasoline service stations (40.8 per cent). The smallest percentage 

<• 
growth in sales was in the building materials, hardware, and farm equipment dealer 

m 
category (12.8 per cent), followed by nonstore retailers (26.7 per cent), and 

l 
eating and drinking places (31.3 per cent). 

m 

Wholesale trade activity likewise showed substantial growth over the 1963- 

m 
1967 time period. Overall sales rose more than 33 per cent, from $4,473,736,000 

J 

to $5,956,830,000 while the total number of establishments increased nearly eight 

3 

per cent, from 3,658 to 3,943. All categories but two, farm products-raw materials 
(-18.4 per cent), and tobacco and its products (-4.1 per cent) posted gains. The 
sales growth leaders were electrical products (74.8 per cent), machinery (55.5 
per cent), furniture and home furnishings (55.4 per cent), and beer, wine, and 
distilled alcoholic beverages. Lesser percentage growth areas were in motor 
vehicles and automotive equipment (11.5 per cent), and lumber and construction 
materials (17.1 per cent). 

The selected services segment of trade activity posted, in percentage 
terms, the greatest growth between 1963 and 1967. Total receipts in 1967 were 
$1,143,943,000 as opposed to a 1963 corresponding figure of $705,999,000, a 



117- 



growth of 62 per cent while the total number of establishments grew from 13,840 to 
16,923 (22.3 per cent). Miscellaneous business services led in this segment with 
a gain of nearly 96 per cent in receipts, followed by automobile repair, automobile 
services, and garages (76.1 per cent). The smallest percentage increase was in 
motion pictures (10.3 per cent) while other amusement and recreation services 
increased 19.5 per cent. 






118- 



CD 



UJ 
L3 

2 
< 

cn 

E- -I 

uj to 

U vO 

cn 

Qi i—l 

uj 

CX 



2 

< 

U ^O 

cn 

E- -H 

m to 



— , 



to 



o 
to 

CM 

CN 

00 
LO 

o 

00 
LO 

■&e- 



o 
cn 



to 
cn 



cn 
o 

o 



oo to ^r lo oo r^ 



00 M 00 00 N Nl/iml^CTl^fOOHlrtOi'tO 



CM LO CN LO O tO 

i— I LO to to ^ to 



tO CN O i— I CN ^f 

h H \0 H H Ol 
\D OO l/l (N (M Ol 



lo i— i r-» r^ \o 
■^ to to to CM 



r^ cn oo oo r^ 
o oo r- r-~ tj- 
oo o cn to o 



KlHO>CTlCOCO' , *(NLnLOCO'* 

tor— i cn to to i— ir~-rsiLOtototo 

I 



vOsorMLOo^ooi— ilooo-vTooo 

tOMCOvOMOflMTfOCON 

r^-cncnoocncNoot^'vDt^oo 



t^ \D O i— I ^3" O 
00 ■— I CN v£> 00 CN 
<— I vO O !*■» CM CN 



to CN CM 00 i— I CN 
N \D I s - CTl O H 
\D \0 00 vO i— l LO 



i— I t^- 00 tO LO 
\0 to f- LO i— I 

I— I tO I— I tO i— I 



lo \o lo cn en 

lO Ul 1/1 H >c 

oo r-- i^ en r~^ 



toor^cno'3-cni— lOOvotor^- 

■^3- t — i — I >C H N H <J M ^t 



o cn cn cn 
w oo h- oo 

00 00 i—l LO 



v£> ^o to -%r so t^ r^- 

oo vO\D o m ai <j 

00 vO CN t-- Tf CN i— I 



r— I t*- O i — I O LO 

r— i lo lo to o cn 
cn en to O "3" CM 



LO CN LO vD LO 

to "3- Tj- 00 *3- 

N ^t M ■* H 



NHNI^iOl/ll^(N\DLn^t'* 

i/iooLnai^MooNvONHiO 
cn oo cn o~i h ^r h \o in vo 



LO 



vO 


rf r~^ i— I 00 o to 


oo oo r^ h to 


^r 


\0 Tf 00 CN tO tO 

1— 1 1— I 
1 1 


I*-- i— I \D to 
CN CN 

1 1 



ootocntOLooo^rc~i*=3-LOLOcn 



cn oo rr r^- r^ \D 

\D OO 0(N N O 

CTi N H (M vO m 



t lO \C H rt 

lo i— i n- to cn 

H H CO (M CM 



NvO'tCMKlOOOhLniO 
i— I i—l CN CM 

III I 



ooo^r^cNOOCMi^a^or^ 

LOLO'^tOtOOO'd-O^OCNO 
vD tO i— I i— I \D CN CN LO i— I CN i— I 



LO «— I CN i— I i— I LO 



i— I "^ C> ^" 00 \0 
O O 00 00 LO LO 

cn cn vD to r^- lo 



Tt \D (N f) (N 
rf N to N CT> 
CN O 00 O LO 



to 



to r-» i— i\ooi^o s icr^tocNjoo 

<JOlOO)HNOOCMO>OMO 
cn ^" i- 1 \0 CM N \0 H CM H 



LO 
CM 


tO 


as 

5 




CO 
CD 
Fn 
O 
4-> 
CO 

ex 


^t- 


1— 1 


CN 

CO 


•—1 

CO 

CD 


co 

&n 
c 


rH 


LO 


co 


"*■ 


i— 1 


to 


c 


E 

Ph 
•H 

3 

cr 

UJ 


> 

•H 


CO 
4-> 

a 

3 
X) 

o 
u 

EX 



i—i 

^i 
as 

a, 
a, 
< 




CO 

1—1 
as 

•H 




4-1 

c 


E 
D-, 

•H 

3 

cr 
cq 

60 

c 






CO 
4-" 
O 

3 
O 






T3 




3 






C 


f-l 


•H 




CO 











4-> 


•H 











4-> 




u 


?H 






ft 


t/) 


O 






o 


O 


X 







^ 








O 


i— 1 


co- 




4-> 




as 






CX 


CO 




as 


Fn 


u 






•H 


4-> 


CO 




o 


o 


i — i 






E 


i — 1 






J3 









UJ 




i— I 




X 





CJ3 






fJ 


CO 


■H 




rt 


4-> 




, ^ 




o 


< 


- 




2! 




-r- 




• 


E 


as 






1 — 1 








rt 




C 




i— i 


CO 


CO CN 




4-> 




CO 












2 


3 


•H 




" 


cd 


CD 






4-1 


X 


^H 




Cu 







1 ' 




3 


uD- 


C 




S 


CO 


** 









Jh 




co 


o 


to 




co 


co 


^ 


3 






X 


u 


CO 




< 




O 




aS 


4J 


bo 




■N 


i—l 







i—i 


a 


•H 




h 




o 


IX, 


co 


OO 


h 


o 


U 






•V 


• r-i 




Qi 


U 


C 




CO 


o 


+-> 




aS 




T3 




o 


<D 


CO 







C 


rd 


4J 







co- 


co 


4-< 






3 


• 1-1 




I—l 


u 


as 




•H 


4-> 


C 




1 — 1 


O 


co 





h 


•H 


4-> 


CO 


i—i 






i—i 


o 




i 


-^ 


X) 




rt 


4-» 


^ 




Jh 


c 


as 




d 


•H 


<D 


£ 


o 


^ 







■H 





co 


ai 


2 






O 






h 












o 


X 




OJ 


> 


O 


O 


4-> 


c 


•H 


10 


aS 


T3 





CJ 






CO 


h 


3 







CX 







4-> 


E 


o 




a 


^1 


o 


~ 


CO 


• H 


h 


3 


4-J 


a! 


H 


•H 


*N 




4-> 


a, 


i — i 




C 




4-> 





aS 


P. 


u 


LO 




<D 


< 






fH 


&H 


o 





?H 


o 


E 


CO 









cx 




• H 


CO- 


CO 


TJ 


2 


•H 


<D 


<D 





in 




i 


±-1 


Q 


o 





a: 


H 


•H 





-o 




3 


i — i 






«-. 




as 


rt 




3 


S 


Fh 


> 




US' 





c 




h 


C 






^: 


X! 


O 


CO 


-a 


aJ 




X 




E 


S 


t-> 


GO 


cr 




O 


>H 


<D 




^ 


o 


vO 


c^ 


aS 











D 


o 





o 


CJ 





Fh 


uO 


3 




E- 


c 


LU 


i—i 


4-> 


+-> 


C 


. — 1 


3 


E 






i — i 


?H 


i—i 


> 




C3 


•H 


fn 


•H 


?H 










cO 




•H 




aj 


LO 


O 


•H 


CD 


4-> 


C-, 


be uj 


i—i 


o 


d 




* 




fi 


a. 


U 


as 


c 


co 


i— i 




- — i 


ID 


s 


U 




s 


i—l 


^ 


•H 


•H 


C 







+J 


co 


^H 


co 





O 




4-> 


2 


•H 


r— 1 


o 


CX 


■ H 


i—i 


*H 


CD 


T3 


o 


o 


as 


c 


3 


•H 


D£ 


o 


co 





o 


M 


o 


a 


E 


O 


T3 


X 


aS 


fn 


aS 


Cfl 


•H 


Rj 


C 


O 


4-1 


co 


Ph 


u 


cr +-> 


3 


co 


c 


r—i 


+-> 


3 





o 


R 





^ 


o 


+-> 


4-> 


U 


4-> 


3 


IX, 


CD 


o 


g 


ct 


Ph 


- 


UJ 


as 


fi 


•H 


o 


o 


o 


S 


■H 


t-< 


as 


i — i 


as 


rt 


o 





o 





OQ 




C3 


i±- 


< 


CJ 


< 


tu 




UJ 


Q 


S 


2 




2 


Q 


cx, 


CJ 


u. 


1X1 


X 


»^. 


S 


CX 


CO 





bC 
aS 
CX 

bO 

C 

•H 

S: 

O 



c 
o 



3 

C 



9 

3 



119- 







en 




, — , 


, ,. 










o 




Ia) 


N) 




i- 






c 




*. — ^ 


*> — * 










4 


P 


1 — 1 


i — I 


P 


t— i 






o 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 






CD 


Cl 


o 


O 


Cl 


o 






</) 




I— 1 


►—i 




t— ' 








"3 


c 


c 


O 


C 








4 


Cl 


Cu 


r-t 


CL 








CD 


CD 


CD 


~ 


CD 


c 


C 


cr 


O 






CD 




• 




• 


H- 


P 


3 


4 










o 


3 


P 




►— ' 


co 


CO 


CO 


c 


3 


H- 


4 


H- 


• 


• 


• 


in 


in 

CD 


t— • 


CD 
rt 


3 


CO 


CC 


CO 


t/i 


3 


O 


P 


O 


c 


c 


c 


rt 


CD 


4 


H» 


4 


4 


4 


4 


O 


3 


Cl 


1— ' 


v . 


CD 


CD 


CD 


3 


rt 


CD 






03 


P 


03 


CD 




4 


in 


P 


3 


C 


C 


10 


P 




rt 


3 








to • 


3 


3* 


O 


rt 


o 


o 


o 




Cl 


O 


4 


H- 


i-h 


i-h 


Hi 


p 




c 


o 


JO 








4 


in 


in 


in 


C 


rt 


rt 


rt 


rt T3 


CD 




CD 


3^ 


— 


3* 




O 


in 


3 




CD 


CD 


CD 


C7P 


4 


V. . 


o 


P 








O 


r+ 




rt 


3 


n 


n 


n 


o 


M- 


3 




Cl 


CD 


c 


CD 


Cl 


3 


CD 


CD 




3 


3 


3 


in 


CJQ 


4 


h- ■ 


in 


W 


in 


W 






n 


10 


CD 


3 


3 


C 


P 


era 


3" 


CD 


O 


17) 


t/i 


in 


3 


O 


P 


£ 


O 


w 


<• 


V 


CL 


O 


3 


— 


3 










Cl 


CL 


CD 


CL 


n 


n 


n 


P 


in 


H- 


4 




CD 


CD 


CD 


CL 


to . 


in 


CD 


^J* 


3 


3 


3 


< 




H- 




P 


in 


in 


in 


CD 


cr 


3 


O 


3 


3 


C 


3 


4 


o 


(K3 


i — i 


Cl 


t/i 


in 


in 


r+ 


o 




P 


*# . 








H- 


?r 


3 


t/1 




o 


o 


o 


in 


01 


P 


in 


in 


H> 


Hj 


i-h 


h" 


v 


o 


H- 


^3 








3 




3^ 


H^ 


O 


CD 


— 


CO 


CTO 


T3 


P- 


H* 


4 


c 


C 


c 




CD 


3 


CD 


rt 


w 


O) 


w 


in 


4 


CD 


Cl 


H- 


H- 


H- 


H- 


►3 


H- 




• 


3 


3 


3 


3 


CD 


o 


O 




era 


CD 


CD 


CD 


O 


Cl 


*3 






10 


in 


W 


H- 


H- 


CD 




tra 


in 


10 


in 


P 


O 


4 




o 


V* 


to 


w 


1 — i 


P 


P 




o 








r+ 


1 — ' 


rt 




Cl 


t— ' 


1— ' 


t— ' 


H 1 


W 


o 




in 


to 


to 


tO 


CD 


v. 


4 






CT> 


OS 


o 


in 




in 




P 


--4 


sl 


s] 


to . 


p 


* . 




3 


* 


" 


* 


P 


3 
Cl 


P 




Cl 


~ 


- 


- 


3 




3 




cr 


en 


■^ 


?o 


CL 


3 


Cl 




M- 


CD 


z* 


CD 




CD 






o 


i—" 


o 


rt 


O 


s 


Cl 




v; 


CD 


h— ' 


P 


r+ 


w 


H- 




o 


O 


CD 


H- 


3-^3 


4 




i — i 


rt 


10 


I—" 


CD 


p 


CD 




CD 


CD 


03 




4 


■3 


O 




* . 


CL 


i — i 


H 




CD 


rt 








CD 


4 


n_1 


4 






< i. 


CO 




P 


4 


in 


in 




CD 


CD 


H 


Cl 


o 


to . 


CD 




£ 


4 


4 


CD 


Cl 




>— ■ 




CD 


< 


- 




3 


H+l 


i—" 




i— ■ 


h- 1 - 


CL 




n 


P 


M- 




4 


o 


CD 


s: 


r+ 


4 


3 




v; 


CD 


• • 


p 


in 


3 


3Q 




v* • 


</) 




4 












• • 


■<• 


x 




en 


CD 




Hi 




03 


i—" 




C 


in 




c 


2 


4 


p 




►3 


r-f 




CD 


P 


X 


3 




>3 


BL 




►— ' 


4 


i — i 


Cl 




>— ■ 


cr 






X 


03 


to 




H- 


i—' 




P 


►— • 


3 


— 




CD 


H- 




3 


P 


Cl 






in 


in 




Cl 


3 


to 


CO 




to • 


3" 






CL 


~ 


n 






3 




H- 


* 








<_i. 


CD 




o 


z 


DO 


Os 




CD 


3 




CD 




r - . 


s] 




s: 


r+ 




\- . 


CO 




I 




CD 


in 






n 


Os 


JO 




I — ' 






H) 




-J 


> 




4 






1— • 


os 


1 


nj 




X 






o 


si 


> 


NJ 




* 






4 


CO 


NJ 


, — x 




Cl 






in 


> 


NJ 


JO 




H- 






rt 


NJ 




CD 




P 






in 


NJ 




< 

10 
CD 
Cu 




3 
O 

3 

CL 

in 






O 
0Q 



O H- 

rt in 

H- O 
O CD 

3 t- 1 
i — i 

-a p 

H- 3 
O CD 
O 



> 
CO C 

CD rt 
4 

< 

r, 

o 

in 



CO 

-r cd 



o 
zr 



po 
CD 
O 
4 
CD 
P 
rt 

o 

3 

CO 
CD 

4 
< 

n 

CD 
in 



3 

hj in 

CD 

in po 
CD 
>3 
P 



i- 1 3 
» CD CD 
O 

n jc c 

P CD 
4 >3 
p P 



-o 

o no 

4 P 

in g 

O -3 

3 in in CD 

P - a 



rt CD 
CD O 



t/1 



CO 
CD 
4 
< 

O 
CD 
in 



C 
in 

H- 

3 
> CD 
in 
to 



CO 
CD 
4 
< 

n 

CD 
in 



C 

r+ 
O 
3 
O 



O- Hj 

H- < 
H H- 

cd n 

CD 
in 



2 CO 

O CD 

rt 4 

CD < 

I— ' l- 1 - 

in o 

- CD 
in 
H 
O 

c 

4 



n 
o 

3 
4 



W K) tO -^1 

in O O 4^ 

K) H W ID 



0-1 

-fc» I— ■ K) 

I— ' O Cn ~-4 



ID I— ' 4^ tsj 

K) oo n h 

VO K) •— ' I— ' 

ff> in |i O 

i— 1 Os Os 00 



ID O OS OS 



in w O 



W -J 



OS 



OOtsJlO^J Isjtsj-^J ID 

P O H (O I— ' 0O O t\J 

IaIIaICaI^J m W h IaI 



I—" Os 

\1 K) O 

00 tsj tsj 

I— ■ in ID 



00 H H 
O ^J I— ' 



CaI O ■£> 



l/J 

00 

o 



|sj 
|sj 



t— ' 






NJ 


-Pi 


tsj 




h- ■ 


ro 


OS 


>—• 


in 


h-' 


Os 


1— ' 


3 


Os 


IaI 


O 


-pi 


00 


1 — i 


i — i 


i — i 


IaI 


-pi 


3 


-~J 


1 — i 


.&>. 


lO 


K> 


ro 


K) 


i — i 


~ 


in 


in 


00 


in 


CO 


tsj 



NJ I— 1 

IaI in -pi 

O I— ' -0 

h- ' O IaI 

IaI IaI Os 

-Pi 4^ O 



tO Jii 4^ 
in m in 



in 3 

O CT 

CD CD 

t— 4 
i— 1 

p: an 

3 

cd n 
o o 

3 3 

in in 

^rt 

Iai4 

s-'C 

O 



-n "3 

3 P 

4 T3 



CO H 



— 
CD 
< 
CD 
4 

3 -C" P 

4 (TO 
CD i— i CD 

d- w 

.en in 



O 

cr 
p 
o 
o 
o 



:r -3 

O 4 

3 O 

CD CL 
3 

-n o 

3 rt 

4 in 
3 



£n in 



D 
H- 
in 
rt 



2 </> 

P 3" 

rt H- 

CD 3 

4 era 

H- in 
P 
t— • 
in 



CD m 

Cu 



o 

o 

3- 

o 



IaI NJ I— ' I— ' 
Ia] NJ O -Pi 

n si o si 



Ia) NJ t— ' I— ' 

I— ' NJ 00 IaI O 

O 00 00 H 4i 



-pi 

Os 



in 
IaI 



I I I 

I— 1 I— > h- ' 

Os IaI NJ in l^i 

O -Pi OS NJ 00 NJ 



t— ' NJ NJ 1— ' NJ t— ' 

-pi in in lO l— i lO O 

Ia) NJ tD in NJ NJ In 

to Os in os in oo Ia) 

4^ C? si ON 4 s . si NJ 

Ia) i— ' si NJ 00 Ia) tO 



si t— ' NJ ►—>►—< 

O 00 NJ Os 00 tO O 

in K) H p OS O tO 

to in Os in Os in oo 

tO Ia) in in Os NJ O 

tO O O 00 si tO Os 



I 

Os Ia) t— ' in NJ in 

NJ 00 si in tO Ia) 4^ 



Sl Sl H 



4^ H -Pi tO si 



T3 

ffl 

i— • pa 
to 
os n 

Ia) CT) 
"s Z 

t- H 
to 

os n 
si rr, 



"a 

m 

i— ■ TO 
tO 

os n 

Ia) m 

-s, Z 

h- H 
to 

os n 
si re 



120- 



co 




o 


► 


c 




4 


T1 


o 


o 


fD 


4 




£ 




n> 


c 


(B 


• 


s* 1 


CO 


H- 


• 


3 




O 


00 


i— 1 


c 


C 


4 


P- 


n> 


H- 


P 


3 


c 


OP 


o 


2 


Hi 


P 




4 


r+ 


n 


sr 


3- 


a> 






i— ' 


n 


ts) 


n> 


>» 


3 




en 


1 — ' 


C 


•■S3 


w 


ON 


" 


-J 


n 




0) 




3 




(/) 




C 




t/> 




o 




Hi 




DO 




c 




(/) 




H- 




3 




fD 




(/) 




0) 




1— ' 




to 




ON 




si 




po 




CD 





H 
4 

P 

CD 



2 

P 
4 

►— ■ 
P 
3 
O- 



DO 

n 



ON 

si 



Is) 
ts) 



73 
CD 
< 

n> 



S! 


- 


5 


H 


CO CO /O 


T3 2 


7s 


X 


ri: 


G"5 


Ti 


O 


n 


n 


n 


n 


n 


CO 


DO 


> > 


2 


CO T3 


o 


H- 


p 


P 


O rt 


C 


4 O 


CD 


o 


p 


p 


4 


o 


3' 


(D 


p 


p 


p 


p 


P 


3 H^ 


P 


G O 


4 


O 


(/) 


t— > 


3 • 


(5 


H- 3 


3 


z 


4 


4 


CD 


4 


P 


O 


4 


4 


»— ■ 


1 — 1 


I— • 


3 t- 


4 


DO t— 


o 


o 


J 


cr 


a> 


O 


3 r+ 


r+ 


p 


Hi 


4 


o- 


o 


4 


H- 


4 


O 


< 


<-t 


<H 


fD fD 


*< 


a n 


o 


3 


H- 


o 


4 s: 


- 


O TO 




4 


O 


CD 


n> 


3 J 


i — i 


I— i 


o 


h- 1 


fD 


H- 


H- 


OQ 


i— 1 


HH H 


U) 


H- 


3 


r+ 


(/i p 




fD O 




fo- 


4 


r+ 


4 


n> 


CD 




i — i 


H- 


4 


3 


3 


> P 


P 


< H-l 


c+ 


n 


OQ 




n> 4 


> 


3 






a. 


r+ 


H- 


in 


(/) 




i—" 


3 


H 


o 


O 


23 


3 


i-i n 


O 


o 


r+ 




rt *< 


3 


(75 CD 










n 


r+ 








CD 




4 


4 


O- 


co > 


4 




O 

3 




in 


3 
CD 

t/i 


ry 
eorge' 










?r 


a> 

4 












H) 


fD 

n 

r+ 


3 
P- 

fD 
l— 1 




o 
z 



W si H 



Is) 

en 



^ *■ 00 W IS) CM I— ' 4^ O 
OOOOnoo i— ' O On CM en 

O (O IB K) OO 00 Ul O K) 



I— ' IS) ON I— ' ON 
(O vj o ifl 00 
00 Ul P si (D 



IS) CM -P* ON IS) 

Si ^ H H O 

t— ' 00 en Cm ON 





i — i 


i — i 










lO 


co 


4^ 


l— 1 


si 


en 


i— ' 


On 


I — i 


O 


si 


<o 


W 


Is) 


O 


si 


O 


si 


ON 


0-1 


3 


oo 


O 


t— ' 


1 — 1 


o 


IsJ 


J> 


O-J 


si 


CO 


s] 


IS) 


s] 


tO 


W 


ON 


cm 


4> 


O 


to 


en 


I— 1 


O-J 


On 


O-J 


h- 1 



Is) -P* ts) IS) ts) W O Ol 00 W 

O tn M si J> ^ H si 00 W 



t— ' 4^. to on 00 O 
On i— ' On •£» ts) O 
IS) ON CM t£> si to 



I— ' Cn 

00 Ul J> H 00 

H W W O M O 

to o to 00 to -P> 



Is) ts) CM O s] sj si M s! si 
On -pa. ts) O On O On O O K- > 
to I— ' IS5 ON t— ' O W 0O ■P' 4> 



en o O 00 to 

t— ' 00 O s] 00 
i— 1 i— 1 On 4^- to 



en 

00 

rs) 



















































H- 1 


z 


















1— I 


\—' 
























Is) 


en 


h- ' 




si 


c 


















- 


v. 
























V* 


v. 


« 




.» 


2 




0-J 


w 


ON 


I—" 


t— ' 


ISJ 




co 


4^ 


I— 1 


1 — 1 


4^ 


1 — 1 


-P* 


I— 1 


to 


K) 


O-J 


(— ' 


t— ' 


J> 


on 


t-J 


en 


en 


DO 




3 


to 


1 — 1 


to 


IS) 


I—" 


<o 


on 


si 


Is) 


si 


-P=> 


to 


to 


ON 


On 


si 


■u 


I— 1 


1— ' 


ON 


i — i 


4> 


en 


ts) 


m 




ON 


to 

I— » 


4- 
1— » 


ON 


CO 


O 


to 


s] 

co 


Is) 

00 


to 


ts) 


si 

I— 1 


O-J 


I— 1 


Is) 


to 


to 


co 


I— 1 


s] 


4- 
CO 


co 


si 

O-J 


OKI 

H- 1 


-Pi 

-se- 
en 

ON 


73 


m 


4^ 


1 — 1 


ON 


-p* 


I— 1 


4^ 


i — i 


to 


ON 


Is) 


-pa. 


t— ' 


ts) 


(— ' 


Ui 


on 


On 


co 


Is) 


1 — ' 


o 


si 


to 


ts) 


o 


■oe 


CO CO 


ON 


o 


on 


sj 


4^ 


s] 


on 


to 


o 


4^ 


to 


si 


On 


to 


t— ' 


to 


O-J 


i— ■ 


t— ' 


00 


I— 1 


to 


oo 


Is) 


ON 


I— 1 


> H 


4- 


Is) 


co 


ON 


00 


si 


OJ 


0-J 


ON 


en 


ON 


I— 1 


4- 


ts) 


&> 


4- 


O-J 


to 


4^ 


4^ 


0-J 


to 


o 


to 


to 


o 


m do 


tsj 


t— ' 


o 


to 


ON 


4- 


to 


CM 


si 


si 


O-J 


CM 


CO 


4^ 


to 


ON 


ts) 


Ol 


IsJ 


en 


On 


ON 


on 


en 


en 


o 


co r- 1 


i — i 


en 

1 — 1 


On 

i — i 


ts) 


00 


CO 


CO 


ON 

1— ' 

o 


00 

I—" 

o 


CM 


si 


IS) 

1— « 


en 


si 

1 — 1 


I— 1 


<?■ 


o 


to 


00 


-pi 


to 

to 


o 

to 

o 


to 

-Pa. 


to 

I— 1 


ON 

-fee- 
si 

o 


o 

m 
z 

H 
1— 1 


i— i 

CO 

•x. 
2 
tn 
z 

H 

CO 
> S 


en 


CM 


to 


on 


1— ' 


<s\ 


1— ' 


ON 


w 


Is) 


en 


Is) 


K) 


CM 


CM 


s] 


on 


CO 


1— • 


I— 1 


si 


si 


CO 


■Pa. 


o 


73 




o 


a 


to 


si 


OnI 


4- 


On 


en 


00 


en 


0-J 


00 


CO 


oo 


CO 


O-l 


O-J 


CO 


00 


to 


ON 


ON 


CO 


1—. 


ON 




O I 


CO 


ON 


-p*. 


si 


si 


c 


4-* 


i— 1 


CM 


en 


O-J 


si 


o 


00 


00 


on 


si 


o 


s] 


si 


s] 


to 


si 


I— 1 


en 


►< 


r- 1 


ON 


OJ 


w 


J*- 


ts) 


CO 


ON 


en 


si 


to 


o 


s] 


si 


ts) 


4^ 


ON 


CO 


ts) 


O-J 


si 


O 


o 


O-J 


CO 


o 


m 
> 

73 


PAYROL 
L 



ts) ts) 

ON -&> 



t— ■ en is) 4i> 

W O si W 

ON Si 00 IS) 



CM On 4> O-J CrJ 

tO H 00 H si 

to ON en On o 



s! A W si s] 
(/l W 4^ CN W 
*>h4s.O W 



O i— ' en o-l en 

to 4a O W OO 
O CO CM O Is) 













t—' 


m 


na 




ts) 


On 


I—" 




00 


2 


> 




s] 


ON 


to 


CM 


CM 


*3 
t- 1 


1— 1 

o 


on 


l—> 


O-J 


CO 


to 


en 


O 




o> 


on 


to 


4- 


ON 


en 


►< 




o 


10 


ts) 


ON 


1— " 


Is) 


m 
m 

CO 





/-> co 

H> > 2 

- c- m 

o m z 

o co h 

o co 



-121- 



NO. 94 



MARYLAND RETAIL TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1963 



" 




ALL ESTABLISHMENTS 


] 


ESTABLISHMENTS WITH PAYROLL 


















PAYROLL 




NUMBER 


SALES 


NUMBER 


SALES 


ENTIRE YEAR 


PAID f 
EMPLOYEES 1 


POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 






($1,000) 






($1,000) 


($1,000) 


Maryland 


23 


,901 


$4,237,061 


17 


,795 


$4,105,709 


$ 503,698 


157,289 


Allegany 




869 


114,241 




639 


109,671 


12,537 


4,132 


Anne Arundel 


1 


,398 


267,644 


1 


,086 


259,974 


32,096 


10,001 


Baltimore City 


8 


,661 


1,316,945 


6 


,291 


1,268,191 


176,280 


57,193 


Baltimore 


2 


,800 


577,992 


2 


,218 


565,150 


67,566 


22,562 


Calvert 




136 


14,425 




102 


13,449 


1,392 


470 


Caroline 




243 


19,822 




141 


17,692 


1,736 


576 


Carroll 




588 


64,482 




348 


59,640 


6,317 


1,989 


Cecil 




399 


44,622 




299 


42,678 


4,238 


1,390 


Charles 




320 


46,859 




264 


45,435 


5,571 


1,887 


Dorchester 




268 


30,501 




172 


27,715 


3,087 


908 


Frederick 




673 


92,751 




515 


88,523 


9,911 


3,169 


Garrett 




209 


20,736 




125 


19,232 


1,987 


672 


Harford 




591 


87,510 




423 


83,754 


8,945 


2,669 


Howard 




272 


38,584 




190 


36,530 


4,005 


1,208 


Kent 




202 


22,521 




140 


21,101 


2,060 


648 


Montgomery 


1 


,631 


583,464 


1 


,343 


578,810 


67,610 


17,880 


Prince George's 


1 


,805 


512,221 


1 


,541 


506,661 


58,694 


17,545 


Queen Anne's 




170 


15,199 




104 


13,627 


1,331 


431 


St. Mary's 




335 


37,956 




227 


35,720 


3,788 


1,171 


Somerset 




256 


19,862 




142 


17,146 


1,322 


479 


Talbot 




280 


53,300 




204 


51,636 


4,948 


1,360 


Washington 




893 


129,659 




637 


123,877 


15,029 


4,756 


Wicomico 




493 


83,454 




333 


79,366 


9,130 


2,769 


Worcester 




409 


42,311 




311 


40,131 


4,118 


1,424 



(1) 



For week including November 15, 1963. It should be noted that the paid employees for 
1967 represent statistics for the week including March 12, 1967. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Business, 1963, "Retail Trade: Maryland," 
BC 63-RA22. 



122- 



NO. 95 



MARYLAND WHOLESALE TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1967 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER 
OF 

ESTABLISHMENTS 



SALES 
($1,000) 



PAYROLL ENTIRE 

YEAR 

($1,000) 



PAID 
EMPLOYEES 



CD 



Maryland 


3,943 


$5,957,830 


$338,410 


Allegany 


107 


55,799 


3,860 


Anne Arundel 


120 


288,851 


10,716 


Baltimore City 


1,700 


2,823,661 


171,274 


Baltimore 


441 


897,924 


43,492 


Calvert 


5 


2,203 


203 


Caroline 


28 


33,223 


1,020 


Carroll 


47 


31,409 


2,040 


Cecil 


24 


13,036 


932 


Charles 


37 


41,928 


2,350 


Dorchester 


42 


23,963 


1,255 


Frederick 


71 


61,259 


4,874 


Garrett 


22 


10,017 


526 


Harford 


43 


24,556 


1,739 


Howard 


33 


40,191 


1,817 


Kent 


22 


9,485 


614 


Montgomery 


400 


738,393 


27,467 


Prince George's 


348 


558,707 


38,947 


Queen Anne's 


20 


9,716 


1,003 


St. Mary's 


17 


10,978 


1,129 


Somerset 


33 


15,391 


1,381 


Talbot 


54 


32,862 


1,998 


Washington 


151 


102,515 


9,998 


Wicomico 


137 


110,924 


8,273 


Worcester 


41 


20,839 


1,502 



50,889 

701 

1,589 

25,484 

5,935 

53 

203 
400 
198 
425 
312 

822 
130 
313 
311 
120 

3,832 

5,634 

200 

184 

326 

405 
1,517 
1,469 

326 






(1) 



For week including March 12, 1967 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Census of Business, 1967, Wholesale Trade: 
Maryland," BC 67-WA22, Table 4, p. 22-8. 



123- 



NO. 96 



MARYLAND WHOLESALE TRADE, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1963 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER OF 
ESTABLISHMENTS 



SALES 
($1,000) 



PAYROLL 
ENTIRE YEAR 
($1,000) 



PAID 

EMPLOYEES 



(] 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



,658 


$ 4,473,736 


$ 248,208 


44,104 


117 


48,705 


3,312 


717 


89 


64,663 


5,588 


1,014 


,906 


2,682,029 


155,692 


26,629 


271 


361,612 


22,552 


3,430 


7 


2,901 


188 


70 


29 


23,774 


913 


232 


44 


19,701 


1,276 


294 


30 


16,536 


986 


215 


29 


33,162 


1,526 


289 


43 


23,929 


977 


364 


70 


40,579 


3,455 


730 


20 


6,636 


371 


106 


46 


33,755 


1,762 


392 


23 


21,925 


1,790 


328 


24 


9,910 


643 


187 


254 


433,713 


13,072 


2,025 


231 


387,962 


16,089 


2,891 


23 


12,799 


688 


237 


18 


11,318 


828 


170 


31 


7,789 


702 


35 8 


43 


19,889 


1,242 


307 


142 


97,179 


7,444 


1,539 


127 


98,326 


6,118 


1,327 


41 


14,944 


994 


253 



(1) 



For week including November 15, 1963. It should be noted that the paid employees 
for 1967 represent statistics for the week including March 12, 1967. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Business, 1963, "Wholesale Trade 
Maryland," BC 63-WA22. 



124- 



co 


, — ^ 




o 


X) 


1- 


c 


> — ' 




4 


Tl 


SD l-H 


o 


O 


C 3 


CD 


4 


r+ O 




£ 


C 




0) 


cn Cu 


C 


a> 


fD CD 




^ 


4 


co 


H- 


H- O 


• 


3 


O (-*■ 




o 


ro a> 


CO 


1 — 1 


(/) t— ' 


C 


C 


to 


4 


cu 


X 


CD 


H- 


era 


P 


3 


P 3 


c 


era 


4 O 
p r+ 


o 


2 


era a) 


Ml 


P 


fD p— ' 




4 


(/) in 


rt 


o 


* . \# 


tr 


■pr 




a> 




2: rt 




i — i 


M- O 


n 


X) 


(/) c 


n> 


« 


O 4 


3 




fD H- 


</) 


h- ' 


p— > (/) 


C 


<o 


(-■ c+ 


w 


ON 


SB 


" 


-J 


3 O 
fD O 


n 




O C 


n> 




C 4 


3 




W r+ 


(/> 




in 


C 




4 - 


i/i 




fD 
T3 O 


o 




03 03 


i-h 




H- 3 

4 *d 


CO 




in 


c 




in »■ 


(/I 




CD 


H- 




4 *T3 


3 




<; cd 


fD 




H- 4 


(/) 




O in 


(/> 




fD O 


* 




in 3 


t— ' 




1 — i 


<D 




•? 


On 




O in 


si 




r+ fD 


"• 




H- 4 

O < 


— 




3 H- 


CO 




O 


CD 




►d fD 


1— ' 




H- >•■ 


(T> 




o 


O 




r+ 2 


r+ 




C H- 


n> 




4 to 


CL 




fD O 

in fD 


(/I 




>. . t—1 


fD 




p— • 


4 




O 03 


< 




rt 3 


H- 




3" fD 


o 




fD O 


a> 




4 c 


w 




V) 

p 
3 a- 

C C 


s: 




i/5 to 


tu 




fD H- 


4 




3 3 


*s 




fD fD 


t— ■ 




3 to 


03 




r+ to 


3 






CL 




t-j in 


* 




fD fD 


■■ 




O 4 
4 < 

fD H- 


DO 




p O 


n 




rt fD 
H- to 


ON 




o »• 


si 




3 
> 


CO 




to C 


> 




fD 4- 
4 O 


X) 




< 


X) 




H- fj 


«• 




O CD 

fD T3 


H 




to ft} 


P3 




H- 


cr 




4 


»— ■ 




w 



fD 
CM 



s: 


S 


s: 


H 


CO CO XD 


T3 


2 


7s 


I 


X 


a 


T1 


o 


n 


n 


n 


n 


n 


CD 


CO 


> > 


s 


CO 13 


o 


H- 


p 


P 


O rf 


C 


4 


O 


fD 


O 


p 


p 


4 


o 


3^ 


CD 


p 


p 


p 


fu 


P3 


3 i— 


p 


c o 


4 


n 


m 


p— • 


3 • 


o 


H. 


3 


3 


s 


4 


^ 


fD 


4 


P 


O 


4 


4 


i—" 


1 — 1 


i — i 


3 t- 


4 


do r -1 


o 


o 


:r 


cr 


fD 


o 


3 


r+ 


r+ 


p 


i-h 


^ 


Cu 


o 


4 


H- 


4 


O 


<: 


r-t- 


r+ 


fD fD 


X 


a i-i 


fD 


3 


H- 


o 


4 2 


3 


r. 


era 




4 


O 


o 


fD 


3^ 


l—" 


1— ' 


o 


t— ' 


fD 


H' 


H- 


era 


►— ' 


HH H 


t/1 


H- 


3 


r+ 


(/) &3 




fD 


o 




Cu 


4 


r+ 


4 


fD 


fD 




(— ' 


H- 


4 


3 


3 


> p 


P 


< t-H 


rt 


o 


era 




fD 4 


> 




3 






Cu 


rt 


H- 


W 


W 




t— ' 


3 


r-f 


O 


O 


4 3 


3 


h-i n 


n> 


o 


r+ 




rt X 


3 


CI 


fD 










O 


r+ 








fD 




4 


4 


C X 


Cu 


CO > 


4 




o 

3 




W 


3 
fD 

t/l 


fD 
O 
4 
TO 
fD 


4 










?r 


fD 
4 












0) 


fD 
O 


3 
Cu 
fD 
i— 1 




»-h r^ 
o 



w W in h 

K) --J *. ^O 

Ul U W vj 



00 4^ ON 
*» 00 W 



i— i oo 



-^. O -t^ cn 

On ON Cn 4^. 

U3 00 4^ On 

W K) cn O 



t— ' K) 

-f^ p-i o ^> 

00 4^ (— ' U3 -vj 

K) Cn 00 <£> O 

On Cn VD 4^ en 



NJ P— ' IX) 
O cn i— ' ^J 

4^ i— ' cn on 



00 O 
IX) ON IX) 00 X) 
Cn KD Cn 



O X) 



W CD X) 4*. 

CO l— 1 On 00 

*> ID W si 

P— ' P— ' ^J CfJ 



■t» 00 O H 

si io w in 
CM Cn p— ■ p— ■ 



CM CM W i— 1 

-0^ O CO 00 

Cn 4^ CO O 

00 I— • CM 4^- 



4i. X) 

p— ' (O CO 

t— i i — i X) ON Cn 

X) CO -fc>. 00 CM 

cn oo <0 X) CO 



cn oo i— • cn 
cn cm cn x> 
O X) 00 Cn 



O si 

-&>. OX) 
4^. P— ' CO CM O 
si O ON P— ' CM 



X) Cn 



ON 



O UD 
sj On 



4^. P-- 4i> 
O X) O 
4s. CM ON 



p— ' p— ' X) CM P— ' l— ' p— > CO 4=» CO 
s] on CaI Cn p— ' 00 cn X) i— 'CM X) 

OONX)CDON ID O H h si CM 



X) O X) X) o 

O CM <£) CM 4s- 

ON O 00 4s- 4^ 

00 CM s] X) On 





4^ 


p— ' 




ID ON *» 


4^ 


X) CO cn si i— ■ 


CaI h si 4i» CO 


CM 



si 4^ >— ' •— ' On 
X) 00 4^ s] cn 

AO w <o w 



4^ 00 si 4^ 4^ 
CD X) si 00 CO 



Cn 00 <£) P— » CM 
O CM O X) ON 



P— ' X) 

X) ON 
CM P— ' CM 00 I— 1 CO 



t— ' P— '00 X) 00 4^- cn P— ■ 



slCMOCOiO I— ' CD O CM p— ■ 
p— ' s] ON t— ' O OOOOCnO 
COs]00<OCn X)CMsl00sl 



X) -ts. X) 

Cn 4^ i— 1 On On 

On Cn O O Cn 

CM O si ON si 



On CM p— ' si Cm 
Cn O <D> 00 cn 
On 4^ si 4^ P— » 



I— ■ Cn O P— ' 
CD CM O si 
CM On to o 



CO 
GO 



X) ON X) 4^ P— ' 
P— ' s] ON l— • X) 

W h in m in 



in ON X) s] CD co 
O P— ' X) 00 4*. 4^> 
ON X) 4^. 4^ 4i» CM 



X) 



si 



CO 4^- CM X) Cn 
CM 4i» CM 00 P— • Cn 

P— ' ON ON ON O X) 



4> 

00 4^ 4^ 
i— ■ io I— ' 



O 
si 
Cn 



p— ■ 4i» O p— ' si cn 

CM O 00 O O ON 
00 CO si ON ON CM 



I— 1 CM 

X) I— ' P— ' si 
CD s) CM CM 4^ 



00 P— ' 

cn si 

00 o 



cn CO O CM 
H O «3 O 
On On in CO 



X) 
si s] W 



s] 

4S> 



I— ' O 00 P— ' CO CM 
si On O Cn X) CO 
ID 00 W 4i *. Cn 



tt ro w 
^ n x 

° h tn 

S ^ z 

^-^ co co 



^ n 
S h 

v -' co 



m 



CD 
si 



-125- 



NO. 98 



MARYLAND SELECTED SERVICES, 



(1) 



BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1963 



ALL ESTABLISHMENTS 



ESTABLISHMENTS WITH PAYROLL 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 











PAYROLL 




RECEIPTS 




RECEIPTS 


ENTIRE YEAR 


NUMBER 


($1,000) 


NUMBER 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


13,840 


$705,999 


6,978 


$665,785 


$215,035 


426 


9,805 


220 


8,919 


2,291 


781 


35,309 


385 


33,041 


9,599 


5,000 


296,201 


2,634 


283,805 


81,353 


1,529 


56,289 


767 


51,371 


17,021 


70 


3,162 


28 


2,878 


737 


125 


1,950 


37 


1,462 


441 


238 


3,907 


90 


2,991 


756 


206 


3,511 


76 


2,633 


630 


155 


8,119 


81 


7,699 


1,685 


164 


3,413 


54 


2,827 


853 


328 


7,711 


148 


6,333 


1,653 


77 


1,586 


39 


1,398 


268 


304 


7,569 


140 


6,557 


2,242 


148 


4,796 


74 


4,048 


961 


84 


2,120 


38 


1,774 


560 


1,444 


140,618 


784 


136,228 


61,799 


1,175 


62,567 


657 


59,463 


19,777 


59 


1,579 


29 


1,423 


263 


119 


3,332 


53 


3,002 


877 


87 


855 


17 


423 


101 


151 


3,479 


69 


3,083 


1,001 


505 


13,269 


223 


11,763 


3,198 


360 


9,318 


148 


8,038 


2,103 


305 


11,158 


187 


10,250 


2,428 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



(1) 



Includes Hotels, Motels, Tourist Courts, Camps; Personal Services; Miscellaneous 
Business Services; Auto Repair, Auto Services, Garages; Miscellaneous Repair Shops; 
Motion Pictures; Other Amusement, Recreation Services. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, Census of Business, 1963, "Selected Services: 
Maryland," BC 63-SA22. 



126- 



co 

o 

c 

o 

CD 






CD 

c 

0) 

P 

c 
o 

H> 

r+ 

cd 
n 

CD 
3 
(/) 
C 
in 



o 
n> 

3 
(/) 

C 

!/) 

o 
t-t) 

CO 

C 
w 

CD 
(/) 
(A 



sO 
On 



co 

CD 
I— ' 
CD 
O 
r+ 
CD 
CL 

CO 
CD 

< 

t->- 

o 

CD 



P 
4 

»— • 
P 

3 



CO 

n 

On 

-J 
I 

CO 

> 

tsj 
IsJ 



H 

P 

cr 

CD 
CM 



=5 H 

P P 

(/l H- ' 

=r cr 

h- o 

3 r+ 
r+ 

o 

3 



CO CO o "O _ 

o <-t c »-j o 

3 • CD 
CD CD 

4 2 3 
C/> p 

CD 4 > 

r+ X 3 

- 3 

C/> CD 



3 
3 r* 
O OQ 
CD O 



a cd 

CD i-j 
O v; 

- 4 

W OQ 
CD 

I/) 



t> i a: o -n 

CD O P P »-J 

3 S i-i 4 CD 

r+ pi Mi hj a 

i-J O CD CD 

PL r+ H- 
O 



o o n n n 

O 3" cd fa P 

4 fa o 4 4 

O l-j H- Hj O 

3" i— • i— ' O I— ' 

CD CD 



a co co > > 

fa fa fa 3 i—" 

h— 1 i— • t— • 3 *— ' 

< r+ rt CD CD 



in w 



t— 3 
CD 



0Q 

3 3 > P 
O O H 3 

4 4 C X 
CD CD 3 

PL 

n cd 



2 

P 

P 
3 

a. 



ts) M N) 
O ^J On CO 



t— • en 41 

On On 41 00 tsj 



I— ' tsj CM tsj IsJ 
CM t— ' en cm en 



tsj tsj I-* 

|NJ M ON -t» 



sj 

n] O W W O 
M 00 (O H H- • 



s] On 41 00 

I? WOW 



-J s] 

CM CTn CM Cn CJn 

-J On t— ' CO s] 



CM Cn ON 41 00 

sO n£> en en O 



eO 41 CO On On 
o co cm o ro 



tsj s) 

ID Cn W N) tNj 

41 ID t/i H 00 

t-< tsj 4i -J en 



W On nJ w 
CM O O Cn 



CM 00 
I—" ON.fi. H W Ul H Ji 

W Ul *» -^ O -J00OOK) 



On 





Jl » H 


IsJ tsj 41 


ISJ CO On CM 


O CM 41 On 


00 co tsj -pi. vO 



i— i *> sj tg i — > i — ■ oocn t— ' tsj en tsj en 

■sj U3 ON I- ' O ON 00 On i— ' K) si W O O 



InJ M W J/i K) 
tsj <£> On t— ■ tsj 



i— ' en 

^D (D (D tn 
-JUiO ID 



s] 
-J 



IsJ tsj 

•— ' en cjn cm >— ' >— ' oj h i— ■ to yi >- -en 

00 W 41 NJ U1 ^1 sj ^D Jl W O si H N) 



tSj 

o 



IC 



41 ai h 

O 00 ON 



rs) en i— ' 

w 41 H W -ti 
O ON en en CM 



I— 1 

CM 



ON ISJ ON CM H- CM 



CM ISJ 

t— ' en 



ISJ ON 

H Is) (O sj 



3^ 



tNj 

o 

CM 



ISJ ISJ 

en CM On i— • i— 'i— • sj 41 

en o i— 'On isjenoooo4i 







tsj 


4> 


1— 1 




I— ' CM 41 i— ' en 


t— • cm rsj tsj 


»— ' en 


O 


ISJ 


41 


IsJ O O CM 41 


(O ON to vO sj 


00 o 


o 


to 


IsJ 



oo 



co 73 




cr o 




co tn 




a hh 




t-i H 




< >-> 




t-H O 




CO > 




l-H C- 




o 




z 




n H 


X 


^ ° 


o 


2 C 


H 


-a pa 


m 


CO HH 


c— 


co 


CO 


H 


- 


n 


s: 


o 


o 


c 


H 


TO 


m 


H 


c 


CO 


CO 


" 


* 


CO T3 




m m 




73 73 




< co 




t-i o 




n z 




m > 




r- 1 




CO CO 


2 


m c 


hH 


30 CO 


CO 


< i-h 


n 


HH z 


m 


o m 


t— 


m co 


t— 


CO 


> 




z 




m 




o 




c 




CO 


CD > 


> 


> c 


C 


73 H 


H 


> O 


O 


CD 




m co 


73 


co m 


CTI 


73 


•n 


< 


> 


(-H 


i — i 


n 


73 


m 


- 


■* 




co pa 


2 


m m 


1 — 1 


73 "O 


CO 


< > 


n 


HH 1— 1 


m 


n 73 


t— 


m 


r- 




> 




z 




tn 




o 




c 




CO 


T3 2 




HH O 




O H 




H H-( 




C O 




73 Z 




m 




CO 




CO 73 


^ o 


m m 


2 H 


73 o 


c rc 


< 73 


co tn 


i— i m 


m 73 


n > 


^ 


m H 


tn 


i — i 


z 


o 


H 


z 





CO 

-< 



T3 
O 



n 
> 
t— 



z 

o 



sO 

sO 



CO 

tn 
73 

o 

n 

tn 

CO 

H 

> 

CO 

tr- 

H- 1 

CO 



tn 
z 

H 

CO 



CO 



?s 



CO 


o 


c 




CO 


o 


o 


■n 



< CO 

t-i C 
CO CO 

HH I— I 

o z 
z tn 

CO 
CO 

<-^ o 

vO 73 

On O 

sj CZ 

73 



> 

73 

> 
z 

o 

CO 

tn 
t— 
tn 
n 

H 
tn 
o 

CO 

m 

73 

< 
i— i 
n 

tn 
co 



127- 



NO. 100 NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS, BY KIND OF BUSINESS GROUP, MARYLAND SELECTED 

SERVICES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1963 







HOTELS, 






AUTO 










MOTELS, 




MISCEL- 


REPAIR, 


MISCEL- 




OTHER 




TOURIST 




LANEOUS 


AUTO 


LANEOUS 




AMUSEMEN' 


POLITICAL 


COURTS, 


PERSONAL 


BUSINESS 


SERVICES, 


REPAIR 


MOTION 


RECREATK 


SUBDIVISION 


CAMPS 


SERVICES 


SERVICES 


GARAGES 


SERVICES 


PICTURES 


SERVICES 


Maryland 


629 


6,225 


1,781 


1,749 


1,903 


201 


1,352 


Allegany 


31 


226 


31 


52 


52 


5 


29 


Anne Arundel 


40 


319 


98 


94 


124 


8 


98 


Baltimore City 


64 


2,642 


712 


657 


526 


80 


319 


Baltimore 


51 


623 


199 


185 


250 


17 


204 


Calvert 


9 


12 


3 


10 


9 





27 


Caroline 





53 


11 


23 


26 


2 


10 


Carroll 


12 


108 


18 


34 


44 


4 


18 


Cecil 


24 


71 


12 


42 


32 


1 


24 


Charles 


22 


51 


11 


23 


15 


1 


32 


Dorchester 


3 


94 


13 


20 


21 


1 


12 


Frederick 


30 


137 


17 


48 


65 


5 


26 


Garrett 


21 


29 


1 


13 


2 


1 


10 


Harford 


29 


130 


24 


44 


43 


7 


27 


Howard 


26 


37 


19 


19 


27 


1 


19 


Kent 


12 


32 


1 


8 


16 


1 


14 


Montgomery 


25 


552 


353 


137 


203 


18 


156 


Prince George's 


39 


498 


142 


140 


188 


25 


143 


Queen Anne's 


8 


23 


2 


11 


9 





6 


St . Mary ' s 


14 


41 


4 


18 


23 


3 


16 


Somerset 


3 


42 


2 


17 


14 


1 


8 


Talbot 


8 


62 


21 


20 


27 


2 


11 


Washington 


33 


213 


41 


75 


78 


6 


59 


Wicomico 


15 


154 


37 


44 


86 


6 


18 


Worcester 


110 


76 


9 


15 


23 


6 


66 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, 
Maryland," BC 63-SA22. 



Census of Business, 1963, "Selected Services: 



128- 



PERSONAL INCOME 

Maryland's personal income rose in 1968 to $14,048,000,000, an increase 
of nearly 93 per cent from 1960. This percentage increase far outdistanced the 
increases for all of the other mid-east states. The total personal income of 
the State represents 2.05 per cent of the total personal income of the United 
States, up from 1.82 per cent in 1960. 

Per capita income in Maryland rose to $3,742 in 1968, up 59.6 per cent 
from 1960. This figure placed the State tenth in the nation in this category. 

In average per household disposable income, Maryland led all of the mid- 
east states with a level of $11,001 in 1968. As might be expected the metro- 
politan areas were the leaders, with suburban Washington's Montgomery County 
having the highest average disposable income of any county in the United 

n 

States. Baltimore, Howard, Anne Arundel, and Prince George's Counties each 
have disposable income figures in excess of $12,000 per household, while at 

the other end of the scale, Garrett, Somerset, Worcester, Caroline, and Dor- 

J 

Chester Counties all have levels of approximately $6,500 or less. 

As this publication was in the final stages of preparation, personal in- 

i 

come figures for 1969 became available from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Office 
of Business Economics. The total personal income for the State was $15,416,000,000 
in 1969, a figure that is 2.07 per cent of the total personal income of the United 
States ($742,961,000,000). 

This total personal income represents a 9.7 per cent gain for the State 
over the corresponding 1968 statistic. Maryland ranks fourteenth in the Nation 
in total personal income for 1969. 

Per capita income for 1969 rose to $4,095, up 9.4 per cent from 1968, 
placing Maryland tenth in the Nation. The per capita income for the United States 
in 1969 was $3,680. Thus, Maryland per capita income stood 11.3 per cent above 
that of the United States as a whole. 



-129- 



NO. 101 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN STATES 

1968 AND 1960 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME 



STATE 



1968 
($1,000,000) 



1960 
($1,000,000) 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



United States 

Mideast 
Maryland 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 
District of 
Columbia 

Southeast 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 
Mississippi 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 

Maryland as Per 
Cent of U. S. 



683,702 



14,048 
75,049 
28,047 
40,102 
2,026 

3,580 



14,100 
4,451 

13,642 
6,341 

12,705 

19,626 
4,878 
8,516 

10,252 
8,316 



2.05 



398,725 



7,289 
46,281 
16,528 
25,395 

1,238 

2,311 



7,339 
2,957 
7,142 
3,298 
6,489 
9,746 
2,632 
4,792 
5,521 
4,876 



1.82 



71.5 



92.7 
62.2 
69.7 
57.9 
63.7 



54.9 



92.1 

50.5 
91.0 
92.3 
95.8 
101.4 
85. 
77 
85 
70 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, "Survey of 
Current Business," August, 1969, Vol. 49, No. 8, p. 14. 

Note: State Personal Income received by State residents from all sources during 

any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received by federal military 
and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad. 



130- 



NO. 102 



PER CAPITA INCOME, MARYLAND AND SELECTED EASTERN 
STATES: 1968 AND 1960 







PER CAPITA INCOME 


PER CENT 


RANK IN NATION 




1968 1960 


CHANGE 


BASED ON 1968 


STATE 


($) ($) 


1960/1968 


INCOME 



United States 



$3,421 



$2,215 



54.4 



Mideast 
Maryland 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 
District of Columbia 

Southeast 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 
Mississippi 
Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 

Maryland as Per Cent of U. S, 



3,742 


2,343 


59.7 


10 


4,151 


2,746 


51.2 


2 


3,954 


2,708 


46.0 


7 


3,419 


2,242 


52.5 


17 


3,795 


2,757 


37.6 


8 


4,425 


3,017 


46.7 


1 


3,068 


1,841 


66.6 


29 


2,470 


1,594 


55.0 


46 


2,664 


1,561 


70.7 


43 


2,380 


1,377 


72.8 


47 


2,781 


1,639 


69.7 


39 


3,191 


1,950 


63.6 


28 


2,081 


1,205 


72.7 


50 


2,645 


1,574 


68.0 


44 


2,579 


1,543 


67.1 


45 


2,337 


1,488 


57.1 


48 



109.4 



105.8 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics "Survey of 
Current Business," August, 1969, Vol. 49, No. 8, p. 15. 



Vote: 



State Personal Income is income received by State residents from all sources 
during any calendar year. Excludes wages and salaries received by federal 
military and civilian employees temporarily stationed abroad. 



-131- 



o 

vO 

en 



00 
vO 
Cn 



Q 



OS 

< 



tu 
u 
oi 

o 
co 

oi 
o 
•"3 
< 



CQ 

UJ 

o 



-J 
< 

2 

O 

co 

as 
tu 
a. 



to 

o 



UJ 
























cj 
























I 00 
























U vO 


r^ 


i— i Cn N h \C 


00 


O rH 


o 


o lo o 


1—1 


LO \o to 


o 


en 


LO 


en 


• 


. . u • • • 


• 


















H -i 


cm 


^o h z oo o r-~ 


h- 


[^ 00 


en 


t \£> o 


o 


oi cn in 


"«t 


CN 


^r 


2 \ 


Oi 


cn f f-~ LO CJ> 


a> 


LO Tt 


to 


o lo oo 


I— 1 


f i— i lo 


cn 


to 


LO 



m o 

en 
a: — i 

UJ 

Oh 



— 



tu 
U 

OS UU 
UJ O 
O-, 

CO 
< 





o 






o 


en 


o 


o 


00 


-G 


•V 


0*4 


en 


o 


* 


i— i 


o 


f- 




o 


■&e- 



E- 

UJ 

u 

oi a. 
uj o 
a, 

CO 

< 



UJ 



o 
o 

00 o 
\£) - 

en o 

i-H o 

o 



o 
o 



CM rfr CN1 vO IO to i— I 

to rt en i— i to 



■— i vo vo ^ to r- 1 oo cnrsit~^ en en 

^O N O to vO CM 00 i— l t — i — I LO 



CM 



vD i— I tO 00 00 to 
tO tO ■— I tO O CM 
tO tO ^J" 00 



00 


"3- LO 


vO 


i-H o o 


r-^ 


vo i^ en 


00 


CM 


o 


CM 


"3- LO 


r^ 


LO vO i— I 


o 


"^r oo lo 


\D 


to 


o 


CM 


t LO 


h> 


CM Tf 


CM 


vO LO 


00 


^r 


CM 



o 
o 






tO O \D CM 

Tt Ifl H tO 



COO CM vO ^f i— I >— iCnC^CslOCM 

Locn to tooo to vo sorsir^ 



to 



00 vD 00 to -3- <* \D 

■rf vO H H O H N 

O -^" vO ■— I vO 

tO CM r-H 
1— I T— I 

■&e- 



1—1 


r-- r-« 


LO 


CM O 00 


LO 


vO 00 00 


t 


vO 


en 


LO 


cn r-^ 


LO 


i— I 00 i— I 


to 


vO en vo 


00 


O 


o 


t 


vO to 


00 


LO r-H 


"* 


en oo 


vO 


o 


LO 















CD 






i 














+J 


































13 






03 














c 


































03 






O 














CD 


































Jh 






•H 














6 
















i 


















E- 


T3 




c 














c 
















3 














c 






C 




=3 














rH 
















rQ 


1—1 












o 




i — i 


cC 




P 














CD 
















•H 


cd 












•H 




•H 






£ 






* 




•V 




> 
















rH 


•rH 












4-> 




03 


CD 




o o 






-4-> 




4-1 




O 
















■M 


u 












O 




4-> 


O 




U -H 






c 




c 




C5 






CD 










c 


o 












2 




CD 


c 




1— I 






CD 




CD 






10 


CD 


E 










o 


CO 






10 






rH 




a: 


rt 




- ,o 






6 




E 




i— i 


a> 


s 


o 








V) 


u 








CD 






+J 






H 




C 3 






C 




C 




03 


• H 


o 


o 








■l-J 




u 


0) 


CD 


• H 






1/1 


oo t; 


3 




O D- 






rH 




r-l 




O 


rH 


o 


c 






CD 


(= 


i-H 


o 


U 


E 


rH 






c 


e 


c 


t/i 


CD 


•H 






CD 




CD 




O 


+-> 


c 


r— 1 






E 


CD 


03 


4-1 


c 


o 


03 






o 


•H 


03 


C 


4J 


■M T3 






> 




> 




J 


t/1 


I-H 








o 


R 


c 




Zj 


o 


i-H 






u 


rH 




i — i 


rt 


03 C 


'S) 




o 




o 






3 




— 






o 


o 


co 


u 


c 


aJ 








2 


a> 




•t-j 


+-> o3 


CD 




CJ 


C 


o 


x-c 


TD 


rH 


W 






c 


03 


w 


C 


~ 


1— 1 


CO 






+-> 


4J 


i-H 


•» 


t/j 


U 


•H 


t/i 




cd 




u 


c 


c 


O 


rH 






1 — 1 


a, 


rH 


o 


'ft 










o 


O 


03 


o 


UJ 


O - 


+J 


CD 


i-H 


•H 


1— ( 


03 


03 


1 — 1 


J3 


O 




E 






CD 


•H 


c 


1— 1 


T3 




CXj 


7i 


cd 


V) 


o 




CX, to 


•H 


O 


03 


i-H 


03 


■(-> 






03 


■r-> 




u 


X 


rH 


Dh 


■M 


1 — 1 


oS 


C 


V) 


c 


u 


4-1 


CD 


C 


i-H 


w C 


i — i 


•H 


rH 


•H 


rH 


•H 


CD 


rH 


J 


CD 




03 


4-> 


CD 








c 


o3 


6 


•H 


+J 


~ 


i—l 


03 


rt 


c o 


•H 


> 


CD 


> 


CD 


r— 1 


■M 


CD 




•H 


E 


<+H 


rH 


MH 








o 




fi 


C 


C 


C 


O 


fS 


CD 


03 -H 


4-> 


?H 


T3 


■H 


-a 


•H 


03 


X 


5h 


rH 


r- 


C 


CD 


W 








in 





03 


•H 


o 


03 


<— 


■rH 


06 


>H +J 


3 


CD 


CD 


u 





s 


•4-> 


■M 


CD 


&H 


03 


o 


ex 


c 


in 






5-( 


bo u_ 


s 


u 


s 


^ 


PL 




H 




W 


(-U 




CL, 




co 


o 


X 


O 


u, 


z 


O 


03 


<s> 






CD 


a3 


































■M 


rH 






rH 


rH 


CD 






O- 


S 


































O 


D- 






D- 


H 


J 







-132- 



NO. 104 ESTIMATED PER CAPITA AND HOUSEHOLD DISPOSABLE INCOME BY 

POLITICAL SUBDIVISION, RANKED BY PER CAPITA DISPOSABLE INCOME: 1968 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



PER CAPITA 
DISPOSABLE INCOME 



RANK 



PER HOUSEHOLD 
DISPOSABLE INCOME 



RANK 



Maryland 

United States 

Baltimore Metropolitan Area 



Montgomery 
Howard 
Carroll 
Anne Arundel 
Prince George's 

Baltimore 
Talbot 
Harford 
Baltimore City 
Wicomico 

Washington 

Charles 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Calvert 

Kent 

Queen Anne's 

Dorchester 

Caroline 
Worcester 
Somerset 
Garrett 



(1) 



5 


,121 


2 


906 


3 


042 


4 


438 


3 


,423 


3 


,303 


3 


,294 


3. 


273 


2 


,972 


2 


,617 


2 


539 


2 


,521 


2. 


,454 


2 


,426 


2 


,377 


2 


,375 


2 


326 


2. 


292 


2 


288 


2 


,198 


2 


137 


2 


022 


2. 


022 


1 


,986 


1 


981 


1 


,855 


1 


,615 



$ 11,001 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
19 

21 
22 
23 
24 



9 


^592 


10 


,620 


15 


,980 


12 


,605 


11 


,952 


12 


,904 


12 


,031 


10 


,220 


7 


,886 


9 


,359 


8 


,337 


7 


,987 


7 


,987 


9 


,866 


7 


,513 


8 


,036 


8 


,973 


9 


,785 


9 


,026 


7 


,075 


6 


,702 


6 


,538 


6 


,239 


6 


,384 


6 


,150 


5 


,792 



1 

3 
5 
2 
4 

6 
16 

9 
12 
14 

14 
7 
17 
13 
11 

8 
10 
18 
19 
20 

22 
21 
23 
24 



Note: Net disposable income as estimated by Sales Management is net of taxes, 

and, therefore, differs from per capita personal income figures estimated 
by U. S. Department of Commerce. 



(1) 



Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Howard Counties 



Source: Sales Management, "Survey of Buying Power," June 10, 1969. Copyright 
1969, Sales Management Survey of Buying Power; further reproduction is 
forbidden. 



133- 



NO, 



107 GROSS STATE PRODUCT, MARYLAND, CURRENT AND CONSTANT DOLLARS: 1950-1970 



YEAR 



CURRENT DOLLARS 
($1,000,000,000) 



CONSTANT DOLLARS (1958 DOLLARS) 
($1,000,000,000) 



1970 (est.) 

1969 

1968 

1967 

1966 

1965 

1964 

1963 

1962 

1961 

1960 

1959 

1958 

1957 

1956 

1955 

1954 

1953 

1952 

1951 

1950 



17.3 
16.3 
14.8 
13.9 
13.4 



12 



11.8 

11.2 



10 
9 
9 



8.9 
8.2 
8.0 
7.5 
6.9 
6.4 
6.4 
6.0 
5.5 
4.6 



13.0 

12.7 

12.1 

11.8 

11.8 

11.2 

10.8 

10.5 

9.8 

9.4 

9.0 

8.8 

8.2 

8.2 

8.0 

7.6 

7.1 

7.2 

6.9 

6.4 

5.7 



Source: Maryland Department of Economic Development 



136- 






o 
c 
4 
o 
cd 



TO 

cd 

70 

o 

3 

03 



m 
o 
o 

3 
O 

3 

H- 

o 
(/) 

a 

< 

(/) 
O 

3 



O 
Hi 
Hi 

H- 

o 

a> 

o 

Hi 
CO 

c 
(/) 

3 
CD 

l/> 

m 
o 
o 

3 
O 

3 

H- 
O 
C/) 



CO 



a 

P 
4 



O 

Hi 



n 
o 



t-i ?<; o 

o P 4 

s: 3 a> 

P (/> 0Q 

P o 
t/> 3 



n 2 

O H- 

i— 3 

O 3 

4 cd 

P c/> 

Cl O 

O r+ 
P 



cd h 

a" <yi 

4 o 

p o 



w 3 v; 

X c/i i— • 

P H- < 

3 P 

3 

P 



T3 h pa 

CD 3 3" 

3 Cl O 

3 h- Cl 

t/> p CD 



O S X 2 O 

3" {u P H- CD 

h- (/> s: o i— • 

O JO 7P 
M . H . H . s; 

3 M-ffQ P 



p 

3 
Cl 



era 



P P 

4 (/) 
•< (/) 

t— i p 

p O 

3 3* 

Cl C 

t/i 

cd 

r+ 

ct 
t/i 



n z n 

p cd >— > 

►— ' s; h- ' 

Hi d 3 

o o o 

4 4 h- 

3 u> w 

H- CD 

P X 



z z > n 
a) cd i— ■ o 
< £ p 3 

p V) 3 

a- -< 7^ cd 
p o p o 

4 rt 

7T H- 

O 

c 

rt 



o 

Hi 



n 
o 



p 



rt 

cd 
Cl 

en 

r+ 

p 

rt 

n> 

V) 



W W W W W 04 Oa OJ OO OJ OJ OJ W 04 -t* .£> .pi JS» Jl> 4s. ^.-t^4^.-t^4^ 






On on on on On 

H w O^ ^ o 

■si H Ul 00 00 



ON On O on si 
■P^ -P* On tO s] 

M nJ ^ h (O 



si O0 00 to O 
Nl W 00 -^ H 

Ii3 Ul K) Ji W 



O H W N) W 
On 00 NJ 00 O 



OJ -P* 
On K) 
tO I— ' 



on on oo on 
i— i W -P* 00 
K) si to O 



K) K) M K) M 
1/1 A W K) H 



|sj i— ■ |_l I— ' 

O tO 00 si 



ON Ul J^ W K) I- » O IO O0 Nl o^ On *>. OJ K) f— ' 



2 


> 


> 


co s: 


t -1 


H 


?"n" 


i— i 


z 


Z 


c 


Z 


s 


O 


co 


O 


2 


H 


< 


< 


> 


^n ^ 


2 


z 


C-i 


H- 


4 


i — i 


o a> 


O 


CD 


CD 


c- 


o 


CD 


r+ 


o 


p 


CD 


o 


?^ 


o 


C. 


CD 


H- 


4 


HX 


H» 


CD 


<~. 


(/> 


?r 


p 


C w 


C 


3 


3 


P 


4 


£ 


P 


H 


h^- 


O 


C 


i— ■ 


3 


X 


H 


4 


h" 


o o 


W 


£ 


— 


</> 


P 


^r 


rt rt 


H- 


3 


ct 


3" 


rt 




3* 


rf 


3 


4 


rt 


P 


rt 


p 


~, 


era 


N 


H 3 


(/) 




i — i 


H- 


3 


P 


3* 


in 


cd 


c 


o 


3* 


2 




tr 


CD 


Crq 


3" 


3* 


P 


c/> 


O 


H- 


O 


H» H- 


o 


EC 


C/3 


t/> 


i/i 


3 


< 


H- 


w 


o 






CD 








H» 




O 


3 




3 


3 


3 


CL 3 


C 


P 


a 


w 


P 


P 


n h- 


P 


w 


?r* 




n 


X 




a 




P 


O 


3 


P 




rt 


H- 


P 


p era 


4 


3 


i — i 


(- 1 - 


w 




P 4 


3 


CD 


X 




p 


h" 




p 






P 


P 








P 






H- 


^3 


n 


^ 






4 TO 


P 


CD 






4 


O 




j^ 






?^ 


















w 


H 


^ 






O H- 










O 


o 




o 






o 


















3* 


i — i 


H- 






t- 3 

3 P 

P 










i— 1 

3 
P 






rt 

P 






rt 

P 


















4 

CD 


O 

z 



K) M K) K) W K) N N W M (O (O W W W W W W W W W 



t— ' On on on On sj 

VO K) On 00 h- > 00 
tsj O si O O O 



00 00 00 00 00 
H Ui l/i to to 
O O si O -t^ 



<£> O O O O 
tO t— ' OJ -t^ On 
-t» i— ' to O t— • 



O t— ' K) K) K) 
On K) on On to 
on -P^ j^. ^i ji,. 



W W W W W 

OJ Js. -Pi .£*■ 4^ 

W W*. Olsl 

ON si si tO -C^ 



Ui cn ^ -t> Ji ^ 
I— • O to 00 si On 



js. .£» 4^ 4^ 4^ 
On Ji. O-i to I— ' 



Ji w w w w 

O tO 00 s! ON 



W W W W W 

on ji w w w 



W W K) K) to 
O tO 00 si ON 



T3 

m 

I— I po 
/-^ z 

-&<* o n 

^ o > 

m i— i 
H 

> 



z 

o 
m 



o 

00 



►3 

m 

n 

> 

l— I 
H 
> 



n 
o 



tn 






c 

SO 



CO 



n 



H 
m 

c 
z 

h— I 

H 
tn 
o 

CO 
H 
> 
H 
m 
co 



o 
so 
o 
m 
so 



<o 

ON 

to 



-137- 



NO. 109 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME, UNITED STATES AND THE 51 
POLITICAL JURISDICTIONS, RANK ORDER: 1969 



POLITICAL 
JURISDICTION 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME 
($1,000,000) 



RANK 



United States 

California 
New York 
Illinois 
Pennsylvania 
Ohio 

Texas 
Michigan 
New Jersey 
Massachusetts 
Florida 

Indiana 

Missouri 

Wisconsin 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

Georgia 

Connecticut 

Minnesota 

Washington 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

Iowa 

Kentucky 

Alabama 

Kansas 

Oklahoma 

Colorado 

Oregon 

South Carolina 

Arizona 
Nebraska 
Mississippi 
Arkansas 
West Virginia 



$742,961 



83,070 



80 


989 


47 


609 


43 


243 


40. 


587 


36 


401 


34, 


574 


30, 


580 


22 


623 


21. 


777 


18 


891 


16 


086 


15 


437 


15 


416 


15 


377 


15 


045 


14 


108 


13 


610 


13 


350 


13 


046 


11 


197 


10 


413 


9 


782 


9 


210 


9 


062 


8 


,197 


7 


,872 


7 


,492 


7 


,244 


6 


,947 


5 


,648 


5 


,278 


5 


,174 


5 


,027 


4 


,748 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 

17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 

31 
32 
33 

34 
35 



(continued on following page) 



-138- 



NO. 109 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME, UNITED STATES AND THE 51 
POLITICAL JURISDICTIONS, RANK ORDER: 1969 (Cont'd) 



POLITICAL 
JURISDICTION 



TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME 
C$1,000,000) 



RANK 



District of Columbia 

Rhode Island 

Utah 

Hawaii 

Maine 

New Mexico 
New Hampshire 
Montana 
Delaware 
Idaho 

South Dakota 

Nevada 

North Dakota 

Vermont 

Alaska 

Wyoming 



$ 



3,869 

3,442 
3,129 
3,024 
2,972 

2,876 
2,491 
2,168 
2,167 
2,051 

2,011 
1,992 
1,852 

1,434 
1,272 
1,103 



36 

37 
38 
39 
40 

41 

42 
43 
44 
45 

46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 



Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Office of Business Economics, Regional 
Economic Division. 



139- 



SOCIAL SERVICES 

The State Department of Social Services succeeded the State Department 
of Public Welfare, effective July 1, 1968. The programs of the local departments 
of social services are subject to the supervision, direction, and control of the 
State Department. 

Generally speaking, the locally administered programs are public assist- 
ance, financial eligibility for medical assistance, child welfare services, and 
other services related to social planning. Funds for the various programs 
come from federal, State, and local sources, with percentage portions varying 
by the type of program. 

In fiscal 1968 almost $86,000,000 was paid out to individuals and families, 
an increase of 17.5 per cent over the preceding year and a 71.8 per cent increase 
in a five year period. Over 60 per cent of these payments were in the form of 
aid to families with dependent children. 64,886 cases received financial assis- 
tance, an increase of 7.6 per cent over fiscal 1967 and a 35.4 per cent increase 
from five years previous. 



-140- 









f- 




2 




PJ 


m 


u 


— 




< 


os 


> 


en 


1 — 1 


a. 


OS 




Dm 


in 




in 




CN 




, ( 




E- 




2 




PJ 




U 


J 


os 


< 


PJ 


U 


a. 


o 




— 1 


i—i 




r\i 




00 




v — ' 




F-. 




2 




PJ 




u 


UJ 


OS 


- 


BJ 


< 


CX 


— 




C/3 


CT, 




vO 




cm 




■vT 




*— ' 




,—, 




i- 




2 




PJ 




u 


— 




<- 


OS 


o2 


PJ 


— 


D- 


t_ 




pj 


t*o 


u_ 


M 




vO 




«tf 




co 




PJ 




os 




X 


J 


H 


< 


i — i 


F- 


a 


O 


2 


H 


PJ 




a. 




X 




PJ 






i— < 








H 




2 




PJ 




S 




H 




OS 




< 




a, 




PJ 




Q 



to 


in 


vO 


cr> 


rO 


i.r. 


LO 


i—l 


LO 


^r 


i — i 


LO 


CT. 


o 


i — 1 


o 


L0 


LO 


"vt 


vO 


CT) 


-r 


■ — i 


[N 


CT, 


00 


Ot 


CT> 


Cn 


vO 


- — i 


cn 


in 


00 


o 


vO 


o 


-T 


LO 


"vt 


00 


LO 


"vt 


cn 


cm 


00 


vO 


LO 


to 


IN 


■■■c 


to 


m 


vO 


CN 


Ot 


In 


o 


CN 


vO 


vO 


in 


H 


LO 


CM 


o 


LO 


to 


OG 


oo 


i-H 


o 


to 


i—l 


1 — 1 


"vt 


LP, 


IN 


■<* 


to 


i-H 


00 


i— 1 


CO 


X 


CN 


IN. 


CN 


o 


to 


i-H 


LO 


to 


o 


rj 


LO 


to 


vO 


"vt 


L0 


to 


oo 


i—l 


vo 


i—i 


vO 


LO 


I—I 


i— I 


r 


CM 


to 


CN 


tN 


vO 


i—l 


00 


CM 


vC 


vC 


in 


LO 


IN 


D 


-r 


CT, 


1—1 


"vt 


to 


1 — 1 



to to 

v£> CN 

cn o 

(Nl CM 



oo "vt 
Ot to 
in o 



oo 
■&e- 



cn 
in 



in 

o 



at 
oo 



to at 

"3" CM 
-5/3- 



1—1 


oo 


to 


"vt 


vO 


LO 


cr, 


LO 


^r 


to 


V3- 





00 

vO 



cn 
to 

en 



o o oo cn in 
o i- 1 o i— I i— I 

•—I CM 



r\i o i— i in vo 
i-H cm to CM 



""vT ^t oo at to 
rsi i— i vo 



oo o vo to 

to i—l 



cm at vo 



00 


LO 


vO 


vO 


CC' 


vO 


cn 


00 


i-H 


vo 


lO 


•-r 


LO 


to 


a> 


'O 


r-~. 


r*» 


vO 


vO 


CO 


LO 


vO 


00 


1—1 


vO 


in 


to 


at 


00 


-t 


-t 


to 


"vt 


i—l 


vO 


in 


LO 


LO 


to 


en 


i—l 


LO 


oo 


LO 


CNJ 


LO 


to 


en 


00 


1—1 


o 


o 


«* 


o 


|N 


at 


CN 


in 


CN 


to 


c 


-r 


X 


o 


o 


LO 


LO 


CO 


oo 


oo 


to 


en 


vD 


to 


en 


1—1 


M3 


at 


o 


00 


CT) 


M 


to 


^t 


o 


en 


en 


|n 


[-- 


1—1 


1—1 


-T 


vO 


en 


r-. 


en 


^r 


o 


en 


i—i 


CM 


-r 


CN 


in 


o 


CN 


cn 


CN 


^C 


in 


vO 


■<* 


CM 


CN 


to 


i-H 


en 


L0 


t~^ 


i — i 


vO 


vO 


r^ 


LO 


en 


LO 


00 


to 


h- 



CN 

vO 

to 



\Q en i— i to lo 
^ r^ vo ^r -* 
CN] ^ oo 



tO l>- OO v£> to 
tO CN O 00 vD 



Ol N N O 1^ 

lo r^ en \D vo 

i—i en 



tO LO 



c lo en \o ^f to 
i—i tj- en to o r~- 



vO i— ' LO LO O 


en ^ i\ c 


CN 


LO 00 to O vO 


IN \C H H 


CN 



h N to to n enLO'3- 

CNvOOO-NfLO ttON 

en (Ni rg 



en in lo lo ■— i i— ' en in 
en oo i— i to cn <st- cn en 



in lo ^t tooooocNicn 

tO tO IN i— I|N\£)N.00 
In ^h ^ INtOOi— IfNI 



en (Ni to \o o 
lo -^ oo oo i— i 
cn rr to to rj- 



O IN IN ^J- ^Q 

tO i— I v£5 CN1 00 
CNI ^ i— I i— I IN 



LO CN Tj- 

O K) ^ 

cn i— i *3- 



CN LO IN "3- tO 

in cn cn i— i to 

CN i— I LO vD i— I 



In CN LO CT. O LO 

cn cn vo cn to oo 
vD i-H oo in to to 



Cn rH LO C vO 
00 tO 'vj- LO IN 
tO ^t vO LO "* 



LO \D IN 00 LO 

cn "^ "?t cn cn 

to LO CN i— I o 



IN N. T^- ,— | ^H 

to o rH to IN 
LO cn in to i— I 



00 to -vl- 
vO LO to 
o cn cn 



vO 



o cn to (NCNencnoo 

CO "vj [N ^HtOvDLOtO 

i—l IN ^J- CM 0O 0O LO In 



to i—i oo cn in 

Cn (Nl vO CN In 

IN O i— I o o 



O LO i— I CN i— I 

cn vo (nj o i— i 
vD i— i lo "vj- cn 



-vt 

to 



CN tO tO 





d) 






















Ln 


1 — . 




















O 


cfl 




















id 


4-1 


1—1 


















•H 


o 


CD 


















4-> 


H 


T3 














Fh 




i—l 




C 


0) 












a> 




Ctf 


1 


>N 3 


Fh 




o 








4-" 




oa 




c u 





4-> 


c 


i—i 




(/) 


i/j 






If) 


a < 


£ 


f-l 


•H 


i—i 




CD 







LH 


0) 


bC 


•H 


CD 


1—1 


o 


i — i 


i—l 


X 




o 


■H 


CD 


4-> 


> 


o 


u 


•H 


u 


o 


1—1 




•M 


^H C 


i—l 


i — i 


u 


fH 


u 


rt 


Fh 


rt 


x 


c 


—i c 


cd 


rt 


as 


03 


CD 


X 


o 


+-> 


■M 


3 


< < 


ca 


u 


U 


U 


u 


u 


Q 


o 


■H 


O 


















H 


u 


u 



















o 

•H 

Fh 



-O 



Fh 

ti, 



4_) T3 

O Fh 

Fh m-i ai 

^ H J 

rt aJ o 

U X X 



>v 

Fh 


£ 
O 

4-i 

c 
o 





OO l/) 

Fh - 

O 00 

C - 
OCX 

< Fh 

rt 

o C S 
C 

•H 

Fh P 4-> 

a- cy cn 





oo +-> 

Fh O 

JD 

E rH 

O 03 



c 
o 

4-J 
OO 

c 

•H 

X 
oo 



Fh 

O 

O 4-) 

H 00 

6 

o o 

O Fh 

H O 



CM 

CN 

vO 

IN 

•vt 

oo 

CM 



00 



H 00 


LO 


IN 


vO CN IN 00 


cn cm in (ni 


to 


cn 


-t 


vD O 


CN 


^3" 


CN tO 


IN 


vO 


i-H 


IN 


o 


LO i— 1 


■5 en 


i— i 


vD 


-vf in vD cn 


cn i— i in to 


00 


00 


LO 


o o 


-vt 


vO 


vo cn 


to 


LO 


cn 


to 


CN 


"v* ^t- 


■5 -vf 


vC 


i-H 


i—i cn .i— i lo 


-vt O i— 1 CN 


"vf 


LO 


o 


\D O 


IN 


CN 


CM O 


to 


00 


LO 


to 


*fr 


i— 1 CN 



LO LO 

oo cn 
oo cr. 



1—1 


00 


i — i 


o 


vC 


a> 


CT. 


"vf 


LO 


CM 


^H 


IN 


LO 


r— 1 


cn 


vO 


cn 


o 


to 


CN 


o 


c 


i-H 


to 


1 — 1 


00 


1 — 1 


1—1 


cn 


^1- 


o 


i-H 


1—1 


\D 


IN 


vO 


vD 


o 


, ^- 


c 


c 


i-H 


00 


cn 


vO 


■vt 


CN 


i — i 


CN 


to 


IN 


i — 1 


IN 


CN 


cn 


CM 


cr 


i—i 


LO 


c 


IN 


LO 


CN 


CO 


LO 


vO 


o 


CN 


vO 


I — 1 


CN 


IN 


i — i 


IN 


"vl- 


cn 


[N 


IN 


LO 


LO 


i-H 


to 


co 


vO 


CT, 


i-H 


vO 


o 


00 


oo 


i-H 


vO 


CN 


LO 


O 


•t 


to 


-r 


o 


to 


cn 


"vf 


cn 


vO 


LO 


vO 


IN 


a. 


CN 


^1- 


"vf 


"vt 


LO 


to 


-T 


i-H 


IN 


cn 


^J- 


CN 


c 


IN 


CT, 


LO 


cn 


c 


IN 


o 


IN 


LO 


o 


LO 


vC 


to 


CM 


CN 


~t 


vO 


|N 


"vt 


-r 


"vt 


to 


CN 


i-H 



LO LO "vt 

lo cn cn 
lo cn to 



"vt 


cn 


to 


o 


o 


vC 


IN 


vO 


IN 


to 


CM 


1 — 1 


cn 


to 


to 


CT, 


i — I 


^t 


CM 


i — i 


r i 


~T 


cn 


cn 


o 


cn 


cn 


1— 1 


00 


CM 


i—l 


i— i 


CN 


00 


00 


vO 


IN 


LO 


i—l 


1 — 1 


00 


to 


^3" 


'vt 


vO 


CN 


cn 


CM 


IN 


cn 


LO 


[N 


to 


to 


to 


vO 


IN. 


C 


vO 


o 


vO 


to 


CN 


"vt 


00 


to 


at 


IN 


"vt 


00 


CO' 


n 


1— 1 


cn 


■—I 


-t 


r— 1 


o 


CN 


cn 


CN 


i-H 


^t 


00 


IN 


CM 


cn 


IN 


1—1 


r-i 


LO 


to 


o 


vO 


cn 


Tt- 


"vt 


^t 


tN 


IN 


CT, 


to 


vO 


en 


^t 


i — i 


"vt 


"vt 


"vt 


IN 


oo 


In 


en 


i— 1 


oo 


LO 


o 


i—i 


^H 


o 


CM 


c 


|N 


IN 


1— 1 


to 


CO 


LO 


L0 


to 


cn 


-r 


L0 


cn 


CN 


to 


<tf 


IN 


"vt 


oo 



"vtOCM"vt00 00 (Nl CO o 00 

00 i— I In LO vO CMCTivO ^i- o 

"vt ^- CN vO tO O IN "vt "vt vD 



Fh 

X 

o 



00 



CN 

IN 



00 
CN 

LH 

o 

on 


U 

3 



U 
O 

MH 
13 

O 

•H 

Fh 


a, 

u 
o 

•H 

Fh 

cx, 

o 

4-> 



ID 
C 
oo 

Ph -3 



3 

LM 



a o3 

3 Fh 

-i 

O T3 

C a) 

-I PL, 



3 



oo 

•H 

•n 

x 

4-J 



c 
o 

•H 
4-> 

o 


c 
c 
o 

CJ 



oo 

o 

O 

Ph 

e 

£3 

4-> 
00 

-3 
O 

o 

C+H 



00 

c 



no 

o3 


o 
C 



•H 

Fh • 

00 

PL. C 

X 

tv] 

•H 

^ 4-> 

Fh -H 

O U 

-3 



T3 4-> 

3 03 

r— I -H 

O Fh 

C 4-> 

•H 03 

Ph 

00 

E OS 
a3 

Fh "3 
OO C 

O 03 
Fh 

ex, - 

oo 

oo 

3 

O 00 

3 

C M-l 

a3 

^H QS 

1— I 

c 

O as 

oo X) 

•h 3 

S v-3 




Fh 
as 
4-i 



X 
3 
a, 

o 

4-J 

c 




Fh 
aS 
CL, 

Q 


4-> 

as 
4-J 
CO 

-3 

C 

as 
,— i 

>, 

Fh 

aS 



oo 

as 

>. 

i-H 

Fh 

E 
Fh 
O 

M-l 

C 

o 

c 



oo 


o 

•H 
> 

Fh 




o 

co 

<4H ^t 
O LO 



p. 



i— I CN to 



Fh 00 

a3 vo 
P.cn 
i—i 

a 

4-> 

4-> Fh 

aS O 

4-> P-. 

CO 

OS 
-3 

C '-i 

as aS 

-h 3 

X C 

Fh C 

aS < 




CJ 

Fh 
3 
O 
CO 



•141- 



NO. Ill PAYMENTS TO INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES IN MARYLAND: FISCAL YEARS 1966-1968 AND 11 















PER CENT 


PER ( 












CHANGE 


CHj 


TYPE OF PAYMENT 


1968 


1967 


1966 


1964 


1967/1968 


1964, 



Total $85,985,239 $73,180,402 $71,723,323 $50,047,758 17.5 

Aid to Families with 

Dependent Children 52,197,676 43,270,782 38,765,113 25,616,553 20.6 10: 

Aid to Permanently § 

Totally Disabled 11,113,988 7,974,038 7,353,358 5,808,234 39.4 9: 

Foster Care of 

Children 9,765,182 8,280,130 7,634,833 6,194,726 17.9 5; 

General Public 

Assistance 6,659,978 7,557,664 7,273,019 4,579,300 -11.9 41 

Old Age Assistance 5,718,910 5,548,809 10,066,195 7,263,091 3.1 -21 

Public Assistance to 

the Needy Blind 341,681 302,391 343,812 338,946 13.0 

General Public Assis- 
tance to Employables 187,824 256,588 286,993 246,908 -26.8 -2: 



Source: Maryland State Department of Social Services, known formerly as Maryland State 
Department of Public Welfare, "Annual Report" for years stated. 



-142- 



z 

UJ 



;> 


rj- 


>- 


vO 


< 


cd 


0- 


1—1 


UJ 


•1 


CD 


h~ 


< 


vD 


Oi 


CD 


UJ 


i— I 


> 




< 






00 


Q 


v£5 


5 


CD 

i—l 


Q 


CO 


UJ 


OS 


H 


< 


CO 


UJ 


1— 1 


>H 


co 




CO 


J 


< 


< 




u 


CO 


CO 


UJ 


(— 1 



t— I PU 



(J- 



OS 


u 


O 


o 




cc 


CO 


ex 


_J 




< 


>H 


3 


cc 


Q 




t—i 


X 


> 


J 


i— i 


1 — 1 


Z 


1: 


t— i 


Uh 


u_ 


Oi 


o 


O 


Pi 


-J 


UJ 


< 


CQ 


D 


Ǥ 


Q 
i — i 


z 


> 




i — i 


UJ 


Q 


u 


Z 


< 


i— i 


cc 




UJ 


Di 


> 


UJ 


< 


a. 



CM 



o 

z 



UJ E- 





CD 


2 




< 


W 




a: 


~ 




UJ 


X- 




> 


< 




< 


a. 








CT> 






^H 




a 




a: 


— 




UJ 


U] 




CQ 


i — i 




^ - 


CO 




b 


u: 




z 


< 





UJ 


H 




u 


Z 




< 


UJ 




Qi 


s 




UJ 


X 




> 


< 




< 


c_ 


t-- 






vO 






a> 






i—i 




Q 




Di 


— 




UJ 


CO 




CQ 


l—l 




2? 


CO 




3 


co 




z 


< 





UJ 


H 




u 


2 




< 


pq 




Di 


- 




UJ 


X 




> 


< 




< 


c_ 


co 






^o 






cd 






I — 1 




Q 




cC 


— 




UJ 


CO 




CQ 


l—l 




«^- 


CO 




uo 


co 




z 


< 



00 



CD 

to 



CM 



cd 



oo 
CD 

o 

tO 
CN 



LO 



LO 
LO 



to 

vO 
CN) 



4TC\i 
+->^— ' 
•h C 
2 CD 

CO 13 
CD i—l 



•H U 



u- c 

CD 
O "O 

+-> c 

CD 
13 CU 
• H CD 

< a 



to 

o 



CD 



-3- 

o 



o 
o 



to 



cd 

LO 



tO 






CD 

c 



13 
C 
aS 

r—i 
4-1 

C 
<D 

C 

as 

£ 

CD 

a. 



13 
CD 

i — i 
43 
aS 
to 



13 4-i 
• H O 

< H 



to 

o 



LO 

r-. 



<3- 






cd 



CM 

o 



oo 



O 

, — I 

to 

CD 





u 

ai 
U 

^ 

CD 
+-> 
CD 

o 

to 
o c 

<-H CD 
M 
to 13 
+-> i—l 
C -H 
CD X 
E U 
X 

as M-4 
a. o 



oo 

oo 



to 



LO 



CD 



CD 
O 



LO 



cd cd 

vO CD 

O O 



oo 



o 
oo 



c 



LO 

00 



t/I 

CO 

< 

CD 
< 

-a 



1^- 



to 



"3- 



a-. 



oo 
o 
c 



LO 

a. 



CNl 
00 



LO 
00 



uo 



o 



o 



o 



oo 



to 



c\i 
to 



to 



CN1 

oo 



LO 

to 



CD CO 
U < 



O 
+-> 

CD 

o 

C 13 

as c 

+-> -H 

CO i—l 

■H 02 
CO 

co X 

< 13 



CD CD 

■H Z 

i—l 

U3 CD 

3 ua 






to 
1^ 



CM 
00 
CM 



oo 



to 



to 

CD 
CM 









LO 

o 

CM 



CD 
O 

c 

as 
+-> 

CO 
•H 
CO 
CO 

< 

U CO 

• H CD 
■—I i — I 

3 aS 

D- X 

O 

i—l i—l 

aS CX 
U E 

CD UJ 
C 
CD O 

u +-> 



CD 

aS 
^i 

CD 
C^ 

X 

4-> 

•H 



CD 



o 
to 

00 
CXI 

oo 



oo 



o 

C+-I 



(4-1 

o 

CD 



o 

4-> 

CO 

!h 
CD 

CM 

CD 



CD 

u 

aS 
in 



U3 
Cl, 
M-i 



c 




w 










■H 




■H 




T3 




4-J 


H 













c 


3 




c 




4-> 







nd 




CD 

M 




CO 
•H 




E 
+J 


13 




T3 




CO 




M 







, — 1 




t/5 




as 


4-1 




• H 




as 




PU 


CO 




un 











•H 




o 




M 




a 


to 















to 




cm 




uo 




13 


as 




o 




E 
3 




aS 


CO 




M 




C 




i—i 


i—i 













X 


as 




X 









?H 


3 








W, 




as 


T3 




3 




a! 




S 


■ H 




c 




U 






> 













CO 


•H 









> 




ai 


T3 




bfl 




< 






C 




aS 








X 


• H 




M 










i—i 


^ 




> 




to 







O 




aS 




U 






E 

M 


CO 









c 




O 


CD 




-C 




4-J 




cm 


•H 




H 




O 






i—l 












C 


■ H 








13 




2 


E 








C 




o 


as 




CO 




a! 




c 


CM 





•H 




CO 




u^: 


CM 


-C 


, — 1 









•s 


O 


4-> 


•H 




> 




CO 




C 


g" 




•H 







u 


o 


c3 




4-> 




o 


CD 


E 


cm 




aS 




•H 


X3 








i—i 




> 


E 


as 


cm 









H 


3 




O 




H 







C 




M 








CO 


<D 


•H 












i—l 


M 


5h 


42 




• 




a! 


ai 


3 






■ H 




■H 


M 


13 


3 








CJ 13 


CD 




C 




•> 


. 


O 


> 


4-J 






CO 





CO 4-> 


aS 


c 







13 


13 


as 




CD 


t« 




C 


a 


cm +j 


O 


E 


ai 




3 


E 


O CO 


4-> 


X 


H 




cm 








a) 












4-> CO 


CO 


a, 


> 







M: 


C H 


H 




as 




4-1 





as 


(D 


CD 






aS 


2 


E 


CM 


bC 


CO 




> 




4-> X 


CD 


aS 


• H 




•H 


CO 


M 


H 


M 






M 


4-J 


ai m 




CD 







PL, 


c 


pu. O 


T3 


> 


M 









cm 


CD 


aS 







E 


E 


Q 


4-1 




-C 


, — 1 


o 


X 


z 


CO 


o 




vD 


H 


ai 


4-" 


•H 


4-J 


13 


LO 


CM 


P\ 


4-> ?H 


CO 







i 






aS o 


CO 


GO 


4-> 


o 


CO 


E 


4-J PL, 


aS 


c 


CO 


LO 


4-J 


O 


CO 




•H 


•H 




c 


r- 


cc 


U 


!h 


CO 


1 





2 


13 


CD 


M 


CO 




E 




C '-i 


43 


CD 


ri 


^1- 


X 


M 


aS ai 


E 


CM 




vO 


aS 


O 


—i 3 


3 


CD 


M 


CD 


PL,(4- 


X c 


C 


M 





i—i 






!h C 






uo 




co 


c 


as < 


CD 


4-> 


E 


. ^ 








S r 


M 


c 


3 


vD 


13 


M 




as 


CD 


C 


LO 


3 


13 




M 


E 




LO 


i—i 


i—i 







>, 





* 


CJ 


•H 





> 


aS 


X. 


to 


X 


4= 


o 


< 


PL, 


CNI 


r> 


UJ 

to 


U 


M 

O 
CO 



-143- 



NO. 113 CASES RECEIVING FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, MARYLAND: 1966-1968 AND 1964 (1 ' ) 



PER CENT CHANGE PER CENT CHANGE 
TYPE OF CASE 1968 1967 1966 1964 1967/1968 1964/1968 



~ 



Total 64,886 60,300 58,582 47,905 7.6 35.4 

Aid to Families 

with Dependent 

Children 27,924 24,555 21,768 16,295 13.7 71.4 

Aid to the Perma- 
nently § Totally 
Disabled 13,245 10,395 8,636 7,402 27.4 78.9 

Payments for Foster 

Care of Children 9,179 9,478 9,003 7,983 - 3.1 15.0 

Old Age Assistance 7,705 7,859 10,441 9,559 - 2.0 -19.4 

General Public 

Assistance 6,369 7,405 8,129 6,010 -14.0 6.0 

Public Assistance 

to the Needy Blind 346 337 362 397 2.7 -12.9 

General Public As- 
sistance to Employ- 
ables 118 281 243 259 -58.0 -54.5 



As of June of the respective years. 

Source: Maryland State Department of Social Services, known formerly as Maryland State 
Department of Public Welfare, "Annual Report" for years stated. 



144- 



102 


,362 


27 


,690 


16 
5 
1 
3 


,736 

740 

,395 

,819 



114 SERVICES OTHER THAN ASSISTANCE, IN PROGRAMS: FISCAL YEARS 1968 AND 1967 



FY FY 
PROGRAM 1968 1967 

tal Other Programs 92,659 

Foster Care and Adoption 28,631 
Services for Children 

Children 16,428 

Agency Foster Homes Under Supervision 6,298 

Agency Foster Homes Approved During Years 1,528 

Agency Foster Homes Not Approved During Years 4,382 

Class H License (Family Homes Receiving Child- 47 45 

ren Directly From Parents) 

Protective Service For Children (Families) 4,064 3,506 

After Care Supervision (Children Discharged 848 1,419 

From Training School) 

Requests For Certification For Medical Assist- 52,996 64,634 

ance 

Certified 37,673 52,306 

Not Certified 15,323 12,328 

Requests From Other Agencies 3,983 3,525 

Adoption Investigations For The Courts 276 181 

Other Court Requests 252 301 

All Others 3,455 3,043 

Families Or Individuals Receiving Other 2,090 1,543 

Services 

Jirce: Maryland State Department of Social Services, known formerly as Maryland State 
Department of Public Welfare, "Annual Report," for years stated. 



-145- 



NO. 115 



NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS FOR ASSISTANCE RECEIVED, 
APPROVED AND NOT APPROVED, NUMBER OF CASES ASSISTED, AND 
NUMBER OF CASES CLOSED FOR ASSISTANCE: FISCAL YEAR 1968 



PROGRAM 



RECEIVED 



PER CENT NUMBER NUMBER OF 

NOT NOT OF CASES CASES 

APPROVED APPROVED APPROVED ASSISTED CLOSED 

FOR FOR FOR DURING FOR 

PAYMENT PAYMENT PAYMENT YEAR ASSISTANCE 



Total 



54,822 



36,858 



17,894 



32.6 



Old Age Assistance 












(Individuals) 




3 


,409 


1 


,915 


Aid to Families with 


De- 










pendent Children 












(Families) 




23 


,691 


15 


,391 


Public Assistance to 


the 










Needy Blind 












(Individuals) 






126 




67 


Aid to Permanently $ 


Tot- 










ally Disabled 












(Individuals) 




6 


,984 


5 


,693 


General Public Assistance 










(Families) 




20 


,612 


12 


,628 


General Public Assistance 










to Employables 












(Families) 






(1) 


1 


,164 



1,494 43.8 



7,815 32.9 



49 



38.8 



1,278 18.2 
6,209 (2) 



1,049 



(2) 



89,253 32,065 



9,991 



412 



1,634 



2,128 



40,744 12,017 



59 



16,623 2,984 
19,849 13,408 



1,469 



(1) 
(2) 



Included with General Public Assistance Applications 
35.2 Per cent denied under GPA and GPA-E. 



Source: Maryland State Department of Social Services, known formerly as Maryland State 
Department of Public Welfare, "Annual Report, 1968," p. 66. 



146- 



iO. 116 



PER CENT SOURCE OF FUNDS BY TYPE OF EXPENDITURE, MARYLAND 
FISCAL YEARS 1968, 1967 AND 1964 





YPE OF EXPENDITURE 




1968 






1967 






1964 




FEDERAL 


STATE 


LOCAL $ 
PRIVATE 


FEDERAL 


STATE 


LOCAL § 
PRIVATE 


FEDERAL 


STATE 


LOCAL $ 
PRIVATE 


id to Families with 
ependent Children 


55 


38 


7 


58 


35 


7 


63 


33 


4 


id to Permanently 
nd Totally Disabled 


66 


21 


13 


67 


20 


13 


66 


19 


15 


ayments for Foster 
are of Children 


_ 


77 


23 


_ 


76 


24 


_ 


76 


24 


Id Age Assistance 


70 


16 


14 


71 


15 


14 


68 


17 


15 


eneral Public 
ssistance 


_ 


85 


15 


_ 


85 


15 


_ 


81 


19 


ublic Assistance to 
he Needy Blind 


65 


18 


17 


67 


15 


18 


66 


14 


20 


eneral Public Assis- 
ance to Employables 


- 


50 


50 


- 


50 


50 


- 


50 


50 



ource: Maryland State Department of Social Services, known formerly as Maryland State 
Department of Public Welfare, "Annual Report" for years stated. 



147- 



CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET 

The city worker's family budget refers to the annual cost of a moderate 
living standard for a family comprised of a 38-year-old husband, a wife not em- 
ployed full time outside the home, a 13-year-old boy, and an 8-year-old girl. 
This is the model family devised by the Bureau of Labor Standards, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Labor. 

In 1966 the total urban United States budget was $9,191 while the Balti- 
more budget was $8,798. The Washington budget for the same time period was 
$9,381. Using 28 metropolitan areas to equal 100, the Baltimore area had an 
index of 94 while the Washington area index was 100. As will be noted in ac- 
companying tables, average earnings differ considerably as between occupational 
groups when using the metropolitan areas base. 



-148- 



117 CONSUMER PRICE INDICES, U.S., BALTIMORE, MD . , AND WASHINGTON, D.C, 

(1957-1959 = 100) 



(1) 



1965-1969 



vR 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



U.S. AVERAGE 



|.9 

;.7 

,6 

5 



128 
120 
116 
113 
109 



129.5 
122.0 
116.5 
113.3 
109.6 



127.7 
121.2 
116.3 
113.1 
109.9 



Based on 50 urban areas for 1965 and 56 areas beginning 1966. 

:irces: U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review , 
U. S. Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1968 
(89th Edition. 



118 



CITY WORKER'S FAMILY BUDGET, 



(1) 



BALTIMORE 


AND 


SELECTED U. 


S. CITIES 


: AUTUMN 1966 


tY 








TOTAL BUDGET 1966 


ran U.S. 








$ 9,191 


5 York 








10,195 


Jton 








10,141 


i Francisco - Oakland 








9,886 


icago 








9,506 


Lneapolis - St. Paul 








9,495 


) Angeles 








9,445 


ihington, D. C. 








9,381 


Ueland 








9,297 


iladelphia 








9,193 


>roit 








8,981 


Lcinnati 








8,976 


Itsburgh 








8,919 


|riMORE 








8,798 



lias 

tanta 

>5ton 



8,472 

8,434 
8,387 



defers to annual cost of a moderate living standard for a family comprised of a 38 
/ear old husband, wife not employed full time outside the home, 13 year old boy, 
and an 8 year old girl. 



>rce: 



U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, "City Worker's Family 
Budget for a Moderate Living Standard" (Bulletin 1570-1). 



149- 



UJ 


UJ 






u 


> 






< 


t— 1 






os 


H 






m 


< 






> 


J 






< 


UJ 








OS 






H 


a 






UJ 


§» 






Q 








=> 


»s 


vO 




CQ 


CO 


v£> 






o- 


CTi 




>H 


3 


i— l 




J 


o 






1— 1 


os 




f — N 


|> 


u 


CO 


O 
O 


PI- 


J 


< 


I— 1 




< 


UJ 




CO 


2 


os 


II 


— 


o 


< 




OS 


I— 1 




t/1 


UJ 


< 


^ 


03 

CD 


OS 


a, 


H 


5h 


Q 


3 


i— i 


03 


3= 


u 


J 






u 


O 


C 


>* 


c 


0- 


a3 


H 




o 


■M 


i— i 


Q 


os 


•H 


U 


UJ 


H 


,— 1 




H 


UJ 


O 


UJ 


U 


S 


Oh 


■x 


UJ 




o 


P 


J 


oo 


Lh 




UJ 


cm 


4-> 


u. 


CO 




<D 


o 




2 


B 




2 


i— i 




H 


1 — 1 




T— 1 


CO 




UJ 


1— t 


o 


CO 


<3> 


< 


u 


os 


< 






UJ 


H 




< 


OS 






E- 


o 


> 




O 


s 


Q 




H 


PL, 


< 




PL, 


o 






O 


CO 






CO 


CJ 






UJ 


2 






u 


»—i 






1— I 

Q 


§ 






2 


< 






i— i 


UJ 







CTl 



O 
2 



< 

uj u 

t— i OS 

U- UJ 

U- J 

o u 

Q 
UJ 

-J E- 

t-H 2 

^ < 

CO J 

2 0- 

5 



_] 

< 

uj u 

U HH 

l-H OS 

PL, UJ 

PL. hJ 

o u 

Q 
UJ 

-J H 

1—1 2 

:*- < 

CO J 

2 Q- 

3 





CO 


H 


<M 




■- 


uu 






OS 


(J 


•O 




UJ 


a 


vD 




^s 


5 


tn 




os 


CQ 


i — i 


PL, 


o 






o 


s 


> 


2 






-J 


~ 


H 


>- 


1 1 


n 


L0 


H 


s 


— 


o 


i— i 


<^ 


3 


u 


U 


PL, 


< 



•st 


r- 


tt 


\D 


^r 


"*t 


to 


o 


CM 


00 


to 


<nT 


^r 


CTl 


t^ 


CTi 


oo 


o 


CTl 


CTl 


o 


o 


1— I 


cti 


CTl 


o 


o 


00 


cr> 


o 



oo 

CTl 



00 



tO 

CTi 



00 
00 



o 



to 

CTi 



CTi 
O 



00 
O 



00 
CTl 



00 
CTl 



LO 

o 



O 



tO 



00 
C 



CM 

O 



IO 

00 



CTi 
O 



oo 



vD LO 

O <-\ 



o 



■St 
o 



o 



00 

o 



oo 

CTl 



CM 


^D 


"St 


CM 


to 


^D 


■St 


CM 


LO 


CT) 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


CTi 


O 


00 


o 


O 



LO 

o 



■st 

CM 



LO 

O 



CTi 
O 



r~- 


<et 


CTi 


CM 


to 


00 


LO 


LO 


o 


■— i 


O 


O 


00 


o 


00 


o 



CM 

O 



LO 

o 



•st 
o 



o 



to 

o 



CD 
DO 
aj 
Oh 

c 

•H 

3 

O 



o 

c 
o 

0) 

C 



to 


•st 


CTl 


O 


00 


r-> 


•«* 


i— i 


to 


00 


to 


to 


to 


00 


v£> 


CT, 


vO 


\D 


o 


CTl 


O 


o 


CTi 


o 


o 


i— i 


CTl 


CT 


o 


o 


00 


CTl 


O 


CTi 


CTl 


CTi 



CM 

o 



o 



LO 


to 


CM 


LO 


LO 


r- 


LO 


to 


to 


vD 


to 


i—t 


"3- 


00 


CTi 


to 


CTi 


CTl 


,— I 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CTl 


o 


00 


o 


o 


CT. 


O 


CTi 



T— 1 


o 


o 


CTi 


CTl 


CTl 


CTl 


00 


00 


00 


o 


o 


o 


CTl 


CTl 


CTi 


CTl 


CTl 


CTi 


CTi 

















X 






















C 




13 










o 






















s 




C 










03 


!—) 




















CD 




oS 










(D 


3 




















+-> 




*—( 










CQ 


03 




















0$ 




■3 










W) 


Cl 




















CD 




o 






4-» 




c 


• 




















X 










■M 




o 


■M 




















■M 




1 






<D 




j 


CO 




















u 










Vh 


























o 




o 






<D 




i 


1 








• 












2 X 




o 






> 








W 






CD 










03 


D 




w 






UJ 




C/) 


f) 


•H 






S 








x 


•H 


1 (/) 




•H 










CD 


•H 


i— I 


c 












+-> 


X 


U 




o 




CD 


1 




i — i 


^H 


o 


o 


T3 


^ 


^ 


o 




•H 


o 


^. <D 




c 




<D 






CD 


o 


Oh 


4-> 


C 


13 


•H 


DO 




u 


■—I 


u <-* 




03 


O 


^ 


<D 


O 


DO 


Oh 


03 


DO 


03 


C^ 


3 


<D 






<D 


O 


C 


h 


r— ( 


3 


i—i 


DC 


c 


03 


C 


PS 


i— i 


03 


o 


•H 


U 


t/) 


T3 


>~ 3 


o 


PL, 


03 


Rj 


•M 


03 


< 


CD 


03 


•H 


<D 


^-( 


-J 


a 


<D 


o3 


03 


CD 


4J 




U-i 


3 


4-> 


o 




C 


■H 


X 


> 


4-> 






> 


w 


i— i 


3 2 


C^ 


c 


<+4 


,—1 


03 


•H 


in 


c 


-o 


w 


CD 


u 


• 


c 


C 


C 


•H 


CD 


O 


03 


3 


•H 


CD 


X 


o 


•H 


c 


03 


•—1 


o 


*J 


03 


<D 


03 


X 


2 


00 


CO 


DQ 


S 


CO 


CJ 


j 


S 


1 — 1 


S 


u 


O- 


CO 


CO 


a 


X 


0-, 



PJ 


UJ 






u 


> 






< 


i— i 






ct 


E- 






UJ 


< 






> 


J 






< 


UJ 








tC 






E- 


Q 






uj 


2 






u 


<c 






Q 








3 


•1 


^o 


/ _ N 


CQ 


CO 


v£> 


• 




a. 


CTi 


13 


X 


n 


i—l 


- 


iJ 


o 




+-> 


l—l 


06 




C 


U 


U 


CO 


o 
u 


U. 


-J 


< 


*« — * 




< 


UJ 




CO 


2 


DC 


1 — < 


- 


O 


< 


o 


Q£ 


i—i 




o 






i| 


1 — 1 


DC 


D- 


E- 


II 


o 


3d 


i—i 




s 


u 


J 


t/1 




CJ 


O 


rt 


X 


o 


a. 





E- 




o 


U 


t— 1 


Q 


cc 


a3 


u 


UJ 


E- 






E-H 


UJ 


C 


PJ 


u 


S 


as 


p- 1 


UJ 




+-> 


H 


j 


oo 


•H 




UJ 


CM 


i—l 


tu 


CO 




o 


o 




2 


Ph 




2 


i—i 


o 


H 


l—l 




fH 


CO 




UJ 


+-> 


o 


CO 


CJ 





u 


ex 


< 


E 




UJ 


H 




— J 


farf 


^ 


.—i 


< 


Di 


<] 


i— 1 


E-i 


O 


> 


;< 


o 


s 


Q 




F 


u_ 


< 




u. 


o 






o 


CO 






00 


CJ 






UJ 


2 






u 


i— i 






l—l 


2 






Q 


2 






2 


< 






l—l 


UJ 









J 




< 




UJ cj 




U i-i 




1 — 1 Q£ 




U- UJ 




a. j 




o u 




Q 




UJ 




-J E- 




-J 2 
i—i <C 




><i ,-J 




co a. 




2 




3 




UJ 




U 




Q 2 
UJ < 




-1 2 




J UJ 




i-i h 


/ N 


^ 2 


1 1 


CO i—i 


> ' 


< 


CO 


s 


u 




2 




i—i 




2 




2 


J 


< 


< 


UJ 


UJ CJ 




U i-i 


UJ 


i—i DC 


CJ 


U- PJ 


< 


a. j 


OS 


o u 


UJ 




> 




< 


Q 




UJ 




J 




J E- 




1—1 2 




CO J 




2 CL 




32 




UJ 




u 




a 2 

UJ < 




J 2 




J UJ 




l-H h 




^ 2 




CO i-H 




< 




2 


CO 


E-h CM 


— 


UJ w 


ac 


cj vo 


UJ 


a vo 


M 


3 cd 


OS" 


CQ ,-H 


U- o 




OS 


X 2 




J s 


E- X 


>-1 3 


co H 


^ f- 


O i-i 


5 33 


CJ U 


Uh < 




< 




UJ 




a£ 




< 



cd 



CM 

o 



o 
cm 



o 



tO <5j- 

O .-I 



to 

o 



o 



LO 
CM 



CTi 



CO 



tO 

oo 



oo 
oo 



oo 



to 

CD 



oo 

CD 



CM 

O 



LO 

o 



O 



-* ^H 
O O 



tO 

cd 



cd 

CT) 



CD 



CM 

O 



CTi 



O 



CD 
CT) 



to 

CT) 



O 

o 



oo 


oo 


CM 


o 


oo 


o 


o 


CD 


O 


CM 


o 


CT) 



LO 

r-- 



CT) 



t^ 

r- 



o 

CT) 



LO 

CTi 



00 
CT 



O 
O 



O 

o 



"3- 

o 



CT) 



CT) 



O 
O 



r~- 


r~- 


sO 


^O 


LO 


^r 


to 


O 


O 


CT) 


CT) 


CT) 


CT) 


CT 


CT) 


CT) 


CD 


CT) 


CT) 


00 







•H 




X 












X 




4-> 




M 


UJ 










aj 




03 




u 


Di 










CQ 


a! 


c 


+-) 


3 


O 




a3 




C 




4-> 


e 


•H 


4^ 


Si 


C 


■M 


O) 


o 


C 


•H 


• I-I 


o 


a) 


l-H 


o 


c 


OS 


■M 


CO 


X 


CJ 


!h 


•M 


H 


+J 


03 


i—i 


CO 


CD 


u 


c 


■M 


+J 


-J 


X 


i—l 


i — i 


3 


in 


•H 


• I-I 


CD 


•H 


< 


o3 


■I-) 


o3 


n 


U 


^ 


u 


a 


CX 


CQ 


Q 


< 


Q 


X 



M 








C 








•H 








T3 




O 




3 •-< 




o 




i—l 03 




1 — 1 




CJ o 








X -H 




>, 




^1 




X 




CD 








C/5 i—l 




4- 1 




M O 




l-H 




C 




3 




•H <D 




CO 




c o 




• 




Jh -H 




5i co 




03 <-t-i 




i—i 




CU M-| 









o 




X > 




>> 




•M 




^H ?H 




i—l 




Jh O 




bo 




^ C|_i 




C co 




O 




■ h bC 




X <fl 




X c 




bO 




i—l -H 




CD C 




Ph c 




tX -H 




• H 5h 




o3 C 




4-* 03 




fn ^i 




i—l CD 




03 




3 




> UJ 




E "3 




rt 




C 






CO 


13 03 


^r 


o • 


^C 


C 


^3- 


+-> CO 





o3 to 




4-> 





+J 




ch 


3 


« CO 


Qh 


4-> -H 


AJ 


o 




03 x 


5h 


> O 


" 


l—l t/) 


O 


•H 


CD 





3 


■M bi 


\Q 


fn 




03 C 


CD 


4-> 


13 


^H -H 


i-H 


</) rt 


5h 


> 




51 -H 


a3 


5l -H 


•N 





13 


1 — 1 


r~* 


A< 13 


C 


•M 


CD 


5i C 


03 


CO C 


5i 


O o3 


+J 


O 


03 


2 


tn 


O 


S 


X 




3 




+-> 05 


5i 


+J -M 




C 13 


O 





^ 


03 -H 


HH 


bo xi 


•v 


l—l 1 — 1 




13 


3 


D, O 


-a 


3 C 





X 


■ H 


X O 


• H 


T3 


03 


•H 


> 


CD « 


Oh 


+-> 





i—l CO 




X 03 


ac 


-1 T3 


CO 


4_) -H 




•H C 





CD 


?H 


^ 


■H 


X o 


o 


W ^ 


5h 


X CO 


X 


C 


03 


co 


o3 


3 


l-H 


03 


hJ 


2 


03 


> 




13 


CO 


•H 


X 


C C 




4-> X 


i — i 


03 O 





03 4-> 


X 




E 


i-H 


4-> 


U. 


•H 


3 


c 


O 5i 


4-1 


5h O 


o 


c o 


1 


X 


s 


03 3 


■M 


i/) 


z 


C 


X 


bO 




5i 


DO 


a3 co 


•* 


•M O 


■ H 


3 


5h 


C Mi 


o3 


CD 


O 


•H 


5h 


03 -H 


X 


a3 T3 


4-> 


13 


a3 


E C 


CO 


5h C 


-J 


OS 




a3 -h 




13 


5h 




C+H 





03 





O 


-i E 


i—i 


X bO 




i—l -H 


3 


4-> 03 


4-> 


•H ■(-) 


M 


■M 


c 


^C 5i 





bC c 





CO 


5h 


C o3 


E 


> 




•H > 


+-J 


5i O 


O 


13 13 


5h 


O 


4-> 


•H 03 


o3 


Ch 5i 




> 


Ph 


O 





•H 





03 hi 


4-J 


13 > 


Q 


+-) 


03 


• H 




03 X 


i — 1 


X -M 




-a o3 





X3 oS 


CO 


ex 


5h 


i-H 









13 


■ 


W) E 


LO 


5h 


33 


03 3 


5h 


•M 




2 -H 





3 




E 


,X 


Ph CO 







5h 


E 





X 5h 


O 


5£ 


O 


H D, 


3 


5h 






, V 


3 


H 




CM 


O 






v — ' 


CO 



-151 



STATE FINANCE 

Maryland's fiscal 1968 State expenditures totaled $1,088,907,000. Of this 
total, 34.1 per cent went to education, 17.1 per cent to highways, and 10.6 per 
cent to public health, hospitals, and mental hygiene, with 9.7 per cent going to 
public welfare. 

During the same fiscal year the State received $1,063,921,000 with 28.9 per 
cent of that total coming from income tax sources, 13.7 per cent from retail sales 
and use taxes, 9.2 per cent from motor fuels taxes, 16.3 per cent from motor vehicle 
user taxes, fines and licenses, 17.2 per cent from federal grants, and 6.6 per 
cent from bond issues. 

Net cash expenditures have increased nearly 140 per cent from fiscal year 
1960 to fiscal year 1968 while net cash receipts have increased more than 123 per 
cent over the same time period. As might be expected, the fiscal 1968 growth 
is quite large in both categories, with net cash expenditures nearly 19 per cent 
above the year- earlier figure and the net cash receipts standing over 13 per cent 
above the prior year. 



152- 



u 



— 
u 

a: 

— 
— 



o OC 



c 



1^- 

cr. 



oc 
c 
cr. 



co 

< 



< 



2 
< 

>- 

< 



CO 



r- oc 
Oi en 



u p 

_ — 



2 < 



E 1 

2 < 

u c 



— c 



CO 

< 



co 



C_J 



c 

CM 



c 

2 



cm •q- r^ oc 



OCiTL.O'3-vC^O^" 



to oorsioci— •Ofoo^i-O'— it^rva^rcr^-u^ 

cm ■— ' c*. — ' oc ci oc oo p- 1 w h n oc \o i/! i/; 



< < < 



(N 00 O X H <f H M 



T* r^ N r-l c 

c cm —i ai "=3" 

(N N H C — 



r- r-~- en 
LO vC cm 



n^c^c 1 . r. ^cc^lc L^tOrHCCMLnootNi cn t^ <n (n ^t tj- cm to 



CrnClNvCNNCOJC 

— . rr ^r — cm 



O •— « "^ tO vO 

— I LO 



rr oo \c n vc 

W W ^f H N 



LO i— I oc 
tO M IT, 



O — ~(N\CM'*OCir>LnMaiOCNCM 



rO tO tO 



oc cm r-» «>r lo 

r^ cm -— > ■— i 



OC LO tO CM CM 



O ** t-^ i— I CM 

N ^J LT, H H 



^r CM CM 
0\ rf LO 



o 
to 






CM 



CM 

to 



ocoeoeocroooooco^^^ cooco ooo 

tO -T CM CM i— i CM — i Ln CT> O vC O OC CM LO to tO to i— ' C. >— ' ^3" vC (J) T. C 



— lt. lo C: ^f to c t^ vC cm 

to — 



cr. oc oc m 



C C N W l/! 
vO CM CM 



3 £■) „h to oc lo w lo r^ r~- to oc 



tOtOCTltO'vrCTlt^LOCMCM'— — 

h M H — 



to o to cm i— i lo cm to cr, cm 

rt N >3- LT, Tf tO rl 



■=3- c. lo 

"=3- — i CM 



CM LO 



<f C N « " C. (N N vO r- itO\C\OCOOi/lCD\C 



C*> LO t^ LO CM i— I LO \0 
(M N N N C OCCMLO 

cm n- to ^r oi ^r n- o 



fNHLC vCCCtCWHNl/lNNOON 
Ci •— lOCtOtOO^r-^LOCMCMi— i^^i— I — — 

\0 CM — < i—l 



O (N ^ LO LO t^- CM •— IIT, ^•^■N\CtO(NMf5(Ni- 1 



oxwiotOQhinNMHr-., i 

N N (N i- H 



i£) 00 O vD O 

IO T t- tO H 



CM tO LO C: to 

r~- vc lo ^3" i— i 



01 t^ CM 
O sS 'fl- 



\C LO i— I 



'=3"Cr. r^CMLOOCMCvOt--~'d-i— itOCMLO"=3-i— itO C C t C. H t^ LO CM 

tOLo^-^HLOfj^o^toooi— ir--i— tcr^-^j-LOi— i^- •^■lo-^-looo oo "3- tj- 

~J. Nf^WtONOOlT, vOINvDHOOlflOl CM OCCMOI^t^ O — LO 



or^i— ' O LO t^- LO OC LO LO OC v£; ^5" CM 00 CM i— I 
— OI^tO^ro^I^LOCMCM^H— i — i— i 

OC tO CM — 



^H fM ts Cl N tO 
OC O LO ^3" i— I 



c to r^ 

f-- LO ^H 



















tf) 




V) 

o 


















































CJ 




X 


















































eo 




OS 


















































^ 




H 


















































OS 








y> 








































to 


(/) 




jr 




^ 




o 


to 










to 




























o 


o 




u 




■M 




X 


CJ 










c 




x 
























X 


X 








^ 




rt 


X 










o 




■M 












c 


to 










OS 


oS 




o 




O 




L_i 


03 










•H 




i — 1 












o 


■M 










— 


C— i 




CJ 




ft 






— 










to 




OS 












•1-H 


ex 














(A) 


■— 




o 




Ifl 












Ifl 




CJ 






X 






to 


• — 










a) 


— 1 


CJ 


> 




Sh 




CJ 


CJ 


Ifl 






DO 


.^- 










+-> 




c 


to 


o 


tO 








•T. 


O 


X 


U 




a. 




•H 


DC 


o 






c 


e 










•H 




o 


. — 


o 


O 








3 


a 


— 


o 








c 


03 


X 






•H 


-z 




0© 




c 


?H 




•rH 


= 


<D 


o 










i^. 


F- 


CO 




i—i 


t/5 


03 


U 


OS 






.- 


< 








o 


3 




■M 


— 




PL, 








U3- 










OS 


CJ 


ex 


CJ 


— 






to 






o 




•r-i 


CJ 




o 


□ 










tO 




o 


o 


•^ 


t« 


c 


X 


= 


> 








.— 


uD" 


to 


^ 




+-> 


CJ 




g 


u 


.c 


bS 


to 


to 


c 


tO 


i—i 


i—i 


w 


o 


o 


OS 


c 


CJ 


DO 






^_ 




+-> 


OS 




OS 


CO 






tfl 




o 


— 


o 


a 


o 


o 


CJ 


X 


to 


t — i 


u 


-•- 


c 


to 


to 




to 


c 


4-i 




o 






+-> 


to 


od 


■r. 


X 


03 


•H 


— 


• H 


• rH 


CJ 


OS 


Fh 








• — 


CJ 


o 


•_c 


•M 


- 


-H 




- 


■t-l 


to 


to 


— 


CJ 


o 


03 


r 


P 


OS 


— 


X 


Li* 


— 


CJ 


CJ 


CJ 


o 


o 


X 


X 




c 


^H 


o 




— 


c 


CJ 


c 


OS 




X 


E-* 


— 


03 


W3 


1) 


9) 






a, 


t/5 


o 


.— 


oS 


03 


— 


DO 


CJ 


'^ 


3: 


t/i 


'•' 


o 


3 


o 


O 


4J 


oS 




•H 


^ 




> 


> 




o 




•iH 


c 


1— 1 


iV 


— 


f— ' 


c 


B 






>^ 




F 


to 


u 


-^ 


O 


— 


o 


> 


O 


— 1 






>. 


u 


uff ^ 


03 


o 








■H 


o 


1—1 


CJ 


03 


o 


X 


to 






2 




= 


•iH 


— 


•rH 


in 


Lh 


?-( 


u 




CJ 


U 




u 


■ 


u 


•M 


to 


03 


•H 


3 


•r- 


o 


HH 


a 


o 




^H 





— 


- 


OS 


O 


O 


T3 


OS 


r-H 


c 


3 





tfl 


~ 


o 


c 


3 


fn 


i— i 


- 


i-H 


1 — 1 




■p 


•M 


— 


03 


CJ 


C 


o 


P 


■M 


■t-J 


C 


D 


~ 


03 


t/i 


o 


Lh 


— 




= 


E 


CJ 


ri 


^: 


— 


c- 


-D 


n! 


OS 


03 


■m 


c 


— 


C_) 


u 


□ 





3 


c 


o 


J-i 


C 


1— 1 


o 


o 


— 




<d 


-a 


3 


._ 


~ 


E 


c 


4-> 


■4-> 


+J 


O 


~ 






ci 


S 


^_ 


to 


— 


2i 


tL. 


— 


< 




- — 


o 






o 


c_ 


— 


CL 




o 


CO 


CO 


O 


E-i 




































— 










CQ 







oS 








E 








C 








■H 








— 








O 








o 








-C 








CJ 








to 








DO 








c 








•H 








c 








•H 








oS 








h 








+J 








to *a 








■P C 








CX 03 








• — 








u — 






to 


CJ 03 






h 


CJ +- 






oS 


h ._ 






CJ 


PL: 






X 


+-> to 








o c 






-3 


— _c 






O 


c - 






cfi 


•H tO 






P 


<u 






to 


"3 O 








O M- 






Lh 


— 






O 


3 — 






4-1 


— - 








CJ -rH 






~ 


C CJ 






•> 


• H -H 






■t-j 


^ 






h 


P 14- 






c 


o c 






£- 


c 






:■ 


•> 






OC 


to 








- :. 






^H 


03 -H 




• 


~ 


P 




u 


3 


to -H 




oS 


C 


P tfl 




u 


C 


cx u 




>- 


< 


■- CJ 






~ 


Cv > 




^— 




u •- 




r: 


^ 


u c 




u 


O 


Fh 2 




to 


c 






• — 


03 


00 — 




u_ 


i—t 


c c 






X 


■ — cd 


• 


o 


u 


p 


to 


\0 


— 


OS to 


— 


C7i 


iS; 


P O 


- 


i — i 




O DO 


3 




<4- 


U CJ 


t+- 


CJ 


o 


i-H 




_c 




5h ^h 


■3 


p 


X 


O O 


CJ 




h 


s: cj 


P 


c 


3 


p 


to 


■H 


to 


O 


CJ 




03 


p 


> 


to 


CJ 


-3 03 


- 


p 


U 


C P 


- — 


C 


— i 


ctS to 




3 






c 


O 


o 


to P 


o 


CJ 




C 03 




CJ 


p 


O 


p 


03 




•H tO 


■s. 




4h 


P CJ 


<D 


S-, 


O 


CJ CJ 


5h 


O 




- — 


O 


j^ 


U 


tfl 


■M 


P 


V 


c c 


c 


o 


^H 


n o 


•H 




^H 


S-, -H 




o 


o 


p p 


-a 


p 


S-* 


•H 


c 


c 


p 


P 3 


oS 


■H 


ex 


C P 






E 


a> 


•> 


"3 


o 


E u 


tfl 


O 


u 


p "3 


CJ 


^~ 




to 3 


zi. 


L< 




CJ i-H 


f-t 


c 




> CJ 


- 


'-0 


o 


C C 


JC 


XS 


CJ 


hH — 


o 


< 


u 


■^ f — ^ 






^ 


H CM 


to 


o 


-* v — ' 






co 



153- 















































H 








cn 


/ — \ 


t — \ 


Z 


n 


-a 


> 


o 




cn 










cn 


T3 


■a 


rr, 








tn 


o 






o 


NJ 


1— ' 


P 


o 


C 


CL 


CD 


rt 


CD 


a 


S 


cn 


t- 


CD 


c 


C 


H" 


O 




CO 


o- 


rt 


3 




c 


1 — ' 


* — ' 


rt 


4 


cr 


CL 


cr 


O 


3 


CD 


pa 


r^ 


CD 


3 


cr 


cr 


TO 


rt- 


rt 


rt 


c 


P 




4 


n 


i—i 


C 


4 


>— ■ 


H- 


rt 




CD 


nd 


4 


P 


TO 


CD 


i— i 


i—" 


3" 


3" 


O 


P 


o 


H- 1 


-a 




o 


o 


3 


4 


CD 


H- 


rt 




t— 


4 


p 


X 


rt 


H- 


4 


H- 


H- 


s: 


CD 




rt 


p 




m 




o 


J 


< 


P 


O 


o 


H- 


cn 


o 


p 


4 


1 


CD 


in 


P 


o 


o 


p 


4 


-a 


CD 


rt 


2 






• • 


T3 


CD 


i— ' 


rt 




O 


CD 


o 


t— • 


rt 


P 




i — i 


i — i 






x 




o 




H« 


CD 


o 






03 


t/l 




H- 


cn 


3 


4 


p 




3 


3 


m 


pa 




s: 


re 


in 


CO 


i— • 


an 


O 


rt 


TJ 






4 


rf 


pa 


o 


P 


P 


< 


I— 1 


"a 


CD 


CL 


3 


rt 


CO 


CD 


CD 




rt 


H- 




3 








n 


SL 


3 


CD 


3 


Hi 


t— ■ 


H- 




c 


3 




t3 


H- 


rt 


l—i 


P 




P 


rt 


— 




cn 


m 




o 


c 


CD 


(/) 




CD 




n 


o 


4 


rt 


<V 


h- 1 


< 


P 


Hi 


i— 1 




rt 


H- 


CD 




p 


X 




3 


i—" 


3 


o 




rt 


03 


CD 


o 


Id 




C 


O 


CD 


rt 


P 


rt 




CD 


O 


CL 




<M 


■T3 




XI 


a> 


rt 


c 




X 


c 




< 


O 


O 


4 


^ 


%• 


n> 


4 


rr 






P 


CD 




3" 


tn 




rt 






4 






H- 




CD 


C/l 


H) 


rt 


CD 






CD 






-a 


i—i 


4 






z 




4 


CL 


rt 


o 






1— ' 




4 


CD 






CD 


c_ 


cn 








4 




9J 




m 


o 




O 


p 


4 


CD 






CL 




3 




m 


> 


W 


c 


o 








O 


cn 


1 — 




X 


I—I 




t— < 


r+ 


03 


I/) 






H- 




3 


H 


3 


C 


— 


C- 


< 








TO 


C 






T3 


H 




1— ' 


03 


3 








3 




CD 


P 


Td 


rt 




M- 


CD 








4 


— 


T3 




CD 


C 




a> 




i/i 








TO 




3 


X 


>— ' 


~ 


— 


o 


4 










a 


c 




3 


pa 




4 


Hi 


03 








(/) 




rf 


CD 


o 


O 


CD 


H- 


3 








§ 


H- 


— 




CL 


tn 






o 


o 












</) 


I/) 


X 


H 


rt 


P 


3 








w 


< 


1— 1 




H- 






o 


4 


rt 








■C" 








3 


H- 


H« 


M 


CD 










H« 


H- 




rt 






t-b 


i— ' 


o 








-n 






O 


CD 

3 


rt 


4 

CD 


" 


3 










to 


O 




c 

4 






rt 


to 


3 








P 






W 


rt 




2 


m 












o 


CO 




CD 






3- 


CTs 


</> 








o 






rt 






CD 


X 












3 


o 




W 






CD 


O 


03 








I— 1 






4 


CD 




3 

rt 


CD 

o 












W 


— 
o 




1— i 






H 


03 


3 








H- 






cr 


n 






c 














c 




> ( 






4 


4 


Cl 








rt 






c 


c 






rt 














h- ' 










0) 


CD 










H- 






r+ 


4 






H- 
























p 




O 








CD 






CD 


H« 






< 














> 










c/i 


3 


rt 








(/) 






a. 


rt 






CD 














H- 










c 


O 


3' 
















^ 




















o- 










4 


rt 


CD 














































*< 


03 


4 














































o 


< 


4 








































■&<5- 






H) 


03 


O 

rt 








































I— 1 


-&* 






2 


1— ' 


P 


























i—" 


i—i 


t— • 


I— 1 


NJ 




CM 


o 


i— 1 






P 


SL 


r+ 


i— i 


1— > 


NJ 


JS» 


Cn 


On 






' — 1 


N3 


CM 


vj 


O 


!—> 


CO 


CM 


W 




*-J 


oo 


i* 






4 


cr 


H" 


t— ' 


^J 


00 


lO 


On 


~-J 




^O 


o 


Cn 


-t^ 


CO 


Cn 


** 


ON 


NJ 


CO 




>—> 


CO 


o 






X 


h— • 


3 










































o 






i— ' 


CD 


TO 


*> 


to 


CM 


o 


^J 


«-J 




NJ 


K) 


3 


CM 


<4D 


00 


to 


o 


4^ 


CO 




NJ 


to 


o 






P 


• 




-J 


o> 


NJ 


NJ 


lO 


-fi. 




^J 


NJ 


--J 


-&> 


NJ 


i— ' 


ON 


INJ 


NJ 


CM 




ON 


o 


s — / 




t— ' 


3 




CJ- 


<o 


NJ 


O 


On 


O 


t— ' 




00 


K) 


i — i 


vo 


O 


ON 


to 


Cn 


00 


NJ 




O 


-g 






to 


a- 




H- 














































ON 


V 




cr 














































oo 


z 




c 










































o 


T3 




> 




4 










































-ft 


tn 




3 




[/) 








































>—' 




pa 




3 




CD 




























t— ' 


i—i 


»—i 


NJ 




CM 


o 


H 






C 




3 


1—1 


i—" 


NO 


4> 


Cn 


ON 








K> 


CM 


~-J 


<4D 


o 


~nJ 


NJ 


i — i 




4^ 


o 


O 


n 




PJ 




CD 










































H 


tn 




i— 1 




3 
rt 


1— ' 


On 


ON 


C7> 


NJ 


N) 




VO 


VO 


CM 


NJ 


NJ 


^J 


t—' 


I— 1 


NJ 


to 




l— 1 


o 


> 

t— 






pa 




W 
















































a> 




















































^ 




03 








































-CV5- 


, s 






O 




4 






























1 — 1 


1— ■ 


1 — 1 




NJ 


to 


fee- 






4 




CD 




I— 1 


NJ 


0> 


4> 


-J 








K) 


K> 


ON 


to 


00 


ON 


l—i 


o- 




-J 


I— 1 


I—" 






rt 






to 


4=» 


w 


Cm 


to 


t— ' 




-J 


00 


I— • 


On 


CM 


NJ 


CM 


to 


1— ' 


4i> 




Cn 


Cn 


«• 






v* 




3 










































o 






™ 




O 


^J 


o 


1 — 1 


o 


i—" 


CM 




^J 


It* 


4^ 


VJ 


to 


O 


ON 


00 


ON 


NJ 




to 


-J 


o 










rt 


ON 


Cn 


w 


J> 


i — i 


o 




1—1 


4- 


ON 


00 


o 


*» 


Cn 


NJ 


00 


--J 




ON 


to 


o 






H> 






in 


O 


00 


o 


K) 


I— 1 




00 


NO 


o 


<£> 


to 


CM 


Cn 


1—1 


to 


ON 




Cn 


to 


v — t 




h- ' 


O 




H- 














































to 


4 




3 

O 










































o 


— 


ON 


</) 




I—" 










































T\ 


tn 




rt 




c 








































1—1 




po 




P 




Qu 


























1— ' 




t— > 


h- ' 


(—1 




CM 


o 


H 






rt 




CD 


i— ■ 


1— ■ 


NJ 


O 


Cn 


-J 








(SJ 


NJ 


-J 


o 


to 


00 


NJ 


-~J 




o 


o 


O 


cn 




CD 




CL 










































H 


cn 




a- 




H- 


I— < 


Cn 


On 


to 


4^ 


oo 




00 


'-D 


CM 


\D 


o 


h- 1 


i — i 


cn 


NJ 


tO 




t—> 


o 


> 


z 

H 




^ 




3 
















































CD 




















































P 




3 








































■fee- 


, — s 






4 




CD 






























i—i 








I— 1 


4^ 


-&e- 






t/3 




ri- 






i — i 


i—" 


K) 


CM 








>— ' 


t— ' 


CM 


CM 


4^ 


t— > 


4^ 


CO 




NJ 


Cn 


I—" 






• 




CD 


J5» 


CA 


NJ 


CO 


ON 


~-a 




( 


/ 


o 


NO 


o 


K) 


O 


cn 


NJ 


~-J 




to 


4^ 


o 










X 


^1 


cn 


NJ 


ON 


<£> 


4^. 




M 


|vj 


cn 


I 1 


h— 1 


Cn 


Cn 


cn 


4i» 


4i» 




oo 


ON 


o 










n3 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 




» — ' 


* — ' 


3 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 




o 


O 


o 










CD 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








O 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


1 — ' 




1 — 1 






3 














































to 






CL 














































ON 






h" 










































o 


"0 


o 






rt 










































TTJ 


rr- 








c 








































1— ' 




— 








4 






























NJ 




I— 1 




NJ 


o 


H 










CD 


I—" 


t— ' 


NJ 


J> 


Cn 


00 




t — ^ 


, — ^ 


K) 


INJ 


ON 


-~J 


oo 


Cn 


to 


VO 




CO 


o 


O 


cn 








iyi 
















ro 


K) 
























H 


tn 










o 


4S> 


-J 


H 


<£> 


1 








CM 


^J 


ON 


i— i 


to 


4=» 


CM 


NJ 




On 


o 


> 
i— 1 


Z 
H 

i — i 


T3 

tn 








I— 1 


NJ 


nj 


NJ 


(— ' 






K) 


K) 


1 — l 


CM 


INJ 


i—i 


CM 




1 — 1 


4^ 




CM 


I— 1 


to 


l£J 


pa 








-J 


-J 


NJ 


i— • 


Cn 


Cn 




o 


K) 


On 


o 


CM 


cn 


»%4 


to 


oo 


cn 




4^ 


oo 


ON 

CO 


On 


n 








ON 


00 


*. 


CM 


ON 


O 




K) 


Cn 




I— 1 


cn 


O 


4^ 

I— • 


Cn 


ON 

NJ 


4^. 
t— ■ 




cn 

i— • 


to 

I—I 


I— 1 


i — i 


tn 
z 

H 

cn 








■P* 


»J 


CM 


ON 


(— ' 


00 




, — , 


, — , 


w 


cc 


On 


K) 


CO 


ON 


I— 1 


-J 




00 


CM 


to 


lO 


5" 








£» 


On 


NJ 


ON 


I— 1 


1 — 1 




1— ' 


i— 1 


CO 


w 


t-O 


Cn 


CM 


i—i 


NJ 


CM 




ON 


to 


ON 

00 




z 








NJ 


w 


M 


oo 


1— ' 


1 — 1 








00 


to 


tsj 


ON 


to 


i — i 


CM 


CM 




o 


Cn 




^ 


cn 
tn 



154- 



FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

The number of active banks of all types in Maryland decreased by nearly 
eight per cent, to a total of 128, between 1960 and 1967. Mergers of smaller 
banks into larger institutions are primarily responsible for this decrease, al- 
though the period 1965-1968 has shown a new gain in numbers (from 111 to 128). 
Total assets or liabilities increased from 1960 to 1968 by nearly 84 per cent. 
The greater change occurred in national banks as compared to the state banks. 
While the number of state banks dropped in absolute terms from 50 to 48, their 
total assets or liabilities rose 102.6 per cent. 

During the same time period industrial finance companies increased by 42 
per cent (257 to 365), and their total assets or liabilities rose 146.9 per cent 
to an amount in excess of $328 million. Meanwhile credit unions decreased from 

43 to 37 in number, a decrease of 14 per cent. Total assets or liabilities of 

» 

the credit unions in 1967 stood at more than $48 million, an increase of 105.6 

n 
per cent since 1960. 

I 
The number of building, savings, and loan associations in Maryland de- 
creased from 310 at the end of 1967 to 295 a year later. Of these associations 

i 

active at the end of 1968, 87 were either federally chartered or were State 
chartered with federal insurance, 155 were State chartered with Maryland Savings 
Share Insurance Corporation insurance, and only 67 are State chartered uninsured 
associations . 

Nearly $2,400,000,000 in mortgage loans were outstanding as of December 
31, 1968 by the associations in Maryland, a 6.7 per cent increase from the year 
prior. Similarly, total assets increased to over $2,800,000,000, representing a 
6.4 per cent increase. 



155 



NO. 122 



ALL ACTIVE BANKS IN MARYLAND, 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES:- 1968 AND 1960 
(MONEY FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS AS OF DEC. 31) 



ITEM 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including 

Mortgages $ Judgments 

U. S. Government and other 

Securities 

Cash § Balances with other 

Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 
Capital Stock, Surplus, 
Undivided Profits, § 
Reserves 

Total Deposits 



128 


139 


-7.9 


6,204 


$3,377 


83.7 


3,441 


1,504 


128.8 


1,663 


1,241 


34.0 


865 


532 


62.6 



507 
5,512 



277 
3,051 



83.0 

80.7 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Ninth Annual Report," 1969, and 
"Fifty-First Annual Report," 1961. U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, 
"Annual Report," 1968, and "Annual Report," 1961. 



-156- 



NO. 123 ALL ACTIVE NATIONAL BANKS IN MARYLAND, 

SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1968, 1960 
(MONEY FIGURES IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS AS OF DEC. 31) 



ITEM 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets : 

Total Loans, Including 

Mortgages 5 Judgments 

U. S. Government and other 

Securities 

Cash & Balances with other 

Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 
Capital Stock, Surplus, 
Undivided Profits, S, 
Reserves 
Total Deposits 
Demand 
Time (including savings) 



48 
$2,581 

1,300 
658 
510 



196 

2,280 

1,371 

909 



50 

$1,274 

510 
458 
285 



99 

1,160 
847 
314 



-4.0 
102.6 

154.9 
43.7 
78.9 



98.0 

96.6 

61.9 

189.5 



Sources: U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, "Annual Report," 1968, 
U. S. Comptroller of the Currency, "Annual Report," 1960 



157- 



NO. 124 



ALL ACTIVE STATE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES IN MARYLAND 



SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1968 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions) 






ITEM 



1968 



1960 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets : 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages £ 

Judgments 
U. S. Gov't. § Other Securities 
Cash § Balances with Other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus Undivided Profits 

$ Reserves 
Total Deposits 



242 
2,414 



124 
1,330 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



74 


83 


- 10.9 


$2,725 


$1,477 


84.5 


1,547 


665 


132.6 


768 


553 


38.9 


339 


232 


46.1 



95.2 
81.5 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner , "Fifty-Ninth Annual Report," 1969. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-First Annual Report," 1961. 



NO. 125 



ALL ACTIVE MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS IN MARYLAND, 
SUMMARY OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES: 1968 AND 1960 
(Money figures in millions) 



ITEM 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Number of Banks 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 

Total Loans, Including Mortgages $ 

Judgments 
U. S. Gov't. § Other Securities 
Cash £ Balances in Other Banks 

Selected Liabilities: 

Surplus, Undivided Profits § Reserves 
Total Deposits 





6 




6 


$ 


898 


$ 


626 




594 




329 




237 




238 




16 




15 




69™ 




54 




818 




561 



NC 
43.5 



80.5 

.4 

6.7 

27.8 
45.8 



(1) 



Includes $41,230,000 of surplus or guaranty fund. 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Ninth Annual Report," 1969 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-First Annual Report," 1961 



158- 



NO. 126 CREDIT UNIONS IN MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1960 

(Money figures in millions) 



ITEM 



Number of Credit Unions 

Total Assets or Liabilities 

Selected Assets: 
Loan to Members 
Cash (On hand and in banks) 
Securities 

Selected Liabilities: 

Paid in Shares, Reserve Funds § Surplus 
Deposits 







PER 


CENT CHANGE 


1968 


1960 


1960/1968 


37 


43 




14.0 


48.1 


$ 23.4 




105.6 


42.7 


19.5 




119.0 


1.0 


.9 




11.1 


1.9 


1.8 




5.6 


40.9 


20.3 




101.5 


3.6 


1.2 




200.0 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Ninth Annual Report," 1969. 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-First Annual Report," 1961. 



NO. 127 INDUSTRIAL FINANCE COMPANIES IN MARYLAND: 1968 AND 1960 

(Money figures in millions) 



ITEM 



Number of Licensees 

Total Assets or Liabilities £ Capital 

Selected Assets : 

Total Loans Receivable 
Cash (On hand and in banks) 

Selected Liabilities: 

Capital Stock, Surplus, Undivided Profits, 

& Reserves 

Deferred Income 

Due Home Office, Holding Company or 

Affiliates 

Notes Payable (Banks and others) 







PER CENT CHANGE 


1968 


1960 


1960/1968 


365 


257 


42.0 


$328.1 


$132.9 


146.9 


314.6 


124.3 


153.1 


6.6 


4.0 


65.0 



31.8 


20.1 


58.2 


29.9 


7.8 


283.3 


216.8 


81.6 


165.7 


37.1 


20.2 


83.7 



Sources: Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-Ninth Annual Report," 1969 
Maryland State Bank Commissioner, "Fifty-First Annual Report," 1961 



-159- 





O- 

CD 
4 
P 



cn 

P 
< 

>-■• 

3 
OQ 
W 

P 



=1 
in 

3 

P 

o 

fD 

n 
o 

4 

*3 
o 

4 
P 
rt 

M- 

o 

3 



CM 



T1 
CD 
D-. 
CD 
4 
P 



o 

3 

fD 

o 

3 
W 



-a 


en 


co 


73 


cn 


en 


a 


o 


S 


r- 


O 


ti co 


> 


03 


c 


3 


fD 


c 


~3 


CD 


rt 


o 


o 


rf 


n 03 


00 


H- 


p 


4 


W 


3 


o 


Hi 


3 d 


4 


3 


y 


r- < 


>— H 


CL 


4 


nd 


fD 


CD 


n 


fD 


CD 


rt 


3 


fD 


CO H- 


t— 




p 


t— ■ 


4 


4 


H- 


4 


4 


era 


in 


4 


3 


1 — 1 


H- 


3 


C 


< 


03 


Hi 


4 




03 






>fra 


H 


3 


r-+ 


W 


fD 


1— i 


H- 


CD 


t - ' (X 


H- 


03 


CL m 


1— 1 




*•< 








O 


CL 


H- 


fD 


3 


o 


< 


cn 


co 




£n 


Hi 


1— 






03 






4 


03 n 


co 


c 


CO 




O 


o 


pa 


n 


— 


m 


T3 


4 


3 03 




4 


rt 


C 


4 


in 


CD 


4 


H- 


X 


4 


o 


o '-a 


jjra 


n3 


O 


3 




in 


in 


o 


i — i 


nd 


C 


£ 


fD H- 




i— 1 


n 


P- 


n 




fD 


a 


H- 


fD 


n 


fD 


in rt 


n 


c 


■7s- 


H- 


o 


TO 


4 


H- 


rt 


3 


fD 


Cl 


T^p 


T> 


in 




< 


3 


fD 


< 


rt 


p. 


l/> 


l/l 




CM ,_, 


~1 






H" 


rt 


W 


CD 


W 


CD 


fD 


in 


f? 


* — ' 


i — 1 






CL 


H- 


CD 


C/) 




W 






o 




H 






fD 


3 


4 








> 




3 




> 






Cl era 


< 








O 




fD 




rt 1 








CD 


CD 








o 




*■< 










n3 


3 


I/) 








o 














4 


O 










3 














O 


H- 










3 














t-h 


fD 










r+ 














H- 


t/J 










in 











45. -p. 

si 00 M W 



in 


4- 


In 


ID 'X) 


O 45. On 


4- 


cm Os c 


00 en 


IsJ 


i— 1 


K) si 


in w in lO 


o 


cm t— ' - 


K) s] 


co 


CM 


45. OO 


O On 00 O 


in 


O On l- 



NJ IS) 

CM 00 

W W si M C^ OO H 

O O oo ro in oo O 



IS)l— 'iDts)lMls>tS)>— 'O 

C^HNj^Olnwww 

hh'j:iowsi«3^h 



ID O O 00 45. 
45. in O 45. O 

W NJ O Ifl 00 



ts_> O 
00 OS O 



OS sO 
h is) O^ h in lO oo 
cm o o o is) cm oo 



l— ' lO 00 Os 
Qs Os CM <D 
Os O Is) IS) 



4i H O IS) s| O 00 
O O O Js, W H (Jl 

isj in o o in K) oo 



o o in id 

CM 00 IS) 00 

K) W O s| 



si ID ID O O O CM 
45. in cn o O oo in 
3 si CM O O in si 







(sj 




00 


l—" 


00 




\# 


\« 


\* 




o 


in 


o 


•D 


Os 


in 


id 


ID 


o^ 


CM 


45. 


CM 


Os 


1— ' 


CM 


1 — i 


si 


OS 


45. 


o> 


Os 


Os 


o 


•D 



CM 0> 45- K) 



Ji. in 
i— ' os 45. 
NJ ID 'D 



Isj CM 'D in en ID I— • 
'D si 'D <D UD si CM 
Os CM On Os Cn <J\ ID 



O t— • si O O si <D 
CM O O O O CM K> 
t— ■ in in o O CM in 

























-s> 






















hO 


I j 








1 — 1 














o 


4- 






ID 


|sj 






CM 


CM 


K) 


oo 


o 


O 






v# 


\# 






te 


* 


^ 


w 


V* 


v 




s] 


hJ 


45. 






1— ' 


4-. 


Os 


CM 


oo 


'D 


1 


CM 


h- • 


IM 


00 


1 


IM 


<D 


45. 


ON 


45. 


ON 




00 


O 


s] 


ID 




Os 


CM 


Os 


^D 


I— 1 


ISJ 




in 


in 


O 


00 




O 


o 


cn 


45. 


s] 


00 




oo 


CM 


si 


<D 




o 


y— • 


Isj 


I — ' 


ID 


CM 




O 


si 

h- ■ 


isj 

K- 1 


Cs 




NJ 


Isj 


ID 


45. 

I— 1 


On 

isj 

45. 


CO 

CM 

1 — i 




00 


CM 


cn 


isj 




1— ' 


45. 


CM 


1 — I 


si 


t—' 


X 


1 — 1 


00 


OS 


o 


cn 


45. 


00 


00 


<D 


00 


o 


isj 


oo 


in 


O 


CM 


o 


1 — i 


in 


o> 


ID 


Os 


o 


(sj 


in 


Os 


45. 


|SJ 


Isj 


CM 


lO 


s] 


ON 


isj 


1 J 


a- 


CM 


oo 


IM 


o 


CM 


in 


in 


cn 


IM 


CM 


00 


i — i 


i — i 


45. 


IM 


CM 


ID 


i — i 


si 


Os 


00 


in 


00 































> 






























:/i 


o 


o 


a 


Tl 


CJ 


n 


pa 


pa 


o 


CD 


C 


CO CO 


C3 


<" 


r n 


CD 


r+ 


fD 


C 


Hi 


03 


o 


CD 


r+ 


4 


• 


rt p 


3 


o 


m 


^3 


3" 


i-h 


3 


H-, 


[/) 


03 


03 


3 


o 




O < 


I/) 


4 


H 


o 


CD 


CD 


H- 


3- 


t— ■ 


1 — 1 


fD 


3 


cn 


O H- 


fD 


rt 


r /-/ 


I/) 


4 


4 


H- 


o 








4 


3 


• 


?n- 3 


O 


era 




H- 




4 


n- 


fD 


O 


cn 


m 




a 




era 


3 


P 




r-f 


> 


CD 


3 




3 


i/> 


in 


i — i 




CD 


h- in 


4 


era 




7) 


W 


Cl 


4 


CD 




ri- 


rt 


3 


pa 


O 


3 


fD 


fD 






t/1 




fD 


3 


5C 


03 


3 


< 


o 


< 


> 


d 






I 


fD 


n 




H- 


03 


rt 


rt 


CD 


3 


— 


T] O 




i— 






rt 


3 J 


•Cri 


i — i 


3 


fD 


fD 


in 


rt 


rt 


-r. o 


I— 


o 




!s£ 


w 


03 




C 


el- 






r-t 


in 


• 


tr o 


O 


P 




cn 




4 


-n 


H- 


's^ 


CO 


O 


3 






03 c 


3 


3 




CO 




n 


^> 


3 


H- 


o 


? 


CD 


C 


O 


/— s^ 


3 


in 




i — i 




fD 


X 


00 


3 


1 — 1 


3 


3 


£ 


CT 


Wrt 


in 






n 




in 


c 


l/l 


ca 


C- 


fD 


rt 
l/i 


3 
fD 


I— 1 


C^ 














4 


1 


03 


o 






p- era 


o 














CD 




3 


3 








P 


P3 














l/l 
1 


2 

fD 

rt 


7- 


n 

o 

3 








rt 

o 

3 


3 
in 














z 






rt 








in 
















CD 






4 
























r+ 






05 
O 
rt 

















































-&<3- 
































K) 


K) 
































V» 


vc 
























i—" 








W 


oo 






K) 






CM 


ON 








45. 


in 


isj 


(NJ 


NJ 


00 


H- ' 




CM 


in 




s] 


1 — i 


00 




45> 


ID 


CM 


45. 


CM 


W 


CM 


sD 


o 


H 


00 


ON 




cn 


3 


oo 


ID 


CM 


si 


1— • 


O 


CM 


cr 


ID 


Isj 


o 


O 


Os 


00 


CO 


t— > 


|Nj 


ON 


s] 


I— 1 


CO 


o 


s] 


Cn 


o> 


a> 


o 


si 


-, 


45. 


On 


O 


O 


o 


45. 


1 — 1 


ON 


4> 


cn 


si 


|NJ 


K3 


in 


00 


1— ' 


> 
t— 



si CM On CM CM 45. I— 1 

O K) O Cn ID O O 
O Isj I— ' 00 00 Os I— ' 



I— 'iniDsjONH- ' s] Cn 45, 
CncM45.CMs]0N00K)O 
t— 'ONCni— 'IDOOlOslOO 



|sj 

O 

CM 

sj I 
si 

CM 

oo 

45. 



s] 
si I 



OS 
|sj 
CM 



NJ 

Os I — i 



45. 

'D 



IS) M M 

NJ 00 si OS 00 



On ID 
I— 1 I— 1 00 00 
Cn on 45. oo 



i— '!DCncns]45.CMCncM ONslinoo 

45.45.CmOIDCm45.CMK> I— ' CM si On 

45.CMCnlD|sJlDl— '45-00 IsJOOOOO 

|sjK)ON<DCMl— 'CnONOs CMs]45.CM 

OOCn45.CM00'DOO iniDooln 

CMNJOsONOOslOOslO I— ' 00 s] s] 



ON 



I— ' CM 

i— ' O I— ' 



45. in 

Os 45. 

in 45. -~j cn ID 



OOsllsj WWsllOO HWmh 

45.s]45.00"D45.'D<Di— ' slCMlnCM 

OOONI— 'OOOoCncMt— i ON 045.0NIO 

sllMCncntsjCMCnlDCn CnD45.'D 

t— 'CM0NtsjO45.CMCMsl slDOsisj 

lsj^j45.0iDlOOONCn cn — • Cn in 



oo oo 

ON 45. 

45. CM 



I— • On 

cm oo id i— 1 in 

45. ID Os 45. <D 

ISJ Isj 00 45. tsj 



•b<5- 

IsJ NJ 

I- 1 45. 

45. in CM CM O 

in cm CM O <D 

O 45. On I ID ON 

tsj |sj si in in NJ 



s] <D 

O 45. 
O Os 



ID ON On O Isj 
On CM •— ' ID O 
s] ID in 00 CM 



Isj h- ' 45. t— ' NJ Os 

00 00 si O H Is) W 
si O 45. 00 00 00 IM 



Os 'D 
45. OS 
45. CM 



45. 00 

OS O 
00 OO 



Cn CM 

O Os 
O 00 



t- 1 00 
ID CM 
cn oo 



■fee- 
isj cm 

On ►— ' 

CM h- ' 
s] O 
00 o 



CX) ON 45. Is) in I/I 45, t— . nj 00 CMtsJ 

CmOsIInJsIImO si Is) si 0000 

O )— ' On O I— ' sl I— ' CMln 45. O 00 



i— i -n 

z co 

CO r- 

a (-i 

pa n 

cn r- 

o >- 



> 

co 

CO 

O 
n 
i— i 
> 
H 
i— i 
O 

CO 

a 
o 



n 

i — i 
c- 
m 
a 



> 

pa 
-< 

c- 
> 

a 



a 
cn 
n 

cn 

CO 

cn 
pa 



ID 
On 

oo 



z: co 

CO CO 

pa n 

cn ^—s 

O NJ 



o 



-160- 



H 
Z 

W 
u 

to c 
< 

u 

a 



o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° 
1/5 h- vO <J I/) h- 



H \Q ^O ^O ^ H 



cm 



o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° 
O CTl vD (M H 



N L/5 \D vO N 



o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° 
CM LO CM O ^O 00 



to r-- r-- r^- \o t^ 



o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° o\° 

tj- cm r-- to cti r~» 



to -^- CM -—I 



UJ 

to 

< 

UJ 
CC 

U H 

o 



*3- cti cm to lo 
O oo Cti cm \D 

CO CTl LT) CTl ^ 



ct, 


CO 


CO r-l 


P-- 


00 


C 


to to 


i — i 


1 — 1 


CM 


LO v£> 


o 



\D to CM ^J- 

O (M O 



L0 



tO t-~- LO <3" CM 

cm to r- oo cti 

lo ^h r— CTi o 

*3- cm \£> cm ^D 

oo oo Cti cm r- 

tO vO O 1^ ■— I 

*V #\ #N #\ 

O O CTl i-H 

to to r\i 



1^ 00 LO o to 

vO \D CTi "^ CTl 

tJ- to tO vO CM 

i—> CM vD t^ i— I "3" 

l/) O N N N ^ 

^Ol tM H N \D 

■* \£> to 



0O N N vD O 

vD CTl ^r 00 CTl 

n o oo h n 

/— n CTi vD i— I ^ "3" 

ct lo r-~ cm i— i oo 

v — ' i—i oo to 



CTi 



to oo to o r^ 

00 \C CTi 00 \D 
\D to ^t \D LO 



vD 00 


CTi 


to o 


00 


^D 00 


LO 


r^ vo 


•xf 


to 


\0 


^r --h 


1—1 



00 LO o to to 
t~- vO CTl O CM 

LO 00 LO <—\ 



(N 00 CO (N t 
"* 00 LO CM 00 

CTi r~^ CTi LO LO 



CM r— 1 


t^ 


CT. 


•** 


O 


cm r~- 


L0 


r^ 


CM 


CTi 


r-< 


^s- 


CO 


CTi 


Tf 



tO i—l rt CM 
<3" LO ^J" 



00 O ■— I CM *3" 
CM r-~. O tO rt 

r-- ^j- •D- "d- cm 



LO CM 


vO 


"3- 


LO 


vO 


LO CTi 


CO 


vO 


o 


■*r 


i—l i—l 


-c 


O 


CT 


LO 



oo ^t- r^ 

CTi CM 00 
i— I CM i— t 



00 



00ON N^ 
-* CO 00 ^ N 
t— I tO O CM O 



1^. 


oo 


vO 


cc 


vO 


o 


sO 


to 


t~» 


o 


"3" 


r~- 




LO 


CT. 


1—1 


LO 


^r 



r^- i— i lo 

CM tO CM 



00 

CT) 



r-~ r-- lo to cm 

oo LO oo o to 

■3- to o ^o o 



ri- oo to t^ oo 

00 CO CTi O CM 

vD CTi \0 ' — i 



&e- 



LO LO tO vO vD 
\Q CM tO O t~-« 
•^t CTi r-~ LO \D 



LO CO 00 


CM 


CM 


^D 


CM \D CTi 


>D 


r^ 


^o 


\D N vD 


- — i 


CT. 


^O 


CM LO tO 


r- 


rj- 


\d 


LO 00 


o 


r-- 


i—i 


I— 1 i— 1 


CT. 


\o 


v£> 



LO CTi CTi CT CO 
\D ^ vO CM 

^t W t 



lo oo vo cm r^ 

CTi to CTi t^ to 

i— i oo r-- o lo 



c 


LO 


CM i— 1 


r- 


o 


LO 


CT, 


vD ^ 


to 


i-H 


i-H 


c 


CTi 00 


^ 


CM 



tO O O CM CTi 
i— ( "3" O i— i 
CM CM CM 



O CO LO to "3- 

00 oo to to 00 

tO CM CM ■*}■ vO 

00 00 O vD O LO 

in N O CO vD oo 

tO i— I 1^ LO to 

»\ #S #\ »s *\ 

vO i— i ^d" i— i i— i 

CM tO CM 



03 
fn 
O 
PX 

S 

o 
u 



o 

I-H 

< 

I-H 
U 

o 
to 
to 
< 

o 

— 
a. 
>• 
E- 



o 

o 

!/i 

< 

0) 

fH 


■M 

fn 
aj 
X 
U 



U 

-a 













LH 












O 


0) 










fH 


c 










a. 


o 












• H 










T3 


4- 1 










a) 


C3 










-a 


•H 










■ H 


O 






1—1 




> 





t« 




rt 




•H 


(/) 


c 




+-> 




T3 


</) 


^3 


L0 


■ H 




C 


< 


O 


■M 


Ph 




3 




_1 


(U 


rt 






«4-l 




L0 


U 




US' 


O 


CD 


t/5 




L0 






bi <C 


L0 


cu 


if) 


fn 


as 




M 


> 


3 


CD 


M 


i—l 


C 


h 


i-H 


X 


4^ 


nj 


■H 


o 


Ph 


e 


u 


•M 


> 


L0 


fn 


3 


o 


o 


as 


03 


3 



E-i to cc to 



u 
o 



«4H 

o 

u 
a, 

0) 

T3 

•H 

-I > 



L0 OS L0 -H 
< O +J 






UJ 



a, 

L0 U 

a> t/j to 

M< J) 0) l/l 

b£ > 3 

H CD Dh 

> L0 ?H 

aS CU 3 



M-i 
O 



H aS 

0) bo i-h 
,0 4-j aS 

e ^ 4-> 
o o 



2 S f- CO Di to 



[-< 




4^ 




■ H 




S 


L0 




4-> 


10 


3 


3 


3 


O 


O 


■ H 


o 


4-> 


o 


a5 < 


•H 




O M-l 


O 


o 


'71 




L0 


a; 


< 


o 




3 


-CT 


as 


a; 


Jh 


h 


3 


0) 


if) 


4-J 


3 


^ 


t— i 


^3 




X 


— \ 


u 


— i 


>»_/ 


<D 


U 


4-J 


i — i 


nj 


to 


+J 


to 


■j~i 


2 



o 

o 

10 

L0 

< 

o 



aS 



LO 

4-> 

•H 

tw 
o 

a. 

(D 

T3 



?-i aS 
CD oi 



Xi 4-> 



3 4-J 

B 1/1 id 
O 4-> P* 
-1 CD aS 
lo U 
CD CO LO 

M <; L0 CD L0 

00 > 

3 



as 
U 
O O 



4-J > 



-CT 
C 



3 
U i-i 
CD fO, 
L0 ?H 



aS OD 3 



*-h Z S E- to CC to 



-CT 






f-l 




3 




L0 




c 




1—) 




c 




o 




2 




-CT 




CD 




U 




CD 


L0 


+J 


3 


f-l 


O 


rt 


•H 


X 


4-J 


u 


aS 




•H 


(D 


O 


4^ 


o 


C3 


L0 


4-1 


L0 


C^> 


< 



L0 

3 
O 

•H 
4-> 

as 



O lo aS 

lo 3 +-> 

lo aS L0 -H 

< O 4J ft 

J J) B 

4-t L0 U 

O CD L0 



<4-4 
O 

Cu 

T3 
CD 



T3 
3 



uJ 



L^ 



fn OS 
CD 60 



bo ■< L0 CD L0 

Wj > 3 



+j aS 

^1 4-1 

o o 



L0 f-l 

aS CD 3 



H to Di to 



CD 
(J 

3 
ri 

'r4 

3 

LO 

3 




aS 

to 

i 

LO 

bO 

3 

•H 
> 

aS 

to 

13 
3 
as 

i-H 

u 

as 



161- 



NO. 130 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, ALL STATE CHARTERED AND FEDERAL CHARTERED 

BUILDING, SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS: DECEMBER 31, 1968, DECEMBER 31, 1967 













ABSOLUTE 


PER 


CENT 


ITEM 




1968 


1967 


CHANGE 


CHANGE 


Number of Associations 




295 


310 


- 15 


- 


4.8 


Mortgage Loans 


$2 


389,208,527 


$2,238,891,501 


$150,317,026 




6.7 


Total Assets 


2 


,810,071,408 


2,640,780,006 


169,291,402 




6.4 


Savings Capital 


2 


,388,616,849 


2,244,125,934 


144,490,915 




6.4 


Reserves 




151,437,613 


144,296,881 


7,140,732 




4.9 


Surplus and Undivided 














Profits 




47,428,929 


41,655,469 


5,773,460 




13.9 



Source: Unpublished data provided by the Maryland Department of Building, Savings 
and Loan Associations. 



162- 



LIFE INSURANCE 

The strength of the Maryland economy is again evident in the 
field of life insurance. Nearly $1,800,000,000 of ordinary life insur- 
ance was purchased in Maryland during 1968. This figure represents a 
ten per cent increase from the prior year and a 47.7 per cent increase 
since 1964. 

When all types of life insurance are considered, Marylanders 
held nearly seven million policies with an in force valuation in ex- 
cess of twenty-two billion dollars. The average amount in force per 
family in Maryland stood at $18,900 during 1968, representing an increase 
of 103.2 per cent since 1958. Maryland's average is therefore some- 
what above the national average of $18,400 of life insurance in force. 



163- 



NO. 131 



LIFE INSURANCE IN FORCE IN MARYLAND: 1968 



CD 



TYPE 



NUMBER OF POLICIES 
(1,000) 



AMOUNT 
($1,000,000) 



Total 

Ordinary 
Group 
Industrial 
Credit 



6,970 

2,115 
1,148 
2,303 
1,404 



$ 22,176 

11,672 
8,320 
1,055 
1,129 



Average amount in force per family $18,900 (103.2 per cent increase since 1958) 

Includes group credit. 

Source: Institute of Life Insurance, "Life Insurance Fact Book, 1969," p. 21, 
p. 24. 



NO. 132 



PURCHASES OF ORDINARY LIFE INSURANCE, MARYLAND: 1964-1968 



YEAR 



AMOUNT PURCHASED 



PER CENT CHANGE 
YEAR TO YEAR 



PER CENT CHANGE 
YEAR TO 1964 



1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 



1,798,000,000 
1,635,000,000 
1,466,000,000 
1,398,000,000 
1,217,000,000 



10.0 

11.5 

4.9 

14.9 



47.7 
34.3 
20.5 
14.9 



Source: Institute of Life Insurance, "Life Insurance Fact Book, 1969," p. 16 



164- 



MASS MEDIA 

There are two major market centers for the mass media in the State, as 
well as several smaller ones. These are, of course, the metropolitan Baltimore 
and the metropolitan Washington, D. C. markets. 

Sixteen daily papers, including three designated as Washington, D. C. 
publications serve the State, and five more publish twice weekly. In addition, 
there are many weekly newspapers put out throughout the State. 

As of the beginning of 1970, there were seven television stations on the 
air in Maryland, with two more scheduled to commence operations in the Fall of 
the year. In addition, there are six stations on the air from Washington, D. C. 

which serve many viewers in Maryland. » 

m 

One of the stations in Maryland is noncommercial, as is one operating > 



from Washington. However, the noncommercial channel in Maryland, with the call 
letters WMPB, is a state operated station, with the Maryland Public Broadcasting 
Commission being the licensee. Eventually the Commission will operate seven 
channels throughout the State. In addition to the facility existing presently 
near Baltimore, the second station in the network is planning to commence broad- 
casting in the Fall of 1970 at Salisbury. For adequate statewide coverage ad- 
ditional transmitters are planned for Annapolis, Cumberland, Frederick, Hagers- 
town, and Waldorf. 

Beside its potential range, the commercial television channel on the 
Eastern Shore has its range augmented by use of cable subscription, and the com- 
mercial channel operating from Hagerstown has its range expanded to reach the 
surrounding Pennsylvania and West Virginia areas as well as the Maryland 
viewers due to the many homes subscribing to cable services in that market. 

Maryland radio listeners have their choice of 52 AM stations as well as 
several Washington, D. C. outlets which reach the State's residents. In addition 



165- 



' 



to these stations, there are 31 FM stations located in Maryland, and, again 
these are additional facilities emanating from the District of Columbia. These 
FM stations cover the broad range from simultaneous programming with AM af- 
filiates to partial simelcasting to independent operations. 

The communications facilities are thus well represented in the State, 
and Maryland's citizens have broad latitude and availabilities among the printed 
and electronic media. 






-166- 



NO. 133 



TELEVISION STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1970 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 



CHANNEL 



YEAR 
ESTABLISHED 



00 (V) 
UHF OR VHF 



Baltimore 



WBAL 


11 


WBFF 


45 


WJZ 


13 


WMAR 


2 


WMET 


24 


WMBP 


67 



1948 
1970 
1948 
1947 
1967 
1969 



(2) 



CD 



V 

u 

V 
V 

u 
u 



Hagerstown 
Salisbury 



WHAG 

WBOC 
WCPB 



25 

16 
28 



1969 



1954 
1970 



CD (2) 



u 

u 
u 



(1) 



(2) 



Noncommercial. 



Scheduled to be on air in Fall, 1970, 



Source: Reprinted by permission, BROADCASTING YEARBOOK, 1735 De Sales Street, N. W. , 
Washington, D. C. 20036. 



-167- 



NO. 134 



AM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1970 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 


KILOCYCLES 


ESTABLISHED 


WAMD 


970 


1957 


WANN 


1190 


1947 


WNAV 


1430 


1949 


WYRE 


810 


1946 


WAYE 


860 


1955 


WBAL 


1090 


1925 


WBMD 


750 


1947 


WCAO 


600 


1922 


WCBM 


680 


1924 


WEBB 


1360 


1955 


WFBR 


1300 


1922 


WITH 


1230 


1941 


WSID 


1010 


1947 


WWIN 


1400 


1951 


WVOB 


1520 


1963 


WGMS 


570 


1946 


WUST 


1120 


1949 


WMHI 


1370 


1960 


WTRI 


1520 


1966 


WCEM 


1240 


1947 


WCTR 


1530 


1963 


WCUM 


1230 


1948 


WTBO 


1450 


1928 


WUOK 


1270 


1953 


WEMD 


1460 


1960 


WSER 


1550 


1963 


WFMD 


930 


1936 


WFRB 


560 


1958 


WHMC 


1150 


1962 


WISZ 


1590 


1963 


WARK 


1490 


1947 


WJEJ 


1240 


1932 


WHAG 


1410 


1962 


WASA 


1330 


1948 


WSMD 


1560 


1965 


WLMD 


900 


1965 



Aberdeen 
Annapolis 

Baltimore 



Bel Air 
Bethesda 

Braddock Heights 

Brunswick 

Cambridge 

Chestertown 

Cumberland 

Easton 

Elkton 

Frederick 

Frostburg 

Gaithersburg 

Glen Burnie 

Hagerstown 

Halfway 

Havre De Grace 
La Plata 
Laurel 



(continued on following page) 



-168- 



NO. 134 



AM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1970 (Cont'd) 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 



KILOCYCLES 



ESTABLISHED 



Leonardtown 
Lexington Park 
Morningside 
Oakland 
Ocean City 
Pocomoke City 
Potomac 
Rockville 
Salisbury 

Silver Spring 

Thurmont 

Towson 

Westminster 

Wheaton 



WKIK 

WPTX 

WPGC 

WMSG 

WETT 

WDMV 

WXLN 

WINX 

WBOC 
WICO 

WQMR 

WTHU 

WTOW 

WTTR 

WDON 



1370 

920 

1580 

1050 

1590 

540 

950 

1600 

960 
1320 

1050 

1450 
1570 
1470 
1540 



1953 
1953 
1954 
1963 
1960 
1955 
1965 
1951 

1940 

1957 

1946 

1967 
1955 
1953 
1954 



Source: Reprinted by permission, BROADCASTING YEARBOOK, 1735 DeSales Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



169- 



NO. 135 



FM RADIO STATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1970 



CITY 



CALL LETTERS 



MEGACYCLES 


ESTABLISHED 


107.9 


1960 


99.1 


1947 


97.9 


1958 


91.5 


1951 


102.7 


1947 


93.1 


1960 


104.3 


1949 


106.5 


1960 


95.1 


1964 


92.3 


1960 


101.9 


1960 


102.3 


1961 


94.7 


1959 


106.3 


1968 


105.7 


1963 


102.9 


1948 


106.1 


1962 


99.9 


1961 


105.3 


1965 


95.9 


1964 


106.9 


1957 


104.7 


1946 


96.7 


1965 


103.7 


1960 


104.1 


1965 


95.5 


1959 


92.1 


1963 


104.7 


1965 


94.3 


1969 


91.9 


1957 


100.7 


1959 



Annapolis 


WXTC 

WNAV 


Baltimore 


WBAL 




WBJC 
WCAO 
WFMM 
WITH 
WMAR 
WRBS 
WLPL 
WTOW 


Bethesda 


WHFS 
WJMD 


Cambridge 


WCEM 


Catonsville 


WBMD 


Cumberland 


WCUM 
WKGO 


Frederick 


WFMD 


Frostburg 


WFRB 


Glen Burnie 


WISZ 


Hag erst own 


WARK 
WJEJ 


Halfway 


WHAG 


Havre De Grace 


WASA 


La Plata 


WSMD 


Morningside 


WPGC 


Oakland 


WMSG 


Salisbury 


WBOC 
WICO 


Takoma Park 


WGTS 


Westminster 


WTTR 


Noncommercial. 





(1) 



(1) 



Source: Reprinted by permission, BROADCASTING YEARBOOK, 1735 DeSales Street, N. W, 
Washington, D. C. 20036 



170- 



). 136 TELEVISION BROADCAST REVENUES, EXPENSES AND INCOME ^ BY MARKET, 

BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON, D. C. : 1968 



ITEM BALTIMORE WASHINGTON, D. C, 

>. of Stations in Operation 4 6 

i. Reporting $25,000 or more Time Sales 4 6 

me Sales $ 21,283,927 $ 31,796,184 

Networks m 2,577,274 2,954,303 

National and Regional Advertising $ Sponsors 1 J 13,718,061 22,392,982 

Local Advertisers § Sponsors^ ^ 4,988,592 6,448,899 

tal Broadcast Revenues ^ 18,276,098 29,202,385 

tal Broadcast Expenses 11,378,440 22,057,177 

tal Broadcast Income*" 1 - 1 6,897,658 7,145,208 



) 
) 
) 

■urce: Federal Communications Commission, "TV Broadcast Financial Data - 1968" 
(PN35922) Table 15. 



Before federal taxes . * 

Before commissions. 

I 

Consists of total time sales less commissions plus talent and program sales. 

] 
ii 



171- 



NO. 137AM AND AM/FM BROADCAST REVENUES, EXPENSES AND INCOME, ^ MARYLAND AND BALTIMORE 

METROPOLITAN AREA: 1968 



ITEM 



STATE 



BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN . 



No. of Stations in Operation 

No. Reporting $25,000 or more Time Sales'- ' 

Time Sales 
Networks 

National § Regional Advertisers § Sponsors 
Local Advertisers $ Sponsors (*J 

Total Broadcast Revenues™) 

Total Broadcast Expenses 

Total Broadcast Income ^ 



(3) 



52 

51 

18,875,191 
124,403 

5,834,888 
12,915,900 
16,649,434 
14,158,503 

2,490,931 



19 

19 

$ 12,056,287 
100,369 
4,421,099 
7,534,819 
10,267,149 
8,538,500 
1,728,649 



Note: Independent FM Stations are not included. Included are AM stations and AM/FM stat 
(1) 



(2) 



Before federal taxes. 

Stations with less than $25,000 time sales report only total revenues and total expens 
Stations with total time sales of $25,000 or more, however, accounted for 99% of the 
broadcast revenues. 



Before commissions. 

^Consists of total time sales less commissions plus talent and program sales. 

Source: Federal Communications Commission, "AM-FM Broadcast Financial Data - 1968" 
(PN 39149), Tables 18 and 19. 



172- 



NO. 138 



DAILY NEWSPAPERS OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN MARYLAND 



(1) 



PLACE OF 
PUBLICATION 



Annapolis 
Baltimore 



Cambridge 
Cumberland 

Frederick 

Hagerstown 

Salisbury 
Washington, D.C, 



NAME OF 
PAPER 



DATE 
ESTABLISHED 



The Evening Capital 
(3) 



(2) 



The Sun 



(2) 



The Evening Sun 

The Baltimore News-American 
(2) 



(3) 



(2) 



The Daily Record 
The Daily Banner 



The Cumberland Daily News 



(2) 



The Cumberland Evening Times 

The Frederick Post^ } 
(2) 

(2) 



(3) 



The News 

The Daily Mail 



The Morning Herald 



(2) 



The Salisbury Daily Times 

The Washington Post*- * 

f3l 
The Evening Star 

The Daily News*- 2 -* 



(2) 



TIME OF 
ISSUE 



1884 


Evening 


1837 


Morning 


1910 


Evening 


1872 


Evening 


1888 


Morning 


1897 


Evening 


1870 


Morning 


1869 


Evening 


1910 


Morning 


1883 


Evening 


1828 


Evening 


1873 


Morning 


1923 


Evening 


1877 


Morning 


1852 


Evening 


1921 


Evening 



(1) 



(2) 
(3) 



In addition the Baltimore Afro American, Carroll County Times, Ellicott City 
Times, Montgomery County Sentinal and the Washington, D. C. Afro American 
are published twice weekly. These are the only newspapers serving the State 
published less frequently than daily but more frequently than weekly. 

No Sunday edition. 

Also publishes Sunday edition. 



-173- 



UTILITIES 

The need for energy has been increasing at a great rate. Installed 
electrical generating capacity in the State has increased nearly 85 per cent 
in the seven year period 1960-1967, with the largest share due to electric 
utilities. One of the State's major electric utilities has a nuclear powered 
electric generating plant under consideration for construction on the shores 
of the Chesapeake Bay. There are plans to build more nuclear plants in the 
future. Over 97 per cent of the electric utilities installed capacity is 
privately owned. 

Combined commercial and industrial electric sales in Maryland reached 
13,061,000,000 KWHR in 1969, an increase of 10.2 per cent over the 1968 sales 
and an increase since 1960 of 131.9 per cent. Industrial sales rose 10.1 per 
cent between 1968 and 1969 and 93.3 per cent over the 1960-1969 time period. 
Commercial sales increased 10.3 per cent over the previous year and 236.5 
per cent from 1960 to 1969. 

There has been a similar, if not as striking, demand for gas utility 
energy in the 1960-1967 time period. While the number of customers has in- 
creased 20 per cent, total revenues have increased by 56.3 per cent. This 
indicates strongly a per customer increase in gas usage as well as an increase 
in gas rates. 

The telephone continues to play an increasingly dominant role in 
communication. As of December 31, 1968, nearly 1,120,000 telephone accounts 
were in existence with over 2,100,000 telephones in use in the State. It is 
likely that future years will see continued expansion in telephone use, par- 
ticularly in the fields of retail selling and data processing, improved 
satellite international communication, and the advent of telephone-television 
combination. 



174- 



NO. 139 



GAS UTILITY INDUSTRY, CUSTOMERS AND REVENUES, MARYLAND 

1967 AND 1960 



YEAR AND 



(1) 



CUSTOMERS (1,000) 



(1) 



REVENUES ($1,000,000) 



(2) 



PER CENT 


TOTAL ^ 


RESI- 


COMMER- 


INDUS- 


TOTAL ^ 


RESI- 


COMMER- 


INDUS- 


CHANGE 


DENTIAL 


CIAL 


TRIAL 


DENTIAL 


CIAL 


TRIAL 


1967 


671 


624 


42 


4 


136 


92 


17 


26 


1960 


559 


522 


35 


2 


87 


65 


9 


13 


Per Cent 


















Change 


















1960/1967 


20.0 


19.5 


20.0 


100.0 


56.3 


41.5 


88.9 


100.0 



Annual Averages 



(2) 



(3) 



Excludes sales for resale 



Included "Other" service, not shown separately, 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1969," 

(90th Edition), Table 770, p. 520. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 1962," 

(83rd Edition), Table 728, p. 538. 



-175- 



NO. 140 INSTALLED GENERATING CAPACITY AND PRODUCTION OF ELECTRIC UTILITIES AND 
INSTALLED PLANTS BY CLASS OF OWNERSHIP AND TYPE OF PRIME MOVER, MARYLAND: 1967 AND 1960 

















CLASS OF OWNERSHIP 










TYPE 


OF PRIME 


MOVER 




OF ELECTRIC 


UTILITIES 




















PUBLICLY 










ELECTRIC UTILITIES ELECTRIC 
AND INDUSTRIAL UTILITIES ONLY 




PRI- 
VATELY 


OWNED 








MUNI- 




INDUS' 


ITEM 


TOTAL 


FUEL 


HYDRO 


FUEL 


HYDRO 


TOTAL 


OWNED 


CIPAL OTHER *-" 


PLAN* 


Installed 






















Capacity 
(000 KW) 
1967 


4,336 


3,842 


494 


3,607 


494 


4,101 


4,030 


63 


7 




1960 


2,349 


2,077 


272 


1,806 


271 


2,077 


2,015 


56 


7 




Per Cent 






















Change 






















1959/1967 


84.6 


85.0 


81.6 


99.7 


82.3 


97.4 


100.0 


12.5 


NC 


-1 


Production 






















(000,000 

KWH) 
1967 


22,441 


20,518 


1,923 


18,992 


1,923 


20,915 


20,709 


169 


36 


1, 


1960 


10,668 


9,311 


1,358 


7,884 


1,356 


9,240 


9,110 


.109 


21 


1, 


Per Cent 






















Change 
1959/1967 


110.4 


120.4 


41.6 


140.9 


41.8 


126.4 


127.3 


55.0 


71.4 





(1) 



Includes Federal, State, public utility districts, and cooperatives 



Sources: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States 
(90th Edition), Tables 759 and 760, pp. 514-515. 

U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States 
(83rd Edition), Tables 717 and 718, pp. 531-532. 



176- 



0. 141 



COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC SALES IN MARYLAND: 
1965-1969, 1960 



YEAR 



TOTAL COMMERCIAL 
AND INDUSTRIAL 
SALES (MILLION KWHR) 



COMMERCIAL SALES 
(MILLION KWHR) 



INDUSTRIAL SALES 
(MILLION KWHR) 



1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 



13,061 

11,856 

10,824 

9,852 

8,724 



5,107 
4,629 
4,122 
3,714 
3,291 



7,954 

7,227 
6,702 
6,138 
5,433 



1960 



5,631 



1,517 



4,114 



er Cent Change 
1968/1969 
1960/1969 



10.2 
131.9 



10.3 
236.5 



10.1 
93.3 



ource: Edison Electric Institute, 



-177- 



CO 


i — \ 






o 


N) 




h 


c 


v — < 






* 


I— 1 


> 


*-> n 


o 


KD 


'J) 


3 


n> 


On 


w 


CL Cn 


• • 


ON 


o 


CD 






o 


^ T3 




> 


H- 


CD 


O T) 


< 


05 


3 H 


4 


CD 


rt 


Cl CD 


fin O 


-i 


CD 


CD M 


3 


pa 


Cl 


3 CD 


T3 


<W 




rt ►tf 


C 


CD 


O 


3* 


H 3 




O 


o o 


CD T3 


2 


3 


O 3 


i- C 


O 


>B 


3 CD 


cd cr 


3 


8 


•s 


*d •— 


rt 


05 /— \ 


3 d H- 


3 d 


H- 


3 00 


o w 


t— • 


CD 


H- CD 


3 Sf 


*< 


</> 


CD t— ' 


CD CD 






t/1 t— ' 


CL 


Cl 


(/) 




n 


05 


CD 


W CO 


O Cl 


r+ 


H 


CD ^< 


3 P 


05 


< 


4 (/) 


T3 r+ 




CD 


< rt 


pj JU 


05 


Cl 


CD CD 


3 


4 




Cl 3 


*< </> 


CD 


n> 


^-^ 


C 




«■ 


NJ 


o *o 


05 


(—■ 


- < 


H^ 


t/> 


w 


.0* H- 


h-' 




o 


N) 4 


2 H- 


o 




O rt 


05 CD 


Mi 


2 


C 


H P- 




05 


2 05 


X 


O 


4 


03 1— ' 


»-• o* 


o 


X 


4 •- 


pa *< 


rt 


t— ' 


H *•< 


3 


O 


03 


i—" 


Cl r+ 


cr 


3 


p (/) 


• 3 d 


CD 


Cl 


3 CD 


CD 


i-S 




CL l-j 






o 


< 


T3 


M 


C 


O CD 


c 


• 


</) 


C (/> 


cr 




rt 


(/) 


h- ' 




O 


rt- rt 


H« 


I—" 


3 


O 3 d 


O 


«3 


CD 


3 CD 




On 


4 


CD 


72 


00 


W 


4 CD 


CD 






(/> 3 


h- ■ 


> 


H- 


rt 


P 


< 


3 


H . h- 


rt 


CD 




3 4 


H- 


4 


i— 1 


CD 


o 


05 


<o 


h- ' 


3 


era 


ON 


<£> C/J 


(/) 


CD 


ON 


On rt 
ON 05 


O 


2 


05 


rt 


CD 


O 


3 


05 CD 


►d 


3 


p. 


3 


05 


rt 




Cl O 


4 


3 d 


K5 


t-b 


rt 


h- ■ 


«* 


ro 


3 


X 


K> 


- 2 


CD 




H-» 


ON JD 


3 


cl 


00 


•— 4 


r+ 


05 




K5^ 


* 


rt 


2 


I— 1 




pa 


05 


2 pa 






H 


pa 3 




05 


-< 


4 Cl 




4 


i— ■ 


"< • 




CD 


05 


•— i 






3 


pa 




pa 


P. 


3 m 




en 




Cl X 






O 


O 




O 


c 


O CD 




Ml 


C/5 


C ^3 






rt 


</> rt 




O 


O 


rt H- 




CD 


3 


O O 




O 


CD 


3 3 




CD 


i-i 


CD W 




3 


</5 


Hj .. 




cr 




</1 




CD 


H- 






4 


3 


3 




w 


i— ■ 






(— > 


ID 


i— 1 




• 


ON 


*£5 






00 


ON 






• 


00 



ID 


<x> 


ON 


ON 


ON 


00 



en 



oo 



00 









00 









o 


t— ■ 


H 






h- » 


i— 1 


O 






ON 

Is 




> 






-£> 


00 


t- 






hO 


-t^ 








Ln 


*» 










1— I 


O 


73 






u 


m 


m 




KD 


o 


z 


co 




INJ 


K) 


H 


1— 1 




«3 


--J 


i— i 
> 


1 




VO 


K) 


r^ 






-fc. 


h— ' 








•^ 


un 






2 

O 


00 


VO 


C/N 






ON 


N5 


1— 1 




o 


« 


>• 


2 




T) 


Xi 


ON 


m 






00 


N5 


CO 




> 


1— 1 


^O 


en 




n 
n 

o 






H 


H 


c 


I— 1 


K5 


tn 


O 


z 


t* 


la 


r~ 


H 


H 


00 


t— ' 


m 


^ 


CO 


00 


On 


13 




ON 


W 


o 






K) 


<£> 


z 






o 


^1 


m 






o 


00 


m 

T3 






t— I 


t— 1 


r- 






la 


-Pa. 


o 






£» 


I—" 


m 






i— i 


00 


m 






»— i 


w 


co 








■&<^ 


i — \ 
>— • 


-o 
> 




O 


00 


o 
o 
o 

o 
o 

o 


O 
t- 1 

r 1 





T3 
CO 



*! > 



n 

m 



o z 

M O 

> • 

o 
•n 



-178- 



MOTOR VEHICLES 

Motor vehicles play a major role in the Maryland economy. In addition 
to the traffic volume and highway utilization rates, the manufacture, distri- 
bution, maintenance, and commercial use of motor vehicles in the State repre- 
sent a major economic force. 

It is estimated by the Automobile Manufacturers Association that the 
automotive businesses in the State represented, in 1967, 11.6 per cent of all 
businesses and 7.9 per cent of all employees in Maryland. Further, the total 
payrolls were 8.2 per cent of all payrolls in the State. These figures, im- 
pressive as they are, do not consider even allied or related businesses, e.g., 
construction, petroleum products. 

There were nearly 1,808,000 motor vehicles registered in our State [ 

during the registration year April 1, 1968 to April 30, 1969. An estimated 
2,017,000 persons held licenses to operate these vehicles during this period. 

There are 24,764 miles of highway in the State, nearly half of which 
are in the metropolitan Baltimore and the metropolitan Washington areas. 
Interstate highways comprise somewhat more than 305 miles of these totals. 
Traffic recorders located at 38 points in the State show substantial increases 
over prior periods of record, both one year and ten year comparisons. Save 
for the Susquehanna River Bridge, the five toll facilities have shown marked 
growth. Of course, the reduction in the Susquehanna Bridge's traffic came 
about as the result of the opening of the John F. Kennedy Highway, a road 
which roughly parallels U. S. Route 40. 

Motor vehicle user taxes, licenses, fines, and costs amounted to nearly 
$173,188,000 in fiscal 1968, up $11,637,000 from the fiscal 1967 figure. The 
1968 amount represents 16.3 per cent of the total State revenue for the fiscal 
year. 



179- 






NO. 143 



AUTOMOTIVE BUSINESSES IN MARYLAND: 1967 







TOTAL 




TOTAL 




REPORTING 


NUMBER OF 


PAYROLLS 


TYPE OF BUSINESS 


UNITS 


EMPLOYEES 


($1,000) 



Total Automotive Businesses 

Manufacturing 

Wholesale Trade 

Retail Trade 

Services 

Highway Transportation 



(1) 



All Businesses in Maryland 



(2) 



Automotive Businesses as 
per cent of all Businesses 
in Maryland 

Automotive Related Businesses 
(not above included) 



(3) 



6,098 


71,461 


$ 


390,756 


29 


9,567 




74,020 


345 


5,309 




34,552 


3,170 


27,493 




131,616 


941 


6,132 




27,272 


1,613 


22,960 




123,296 


2,714 


902,002 


$4 


,784,224 



11.6 
389 



7.9 
7,992 



8.2 
$ 49,496 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 



Self-employed persons are not included now as persons employed in automotive 
departments of establishments whose principal business is in non- automotive 
products. 

Does not include agriculture, government, railroads, persons in domestic service 
or self-employed persons. 

Petroleum extraction, refining, and wholesale distribution, highway and street 
construction, trailer parks. 



Source: Automobile Manufacturers Association, "Motor Vehicles in Maryland," p. 5. 



-180- 






NO. 144 MOTOR VEHICLES ASSEMBLED OR PRODUCED IN MARYLAND: 1966-1968 



CLASSIFICATION 



NUMBER PRODUCED 



PER CENT OF TOTAL 
U. S. PRODUCTION 



Passenger Cars (Model Year) 

1968 
1967 
1966 

Motor Trucks (Calendar Year) 

1967 
1966 



201,985 
196,415 
197,056 



47,932 
74,126 



2.4 
2.6 
2.3 



3.0 
4.2 



Source: Automobile Manufacturers Association, "Motor Vehicles in Maryland," 
p. 3. 



NO. 145 



NEW MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION AND NUMBER OF LICENSED 
DRIVERS IN MARYLAND: 1967 AND 1966 



TYPE 



1967 



1966 



Passeng 


sr Cars 




183 


,401 








185, 


106 


Motor Trucks 




21 


,641 








22, 


050 


Total 






205 


,042 








207, 


156 


Numb er 


d£ Licensed 


Drivers 


1,867 


,273 












Drivers 


per Private 


Motor Vehicle 


; 


L.17 












Source: 


Automobile 
p. 4. 


Manufacturers 


Association, 


"Motor 


Vehic 


les 


in 


Maryland 


M 



-181- 



NO. 146 



MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION IN MARYLAND, BY TYPE AND POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1968 AND 1965 





POLITICAL 




1968 ( ' 1 - ) 






1965 (2) 




SUBDIVISION 


TOTAL 


PLEASURE 


COMMERCIAL 


TOTAL 


PLEASURE 


COMMERCIAL 



Maryland 


1,807,820 


1,511,211 


Allegany 


42,279 


33,844 


Anne Arundel 


138,879 


116,555 


Baltimore City 


312,202 


259,506 


Baltimore 


309,186 


272,793 


Calvert 


8,923 


6,600 


Caroline 


13,666 


8,485 


Carroll 


37,721 


28,049 


Cecil 


24,839 


18,475 


Charles 


20,983 


15,816 


Dorchester 


16,666 


11,455 


Frederick 


44,888 


34,314 


Garrett 


10,444 


7,067 


Harford 


54,151 


43,748 


Howard 


32,184 


23,687 


Kent 


10,203 


7,285 


Montgomery 


270,292 


244,762 


Prince George's 


307,333 


267,522 


Queen Anne's 


10,331 


6,975 


St. Mary's 


17,902 


13,610 


Somerset 


8,881 


6,300 


Talbot 


14,337 


10,159 


Washington 


54,342 


42,750 


Wicomico 


32,536 


21,840 


Worcester 


14,652 


9,674 



96,549 


1,540,669 


1,297,147 


8,435 


39,156 


32,028 


22,324 


110,734 


93,583 


52,696 


298,031 


249,544 


36,393 


264,318 


234,641 


2,323 


8,032 


6,110 


5,181 


12,753 


7,928 


9,672 


32,607 


24,772 


6,364 


22,244 


16,972 


5,167 


16,793 


12,868 


5,211 


15,473 


11,055 


10,574 


38,697 


30,212 


3,377 


9,634 


6,714 


10,403 


41,869 


33,899 


8,497 


26,214 


19,598 


2,918 


8,813 


6,357 


25,530 


223,148 


202,123 


39,811 


238,298 


208,897 


3,356 


9,127 


6,377 


4,292 


14,207 


10,926 


2,581 


7,909 


5,684 


4,178 


12,855 


9,437 


11,592 


47,704 


37,744 


10,696 


28,798 


20,662 


4,978 


13,255 


9,016 



243,522 

7,128 
17,151 
48,487 
29,677 

1,922 

4,825 
7,835 
5,272 
3,925 
4,418 

8,485 
2,920 
7,970 
6,616 
2,456 

21,025 

29,401 

2,750 

3,281 

2,225 

3,418 
9,960 
8,136 
4,239 



(1) 



(2) 



Registration Year is April 1, 1968 to April 30, 1969, 



Registration Year is April 1, 1965 to April 30, 1966, 



Source: State of Maryland, Department of Motor Vehicles, "Segregation of Classifica- 
tions by Political Subdivision," for years stated. 



182- 



co 


, v 




o 


nj 


h 


c 


*. ^ 


s- 


4 


03 


TJ 


o 


P 


H- 


CD 


t— ' 


OP 




rt 


C 




H- 


4 




3 


CD 


03 2 


o 


in 


p p 


4 




I- 1 4 


cd 


4 


rt X 




O 


H- t— > 


n 


c 


3 P 


H- 


3 


O 3 


rt 


Cu 


e} cu 


v; 


CD 


ft) 




Ca- 


co 


o- 




n rt 


p 


rt 


H- P 


r+ 


O 


rt- rt 


P 




v; o> 




3 




P 


CD 


Cu 30 


4 


P 


p o 


CD 


4 


r+ p 




CD 


P P- 


P 


(/l 


CO 


in 


rt 


P 






4 n 


O 


3 


CD O 


i-h 


H" 


3 




t— ' 


►+> 3 


C_, 


CD 


>-S H- 


C 


• 


o w 


3 




3 co 


0) 




H- 


>* 


H 


r o 




O 


> 3 


►—• 


rt 


3 - 


CO 


P 


3 


On 


i— 1 


C z 


si 


co 


P 2 






h- ■ H- 


s: 


3 


I— 1 


=r 


P 


JO CD 


H- 


*■< 


0) P 


►— | 




*CS C/q 


CD 


3 


O CD 




O 


4 


P 


rt 


rt pO 


i — i 




ft) 


I— ■ 


P 


O "T3 




a. 


t+> O 


O 


a 


4 


rt 




a rt 


ST 


o- 


a> - 


CD 


c 


T3 r 


4 


CD 


P 






Hj P 


<_i. 


rt 


r+ in 


c 


O 


3 


4 




CD O 


H- 


4 


3 t+> 


V) 


O 


r+ 


CL 


c 


t-4 


M- 


3 


O P 


O 


D- 


i-h 3 


rt 


H- 


C 


H> 


3 


-a p 


O 


CK) 


C 4 


3 




cr x 


co 




i— 1 






H- 1— ■ 


P 




o - 


4 

to 




=S H- 






O CO 


P 




(-J o\ 


in 




?r co 






cn - 


o 




** 


l-h 




- P 






3 


a 




^ Cl 


CD 




'X! 


n 




ON p 


CD 




si in 


3 
cr 




P O 


CD 




3 t-h 


4 




Cc 






C_i 


CM 




►— • p 


i— 1 




CO 3 


<• 




Q\ c 






O P 


i—- 




• 4 


io 




X 


ON 
00 





CO 

ON 



s 


«i 


s: 


H 


CO 


££ 


*T3 


2 


?*: 


X 


re 


n 


-a 


o 


n 


n 


n 


n 


n 


OS 


co 


> > 


2 


o 


H- 


p 


P 


o 


4 


o 


CD 


O 


p 


p 


4 


o 


p- 


CD 


p 


p 


p 


P 


P 


3 i— 


P 


4 


o 


CO 


i — i 


3 


• CD 


H 1 


3 


3 


s; 


4 


^ 


CD 


^ 


p 


n 


^ 


4 


H- 1 


i — i 


►— ■ 


3 t- 1 


4 


o 


o 


3* 


cr 


CD 


CD 


3 


rt 


rt 


p 


t+i 


4 


D- 


o 


4 


H- 


^ 


o 


< 


ct 


rt 


CD CD 


X 


CD 


3 


H- 


o 


4 


S 3 


o 


era 




4 


O 


0) 


CD 


s 4 


h^ 


1 — ' 


o 


i — > 


CD 


1-^- 


h^- 


era 


t— ' 


W 


H- 


3 


rt 


cn 


P 


CD 


o 




PL 


4 


rt 


4 


CD 


CD 




1— ' 


H- 


4 


3 


3 


> P 


P 


rt 


O 


era 




CD 


4 > 




3 






a. 


rt 


h" 


V) 


tyi 




t— ■ 


3 


rt 


O 


o 


4 3 


3 


c 


G 


r+ 




rt 


x: 3 


O 


CD 










O 


rt 








CD 




4 


4 


C X 


a. 


4 




O 

3 






- 3 
Cn CD 

cn 


CD 

O 

4 

O'C 
CD 


4 










?r 


CD 

4 












CD 


o 
n 

rt 


3 

CD 
i— 1 





Nl 00 H J^ 

M -si tn t£) 
W 00 O CD 



*> Ul O OO CO 

-t^ oo w cn o 

W n! WO «3 



W 



Ln O CO -(^ 
00 cn O oo 

nI CO (O^l 



o> 00 O 4*. 
00 4^ ON ^J 
CD l— 1 CD ^1 



*. cn Q\ 4^ 
W Cn N) O 
tsj K> 4^ O 



O 



-t^ Cn CD 00 4^ 

t— ' i— 1 Cm CO t— ' 
O hO CD 00 CO 



--J O -J O CA 

W O -^ CO Cn 
^J OJ O t— ' o 



\1 cn CT\ O O 
K) 0> CO KJ -t^ 

ID (C si O W 



X 



K) 

K) K) l— 1 -C* 

CM 4^ CA -t' 00 \1 

in ai O n! Co o> 
CM I— • 4^ h- ' 00 4^. 



K) K) I— ' to 

CM I— • 4^ K) 00 CA 

4^ CO Cn 00 CM CD 

i— ' \i ON O 4^- i— 1 



>—• I — ' K) t— • 
00 Cn CO CM 
Cn W si K) 



I— ' I— ' NJ CM CM 
O CO O 4i> --J 
W Nl K) Nl w 



t— ' I— ' NJ H-" CM 
^J Cn <J\ ON ON 

4>. q\ ON 4^ t— • 



H K) M K) H 
4^ CM t— • CM Cn 
Cn cn O NJ On 



t— ' CM 
l— 1 ON 
CM \1 



CM t- 1 

00 NJ 



H- 1 t— ' 


NJ 


i — i 


^1 -C^ 


4- 


NJ 


4^ tsJ 


Cn 


CO 



NJ 

\) Cn on On 



CM 



H H H W U 

O lO CD O cn 

W D CO ID in ONNJCMCMCn >-^ 



4^>C>ONCM CMCM4^.O0 
OnOOnO OCni— 'On 
001— 'On^J COOCni— ' 



NJ CM ON ON CO 

NJ CT* O 00 CD 
O O CM ^J NJ 



ON O On 4^ 

n1 cn 00 Ji 



NJ 

O 4^ 



ON 



CO 4^ CM 

HIDO 



Cn 

Cn »— ■ 4^- Cn CM 

4^ NJ i— ■ \1 cn 



O 

o> 

CO 



NJ 


to 


to 


I—" 


I— 1 


CM 


CM 


I — ' 


--J 


CM 


o 


o 


cn 


1 — 1 


CM 


t— ' 


Cn 


~-J 


t J 


I—" 


00 


NJ 


O 


CO 


Cn 


NJ 


-P* 



4- 


ON ON 


CM 


CM 


w 


4- 


O 4^ 


NJ 


4- 


ON ON 


CO 


Cn 


CM 4^ \1 


-Pa. 


NJ O 


O cn 


NJ 


-J 


NJ CD 


NJ 


NJ 


co 


i — i 


CD I— 1 


NJ 


CM 


oo oo 


CO 


CM 


Cn \1 CO 


cn 


NJ --J 


On CM 


--J 


o 


O I-* 


NJ 


Y— ' 


ON 


co 


4*. Cn 


CM 


1 — l 


CM CD 


-J 


00 


4^ O NJ 


CD 


\! CM 


00 CM 


4^ 



Cn CfJ -ti si 4i to Co CO cn CO 

CMNJONCncn i— ' cn O t-> CO 

Cn CO cn CO CO CD--0 4^0N O 



NJ -ti 

ON K^ 00 

O ON 00 On 

4^ 00 CM CM 



1— ' 


NJ >— ' 




i— 1 






4^ i— 


CO 


CD Cn 4^ 


NJ H ID *• 


1 — ' 


s] *k H 


Cn cm Cn CM 


I — i 


Cn On On 


NJ 


00 Nl O 


O CM *-> O 1— • 


-P» 


N) si W 


CM 00 t— • 4^ 4^ 


NJ 


On i— ' si 


s] 



C 
73 



CO 

o 



n 



O 



CO 

ON 

oo 



H 
O 
H 
> 
r -1 



CD 
ON 
O 



CO 
ON 

oo 



CO 

> 
H 

m 



CO 
ON 

o 



CO 

ON 

oo 



n 

o 






CO 

ON 

o 



CO 

ON 

oo 



n 



> 



CD 
ON 

O 



4^ 
si 



H 
O 
H 
> 
r 1 



■x. 
> 



m 
> 

CD 

m 

03 
>< 

H 
-< 
-O 

m 

o 
■n 

co 

►< 

CO 

H 
tn 



5? 

JO 



a 



co 

ON 
00 



CD 

ON 

o 



183- 



NO. 148 AVERAGE DAILY VEHICLE MILES, STATE MAINTAINED ROADS: 1968 AND 1959 



COUNTY 



1968 ADVM 



1959 ADVM 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1959/1968 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne 1 s 
Somerset 
St. Mary's 
Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



29,803,317 

703,003 

3,431,359 

5,311,901 

226,973 

265,615 

624,740 
686,965 
611,942 
300,606 
1,321,856 

302,501 

1,120,714 

946,225 

218,691 

4,485,017 

5,244,319 
487,492 
285,746 
449,151 
452,025 

1,272,497 
559,124 
494,855 



17,101,300 

469,176 

1,949,033 

2,750,101 

121,620 

215,873 

449,604 
674,050 
482,169 
215,738 
906,510 

205,721 

1,035,556 

598,089 

180,860 

2,071,669 

2,066,216 
337,907 
209,926 
352,575 
317,458 

662,173 
448,887 
380,389 



74.3 

49.8 
76.1 
93.2 
86.6 
23.0 

39.0 
1.9 

26.9 
39.3 
45.8 

47.0 

8.2 

58.2 

20.9 

116.5 

153.8 



44 
36 
27 
42, 



92.2 

24.6 
30.1 



Source: State Roads Commission of Maryland, Bureau of Highway Statistics, 
"Allocation of Maintenance Funds Report," for years 1968 and 1959. 



184- 





cn 


, — , 






o 


NJ 


V 




c 


N — 1 






4 


O 


O 




o 


t3 


nd 




CD 


CD 


CD 






3 


3 






CD 


CD 






CL 


ex 


4 -< 


:<: 






cd (D 


p 


D 


2 


^3 p 


4 


CD 


O 


O 4 


X 


O 


< 


4 <• 


i— ' 


CD 


CD 


r+ 


(U 


3 


3 


n> 2 


3 


cr 


cr 


CL O 


CL 


CD 


CD 


• 3 




4 


4 


r+ 


CO 


w 




3" 


r+ 




to 


* 


P 


i— > 


tD 




rt 


to 


<• 


P 


CD 


ON 




3 




CM 


I— i 


(X 


SO 




tO 




O 


fa 


On 


O 


P 


w 


-^1 


P 


CL 




• 


X 


t/i 


o 




P 


n 


4 




rt 


o 


rt 






3 


cr 




£ 


3 

H- 


CD 




H" 


in 


W 




4 


w 


r+ 




rt 


H- 


CD 




X 


o 


4 




1 


3 


3 




tn 


\# 






H- 




m 




(TO 


00 


X 




3' 


c 


►d 




r+ 


4 


4 






cd 


CD 




> 


fa 


(/) 




c 


C 


t/i 




r+ 




£ 




O 


o 


{0 




3 


t-h 


X 




P 




• 




rt 


H 






H- 


4 






O 


fa 






H 


Hh 






4 


H- 






to 


O 






i-h 


*. 






i-h 








H- 


X 






O 


n 
o 






5"3 


3 






0) 


t3 






o 


to 






o 


4 






i-5 


P 






PL 


rt 






CD 


H- 






4 


< 






w 


(D 

H 
4 






a. 


rtj 






-n 


i-h 






H- 


H- 






< 


O 






ro 


< 






H 


o 






o 


►— ' 






t— > 


c 






I— 1 


3 

CD 






T1 








SB 


e 






O 


3 






H- 


CL 






1— ' 








H- 


T3 






r+ 


n> 






H' 


4 






0) 








w 


n 






It 


CD 






- 


3 
rt 






Hi 








O 


n 






4 


3* 
pa 






X 


3 






cd 


OQ 






v> 


CD 






4 








w 


cr 







1— ■ 


t— ' 


r> 


n 


T3 
























IC 


U2 


3" 


cd 


CD 


to 


VD 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


cr 


UT 


w 


3 


4 


On 


Cn 


ON 


o 


ON 


ON 


ON 


ON 


C\ 


ON 


ON 


CX) 


00 


3 
CD 


rt 




00 


tO 


o 


I—" 


K) 


CM 


-pi 


Cn 


on 


--J 


00 












N> 


bJ 


NJ 


NJ 


CM 


CM 


cm 


CM 


CM 


^ 


-pi 












CM 


ON 


■-J 


to 


H 


NJ 


Cn 


^J 


00 


o 


1— ' 












NJ 


M 


00 


t— « 


NJ 


NJ 


-J 


i— ' 


00 


CM 


to 


oo 










t— ' 


00 


00 


o 


CM 


to 


CM 


O 


o 


>— ' 


to 


c 










ON 


to 


-pi 


o 


Cn 


Cn 


to 


00 


to 


KJ 


on 



to 



o 
o 



to 



Cn 

Cn 



i 

CM 
CM 



o 

cn 



CM 



O^ NJ 

00 On 
-J 00 



-pi 
•Pi 

cn 



00 



ON 

ON 

to 



to 

NJ 

■Pi 



ON 
N) 
ON 



CM 
NJ 



Cn 



ON 



o 

ON 



Cn 

to 



ON tSj 

^J Cn 



00 00 



-1^ 


I— 1 


NJ 


Cn 


t—' 


00 


1 — 1 


to 


--J 


CM 


On 


00 


CM 


ac 


•—• 


00 


ON 


to 


ro 


^J 


> 



K> Cn 
tO Cn 
^1 K) 



00 

ON 



00 
CM 






N) NJ CM CM CM 



CM 



-t^ 


-J 


O 


CM 


oo 


h-' 


OO 


O 


CM 


Cn 


to 


ON 


CM 


>— ■ 


-t^ 


CM 


On 


Cn 


ON 


CM 


■P* 


-t^ 


K> 


to 


Cn 


t— • 


KJ 


-f^ 


Cn 


K) 


Cn 


O 


ON 



NJ 


CM 


to 


-J 


--4 


oo 


J^ 


NJ 


ON 


^J 


NJ 


ON 


oo 


-t^ 


oo 


-p^ 


^J 


to 



NJ 



to 

Cn 

Cn 



-P*. to CM 

ON CM ON 

Cn oo -vl 



N)N>NJN)CMCMCMN) 

























Xi 


i-i o 


o 


N) 


ja. 


-vl 


o 


NJ 


>— ' 


o 


to 


oo 


00 


1 — 1 


< H 


o 


h— > 


*». 


^J 


to 


CM 


ON 


00 


-p^ 


to 


to 


o 


m o 


vj 


^J 


^J 


I— 1 


-p* 


00 


to 


o 


NJ 


CM 


--J 


o 
tn 


> 


00 


^J 


Cn 


ON 


I— 1 


ON 


cn 


CM 


CM 


NJ 


>— ' 




n 


o 


o 


00 


ON 


Cn 


cn 


ON 


00 


00 


•fc> 


►— ' 






to 


►— ' 


to 


oo 


t— ' 


N> 


00 


1— ■ 


oo 


00 


o 







tototototocncncncn 



-J 


CM 


4^ 


Cn 


oo 


Cn 


00 


^j 


to 


to 


00 


^J 


o 


NJ 


-Pi 


to 


00 


to 


m 


CM 


N) 


Cn 


to 


-pi 


^J 


NJ 


to 


CM 


oo 


to 


•^J 


to 


o 



00 
Cn 



00 
O 

ON 



-Pi 

00 

-Pi 



ON 

•Pi 



to 

ON 

•Pi 



oo 
to 

Cn 



-Pi -Pi 
ON tO 
CM OO 



oo 
oo 



i — ■ i — » i — > i — ' i — ■ i — > » — > i — • i — > t-j 

tONJN)CM-Pi-PiCN-~JOtO>0 

<OOtO-pi.piOOONtOO--4-Pi 
CNNJtO-piO^CM-pihJONCN 
-~j--JCM.pitOON-J00CMCn.Pi 

I— '--JN)CNNJ-Pit— ' M 00 ^J t> 
OoCNCJN--]CN-pil— 'tOONONtO 
Cni— 't— 'ON-PiOOl— 'CM^JL-'OO 



I 

to 
cn 



w co n 
xi > "X 
m -< m 



03 ?D TD 



70 cn 

M C 

< CO 

m o 

•po c 

m 



h rn 


CO 


c: > 


> 


2 ?o 


C -1 


•z. CO 


H 


m o 


i— i 


tr to 


■^ 


, — ^ 


O 


i— 1 


70 




m 



185- 



THE PORT OF BALTIMORE 

The Port of Baltimore ranks as the fourth largest foreign trade port 
in the United States. In 1968, 22,492,949 long tons of cargo were handled, 
an increase of more than 10 per cent over the corresponding figure for 1967. 
Approximately 79 per cent of this tonnage was in import commerce. 

Although the export tonnage represents only 21 per cent of the total 
tonnage, its value is nearly 39 per cent of the total value. This fact is 
due to the more sophisticated nature of the manufactured devices primarily 
in export as opposed to the bulk commodities and raw materials being imported. 

In terms of tonnage the principal countries of lading on foreign 
commerce are Canada, Venezuela, Liberia, and the Netherlands Antilles, but, 
in value West Germany, the United Kingdon, Japan, and Canada lead, in that 
order. Broken into trade areas, Europe has a clear lead in value while in 
tonnage the North American countries are our principal traders. 

The use of containerization is growing markedly, and the Port is being 
used more with facilities built for this purpose. The Maryland Port Authority 
is presently constructing public container facilities at Locust Point to 
supplement existing container facilities at the newly expanded Dundalk Marine 
Terminal and the Canton facility. In addition, private enterprise has already 
dedicated a major container facility in the Baltimore Port. Gantry and giant 
bridge cranes serve these facilities. The response of shippers to the Port's 
containerization programs has been quite impressive and a tribute to the 
facilities. 

As more general cargo is handled, and technological advances continue, 
the value of goods continues to increase, and the vitality of the Port to the 
economy of the State becomes even more important. 



186- 



CO 

O 

c 
>-J 
o 



T3 2 
O f" 

v. fD 



to 

ON 

00 



TJ 



& 

rt 

on rr 

• o 



X 



T1 

o 



3 



n 
o 



i-j 
o 

CD 

CO 
r+ 
05 
r+ 
H- 
(/) 
r+ 
H- 
O 
05 



SO 
fD 

O 

rt 



"O 

o 



o 

l-t) 



05 



3 
O 
H 
CD 

05 
3 
Cl 

O 
r+ 

sr 

CD 
i-i 



05 

(— • 
3 

O- 



VO 


to 


to 


<o 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


cn 


cn 


Cn 


cn 


Cn 


O 


ON 


ON 


ON 


ON 


ON 


ON 


On 


ON 


Cn 


ON 


-J 


00 


to 


o 


1—" 


IS) 


CM 


4*. 


cn 


ON 


sl 


oo 



Is) 
N5 



cn 

ON 
IS) 



to 

Sl 

to 



ts) 

On 



00 



to >—• 

On O 

4^ -J 



ts) 
00 



ts) 
ts) 



IS) 
O 



ts) 
ts) 



Is) 

O 



Is) 
ts) 



ts) 

IS) 



ts) 

CM 



si H M si 

ON ON CM ON 

00 I— • NJ to 



CM 

to 
to 



to 

Is) 



o 

Is) 

ON 



ON ON 

i— ' cn 
4^. ts) 



CM 
4^ 

o 



o 
4^ 

00 



o 

Cn 
O 



to 

ON 



00 CM O CM -C». o 
sl O O O On -P» 

i— ' cn t— ■ ON -£> ts) 



Is) 
sl 

Is) 

O 
CM 



si 

Cn 

CM 



CM 

to 



o 

ON 
CM 



-p> 

ts> 

to 

00 
Is) 
00 



si O 

O ON 

4*. o 



-P* cn 
CM 4^. 

ON 4^ 



00 
cn 
CM 



to 

00 

to 



cn 


ON 


I— 1 


ON 


to 


IS) 


to 


ON 


cn 


Si 


O 


1— 1 


00 


I— 1 


Is) 


O 


CM 


h-' 



ON 



00 

o 



CM 

ts) 

CM 



Is) 

o 

CM 



si O 

oo cn 

O 00 



-P^CnONCnONONCnON 
OCMt-'4^IS)ts)4i.4i. 

4^0slCM4^000 



CM 4*. 4^ 
O ON ON 

ON O ON 



CM to 
O tsj 

ON CM 



s] O 

CM s] 
Cn CM 



00 00 cn 



CM 



On On cn cn 



O 
O 

to 



cn 

ON 
IS) 



oo 

ON 
ON 



00 
00 



cn oo 
00 -p* 

IS) ON 



Is) 

to 



•p* 
-p* 

to 



IS) 

o 



to 


00 


ON 


CM 


si 


CM 


ON 


to 


ON 


cn 


00 


CM 


-P> 4 


s] 


H* 


I— 1 


00 


CM 


to 


ts) 


Cn 


sl 


ts) 


00 


CM 


Is) tl 


ON 


ts) 


t— ' 


ts) 


Is) 


00 


-p> 


Cn 


O 


si 


-P* 


CM 


to t- 



o 

sl 
ts) 



o 

sl 

to 



to o o 

ts) O cn 
4^ ts) CM 



ts) 
ts) 



to 

4^ 

to 



4=> sl 

ON ON 

00 4*. 



sl 

CM 

ON 



1—" 


t— ' 


ts) 


I— 1 


h- ' 


I—" 


1— ' 


I— 1 


t— ' 


>— i 


1— ' 


i— ' 


(— ' h 


cn 


00 


O 


On 


ON 


00 


CM 


ON 


Cn 


ON 


sl 


sl 


ON - 


cn 


1—" 


I— ' 


On 


to 


o 


cn 


CM 


Cn 


I—" 


ON 


to 


CM 


4*. 


00 


£* 


sl 


to 


o 


sl 


CM 


00 


IS) 


CM 


Cn 


sl C 


to 


CM 


to 


Cn 


ts) 


I—" 


ON 


4^ 


-P> 


00 


Cn 


00 


CM C 



O CM 

>— o 

to i— ' 



ON 


s] 


sl 


00 


00 


O 


to 


ts) 


Cn 


00 


ON 


00 


cn 


Is) 


00 


to 


ON 


4^ 


O 


t— ' 


sl 


cn 


ON 


O 


4^ 


45> 


ON 


to 


CM 


CM 


ON 


cn 


On 


Cn 


On 


00 



4* 


ON 


-P> 


sl 


sl 


CM 


o 


ON 


o 


CM 


IS) 


CM 


O - 


ts) 


ts) 


ON 


o 


CM 


to 


4^ 


ts) 


00 


to 


4* 


sl 


cn t- 


ON 


to 


ts) 


ON 


to 


sl 


si 


O 


ON 


to 


00 


Cn 


ON C 



s] 

ro 

ON 
ON 

4*. 

0O 





























■SO- 


Cn 


cn 


sl 


cn 


4^ 


Cn 


Cn 


cn 


ON 


sl 


ON 


ON 


ON 


ON 


si 


to 


ts) 


O 


ts) 


sl 


00 


sl 


to 


O 


Sl 


cn 


O 


00 


cn 


sl 


ts) 


Cn 


Cn 


Cn 


sl 


4^ 


ON 


sl 


oo 


Cn 


I— 1 


o 


cn 


00 


cn 


O 


Cn 


CM 


i— ■ 


O 


o 


ON 


O 


CM 


4S> 


ON 


On 


4^ 


CM 


o 


4^ 


o 


CM 


CM 


I— 1 


00 


00 


to 


-P» 


to 


Cn 


cn 


Cn 


o 


I— ' 


sl 


o 


ON 


si 


CM 


sl 


4^ 


CM 


00 



m 
> 
so 



> 
o" m 



-&* < 

h- > 

«• t- 1 

o c 

o m 
o 



> 

cr m 



-so < 

»- > 
v. r" 
o c 
o m 
o 



187- 



NO. 151 IMPORT TRADE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE ARRANGED BY PRINCIPAL 
COUNTRIES IN ORDER OF TONNAGE AND BY TRADE AREAS: 1968 











RANK BY 




COUNTRY OF LADING 


LONG TONS 


VALUE 


TONNAGE 


VALUE 


Canada 


4,667,305 


$ 65,384,976 


4 




Venezuela 


4,401,325 


44,385,879 


5 




Liberia 


1,422,489 


23,854,266 


12 




Netherlands Antilles 


1,417,628 


17,916,437 


14 




Chile 


977,454 


14,308,017 


16 




Brazil 


638,204 


36,142,880 


8 




Mexico 


366,001 


13,533,060 


17 




West Germany 


327,029 


287,388,624 


1 




Trinidad and Tobago 


247,820 


3,882,811 


23 




Philippines 


238,384 


26,540,721 


11 




Peru 


237,413 


39,542,140 


6 




Iran 


210,785 


3,376,495 


25 




Japan 


198,233 


73,615,577 


3 




United Kingdom 


192,421 


108,852,100 


2 




Dominican Republic 


168,041 


21,918,222 


13 




Colombia 


164,929 


7,311,583 


19 




Republic of South Africa 


162,801 


16,787,361 


15 




Bahamas 


127,804 


556,796 


30 




Belgium 


123,845 


27,877,508 


10 




France 


123,378 


30,583,474 


9 




Argentina 


98,835 


7,247,147 


20 




Panama 


98,592 


9,628,361 


18 




British Guiana 


92,381 


2,773,273 


26 




Italy 


82,820 


36,572,641 


7 




Tunisia 


80,789 


831,865 


29 




Turkey 


60,915 


1,848,877 


27 




Australia 


58,212 


5,486,728 


22 




Congo 


58,160 


1,307,865 


28 




India 


56,078 


3,612,093 


24 




Greece 


55,528 


6,513,146 


21 






IMPORTS BY TRADE 


AREA 






North America 


7,230,449 


144,989,361 


3 




South America 


6,669,053 


156,543,683 


2 




Africa 


1,810,274 


58,578,028 


5 




Europe 


1,178,296 


572,938,137 


1 




Asia 


812,235 


141,489,837 


4 




Australia and Oceana 


65,994 


9,498,622 


6 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, "Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, Port of 
Baltimore: 1968," p. 51. 



188- 



NO. 152 



EXPORT TRADE OF THE PORT OF BALTIMORE ARRANGED BY 
PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES IN ORDER OF TONNAGE AND BY 
TRADE AREAS: 1968 



COUNTRY OF UNLADING 



LONG TONS 



VALUE 



RANK BY VALUE 



Japan 

France 

West Germany 

Pakistan 

United Kingdom 

India 

Yugoslavia 

Brazil 

Italy 

Netherlands 

Argentina 

South Viet Nam 

Venezuela 

Belgium 

Spain 

Sweden 

Chile 

Norway 

Republic of South Africa 

Taiwan 

Morocco 

Hungary 

Philippines 

East Germany 

Tunisia 

Australia 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

Columbia 

Libya 



1,145 


558 


550 


609 


480 


,777 


403 


371 


295 


,409 


210 


739 


210 


,334 


157 


,955 


133 


,427 


119 


094 


117 


,046 


90 


926 


88 


,113 


74 


,522 


68 


,75 7 


57 


,636 


35 


,243 


29 


,555 


28 


,657 


25 


,052 


23 


,801 


23 


,201 


23 


,186 


22 


,107 


18 


,062 


17 


,544 


17 


,080 


14 


,965 


14 


,510 


12 


,711 



33 


360, 


35 


135, 


40 


316, 


57 


730, 


51 


034, 


21 


935, 


3 


090, 


19 


814, 


31 


320, 


28 


297, 


9 


918, 


20 


289, 


37 


437, 


17 


822, 


17 


884, 


16 


711, 


10 


357, 


4 


057, 


32 


,451, 


5 


,462, 


2 


,230, 


2 


,744, 


25 


495, 


1 


,303, 


1 


,509, 


22 


,587, 


14 


,295, 


6 


,564, 


11 


,008, 


4 


,049, 



154 


6 


309 


5 


757 


3 


957 


1 


741 


2 


728 


12 


541 


26 


299 


14 


040 


8 


435 


9 


593 


21 


100 


13 


062 


4 


850 


16 


218 


15 


347 


17 


074 


20 


934 


24 


228 


7 


335 


23 


986 


28 


108 


27 


087 


10 


875 


30 


971 


29 


407 


11 


600 


18 


543 


22 


221 


19 


428 


25 



EXPORTS BY TRADE AREA 



Europe 


2,134,051 


283,610,611 


1 


Asia 


1,945,979 


199,027,703 


2 


South America 


434,982 


100,860,048 


3 


Africa 


115,409 


63,799,601 


4 


North America 


35,070 


10,437,693 


6 


Australia and Oceania 


17,824 


22,961,980 


5 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, "Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, Port of 
Baltimore: 1968," p. 30. 



189- 



NO. 153 



RANKING OF PRINCIPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 
FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, IMPORTS: 1968 AND 1967 
(Quantities Shown in Tons of 2,240 Pounds) 



PORT 



1968 



1967 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1967/1968 



United States 

New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Portland, Me. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Paulsboro, N. J. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Boston, Mass. 
New Orleans , La. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Los Angeles, Calif, 
Houston, Tex. 
Long Beach, Calif. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Tampa, Fla. 



70,741,071 


243,104,018 


11.4 


49,802,679 


45,510,714 


9.4 


22,533,929 


23,930,803 


-5.8 


19,903,571 


16,505,357 


20.6 


17,766,301 


16,373,019 


8.5 


10,722,321 


6,810,714 


57.4 


7,948,661 


7,978,571 


-.4 


7,535,714 


6,896,875 


9.3 


5,819,196 


4,424,554 


31.5 


5,577,678 


5,904,018 


-5.5 


4,828,125 


5,024,553 


-3.9 


4,514,732 


3,237,054 


39.5 


3,476,786 


2,917,411 


19.2 


3,289,732 


3,287,946 


.1 


2,514,732 


1,988,393 


26.5 


2,043,750 


1,666,964 


22.6 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, "Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, Port 
of Baltimore: 1968," p. 12. 



190- 



NO. 154 



RANKING OF PRIM IPAL UNITED STATES SEAPORTS IN 
FOREIGN WATERBORNE TRADE, EXPORTS: 1968 AND 1967 
(Quantities Shown in Tons of 2,240 Pounds) 



PORT 



1968 



1967 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1967/1968 



United States 

Norfolk, Va. 
New Orleans, La. 
Houston, Tex. 
Tampa, Fla. 
Newport News, Va. 
New York, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Baton Rouge, La. 
Long Beach, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mobile, Ala. 
Boston, Mass. 
Paulsboro, N. J. 
Portland, Me. 



174,712,500 


168,785,268 


3.5 


24,700,446 


24,236,608 


1.9 


11,564,732 


11,047,321 


4.7 


10,274,554 


9,089,732 


13.0 


9,394,643 


7,951,339 


18.2 


7,053,125 


7,954,464 


-11.3 


6,223,214 


6,375,000 


- 2.4 


4,726,648 


4,056,053 


16.5 


4,480,357 


4,667,857 


- 4.0 


4,424,107 


4,317,857 


2.5 


4,247,322 


4,521,875 


- 6.1 


2,222,768 


2,214,285 


.4 


1,984,375 


1,676,786 


18.3 


656,697 


633,482 


3.7 


232,143 


288,393 


-19.5 


1,339 


61,607 


-97.8 



Source: Maryland Port Authority, "Foreign Commerce Statistical Report, Port 
of Baltimore: 1968," p. 11. 



191- 



00 
vO 

CT 



tu 
o 



E- 

< 

00 



E- 

o; 
o 
ex, 

LU 

•x. 

E- 

O 
E- 
2 



E- 

a: 
o 

a. 



CO 

2 

^ O 

E- E- 
i— i 
E- U 

< O 
3 -J 



LU 

< 
> 



E- 

a: 
o 

CL, 
X 
LU 



2 

>- O 

E- E- 
i — i 

H U 

2 2 
< O 

3 -J 



LU 



> 



E- 



E- U 



< 
E- 
O 
H 



3 



LU 

-J 
< 
> 



>H 
o 

LU 

E- 
< 



to 


to 


LO 


o 


CM 


r— 1 


tO 


i—l 


o 


»\ 


»* 


*« 


\C 


vO 


r~~ 


vO 


to 


to 


r^ 


o 





CO 


LO 


00 


vO 


LO 


LO 


vO 


CM 


OO 


•* 


»\ 


»\ 


r^ 


cm 


vO 


to 


cm 


ct 


o 


^o 


oo 


»v 


1 


*s 


^r 


vO 


vO 


oo 


LO 


eg 


o 


1 — 1 





** 


Tf 


LO 


i— i 


r- 


i — 1 


to 


r~- 


ct 


»* 


•4 


*\ 


to 


LO 


vO 


00 


LO 




vO 


CT 





\o 


vO 


to 


to 


rf 


LO 


vO 


to 


I— 1 


•V 


*v 


»« 


I~- 


CTi 


. 1 


CT 


to 


00 


vO 


l-H 


o 


*\ 


•s 


»- 


o 


vO 


o 


00 


r-« 


1— 1 


vO 






■&e- 







t^ 


r-» 


o 


1— 1 


CT 


to 


sO 


oo 


CT 


». 


* 


m, 


CTi 


l-H 


to 


■sf 


CT 


<tf 


"* 


CT 




»v 


•\ 




CM 


i-h 




cm 






-* 


i—i 


i—i 


o 


O 


■— i 


to 


vO 


O 


•V 


•\ 


»« 


LO 


i—l 


oo 


to 


vD 


r^ 


r- 


r-. 


CT 


•\ 


*v 


•\ 


>* 


cm 


vO 


vO 


to 


to 


r^ 


CM 





to 

00 
LO 

CM 
LO 
CM 



oo 

LO 

CT 

LO 



vO 
i— I 
CT 

LO 
O 

to 



LO 

to 
to 

r-« 

to 



LO 
LO 



CT 
CT 
■** 

00 
LO 
LO 



to 

CT 
CM 



CT 
CM 
(Nl 



LO 

00 

oo 



CT 
CT 

LO 
i—l 

LO 
LO 



to 

CT 
00 
CM 



o 

CT 
CM 



CT 

oo 

LO 

vO 



CM 

O 

o 

vo 
o 

LO 

oo 



oo 

CT 

LO 



00 

o 

00 



CM 00 

i-H tO 

L0 to 



CT 
vO 



O LO 00 

i-H to CTi 

l-H O 



oo 


LO 


h» 


\D 


LO 


LO 


00 


00 


00 


»» 


«\ 


■s 


^ 


vO 


hs 


00 


LO 


to 


CT 


LO 


i-H 


»\ 


»* 


* 


to 


to 


to 




CM 


to 



00 


c 


r-< 


to 


■«* 


CT 


CM 


CT 


00 


•» 


#\ 


■t 


to 


00 


CM 




\0 


r^ 




CM 


oo 



^r oo i-H 

i— i vO i — i 
CM CT "3- 



tO 
CT 



■— < LO 

r~- to 



vO 


oo 


vO 


to 


rj- 


sD 


00 


r-~ 


LO 


•\ 


•V 




to 


*tf 


i-H 


i-H 


o 


r-- 




■* 


CT 



CM 


to 


00 


00 


CM 


vO 


o 


00 


CM 


»\ 


#\ 


•i 


t~- 


LO 


l-H 


CTl 


CT 


to 


^r 


00 


00 


*v 


•s 


* 


^r 


>* 


oo 




CT 


o 



CT 
CT 
^1- 

00 
LO 
CM 



LO 

o 
o 

CT 
CM 



O 



o 
oo 



LO 


CM 


LO 


O 


CT 


CT 


** 


*» 


vO 


O 


r*«- 


\D 


CT 


i-H 


•v 


*s 


O 


CM 


CT 


*tf 


to 


CM 



CM 

CT 
00 

to 



r^ 


^r 


CO 


CM 


LO 


00 


*> 




r^ 


LO 


r~- 


i-H 


CM 


^T 


»* 


« 


to 


CM 


CM 


l-H 


CM 


CM 



^r 


CM 


o 


vO 


LO 


o 


^ 


•N 


r~- 


^1- 


oo 


00 


to 


LO 



CM 


\Q 


'* 


CM 


LO 


r> 


^ 


^ 


, ^- 


vO 


LO 


r- 


CM 


LO 


* 


•> 


^r 


■?t 


i — i 


LO 


^o 


-* 



CT 



vO 



CM 

O 

00 
00 
CT 



CT 



to 
to 



LO 



CM 
LO 



LO 



CT 
CT 
CT 







































13 
<D 








































L0 








L0 








?H 








i 
























-»-> 








l-H 








13 








3 






4-1 


•H 




1 


i 
















•i 


Dh 




*. 


-0 


cd 


i 






O 








•M 






o 


to 




G 


fH 
















LO 


0) 




L0 


c 


•H 


0) -o 






o 


T3 






CJ 




-3 


c 


L0 


M 


<C 


< 


bO 














l-H 


u 




i-H 


cd 


^ 


M C 






u 


C 






cd 




C 




cd 


C 






C 






<U 




13 




cd 


X 




<D 




a) 


cu cd 








cd 






<+H 




cd 


L0 


i — i 


■H 


•* 


13 


•H 






> 




C 




•H 


<D 




3 


•V 


4- 1 


> 






13 















c 


o 


T3 


U 


C 


+-> 






•H 




rt 




u 






u. 


to 


cd 


to 






a> 


X 


+j 


■I-) 


c 




L0 


o 




3 


cd 


cd 


X 






-J 








<D 


*. 






*J 


S 


T3 --H 






u 


~ 


h 


C 


cd 




CD 


• H 


Qi 


l-H 


S 




bO 










U1 




•M 







■t 


C 




C -H 




L0 


3 


0) 


O 


o 


S 




■H 


4-» 


u 


CJ 




C 


•H 


t/l 




T3 


W 


CD 


O 


cd 


i — ( 




tfl 


cd 


T3 


cd O 




i-H 


■M 


c 


Oh E 






+J 


CJ 


CD 


C 


L|H 


o 


PL, 


OJ 




p 


i — 1 


bO 


O 


S 


X) 




i-H 


o 


Oi 






cd 


CJ 


■ H 


L0 


^ 


fH 


L0 


•H 


cd 


s: 


•H 


o 


•H 




i — i 




03 


nl 


cd 


o 




•H 


10 


cd 


■H 


■M 


l-H CL) 




o 


cd 


-C 


c 


•H 


CD 


13 


-a 


10 


S 






4-J 


-a 


CJ 


1 — 1 




e 


!h 


cd 


a) 


13 


•-H 


U 


fH 


cd 


Cd i-H 


L0 


■H 


U-i 


o 


cd 


- 


x: 


O 


o 


C 


CD 


13 


to 


•H 





•H 


cfl 


-a 


• H 


CD 


X3 


13 


<U 


a> 


CD 


X3 


■ — i 


E ^ 


+-> 


E 


3 


cd 


!h 


~ 


■M 


o 


p 


cd 


L0 





e 


C 


tH 


X 


■M 


o 


c 


> 


O 


3 


C 


3 


C 


- 


a> 


•H cd 


cd 


<D 


C 


S 


E- 


OJ 


o 


o 


E 


fH 


r-H 


• rH 


R 


3 


O 





O 


o 


< 





E- 


fn 


l-H 


u. 


• H 


J 


oJ 


C +J 


u- 


-C 


cd 












O 


E- 





L+H 


< 


£ 


E 


> 


H 


PL, 




DQ 




U 






S 






< 




u 


S 












u 

















-192- 



en 
o 

C 
<-i 
o 



p 


• 


rt 




CD 


cn 


H 


• 


S 




p 


a 


^< 


0) 


[/) 


^ 




p 


p 


i-{ 


3 


rt 


a. 


3 




a> 


33 


3 


P 


rt 


|-j 




~r 


O 


c 


t-h 


4 




oo 


rt 


V* 


3- 




a> 


> 




rt- 


> 


i — i 


4 


P 


3 


3 


X 


rt 


* 


P< 




O 


n 




o 


n 


^ 


o 


n-j 


p: 


w 


1/1 




r+ 


o 


* 


i-h 




m 


h- ■ 


3 


CO (TO 


o> 


H- 


si 


3 


• 


ft) 




CD 




4 




C/> 



CD 

cr 
o 

CD 

n 
o 

3 
3 

CD 
H 
o 

CD 

O 
rt> 



CD 



CD 



CO 

rt 
P 



T3 
P 
4 



n n -a t— 



o co 



33** J '"J03>-Jpi-' 

i-hp cd 3 </> cr o h- no 



2 r- 



Hum 



o 

3 
O CD 
CD i-S 



4 Wti 

rt O <• CD 
>-S C rt- 

JD 7) W 

rt- OP 

CD O I— ' 1/5 

00 i-j < I 

• CD CD 

oo 3 



n~j CD 
P 



o 

o 

7? 



d-3 3" 

c c 

O 2 4 

rt- H- H- 

W) t— • O 



n p h- cd i-i c 

O 3 3 X O cjq 

3 OQ CD O 3 

O P 00 CD » 
CD 3 rt- -cj 

O rt CO 



tn 
n 



> 
o 



CD 
00 

CD CD 00 CD 
3" CD 



t-j -a oo 3 d 

C H-n-j CD 

p a rt J B 

>-J CD O P rt 

3* t-> 

"O CD rt 

CD 00 - 

rt 



•-H o o pa 

-a 4 p h- cd n 

»— ■ o oo oo oo 

O rt H- 



P 



o 

h- 3 

O- O 



CD P 
10 



3 3 •- 



W CD 
00 



m 
o 



t/1 



co 

3" 
P 
T3 
CD 
00 



rt 

P 
>-i 

P 

3 



oo CO 

3* rt 

CD CD 

CD CD 

rt H-" 



C CD 

P 3 

I— • rt 

TT p 

C rt 

T) CD CD 

C t- 1 00 
CD 

i- 1 o 



CD 



i-t n 

4 O 
O P 

3 t— 

O P 
i-i 3 
CD P- 

P r- 
3 h- 
Q- era 

3 



kj w i>o 



nj 


NJ 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


*> 


-pi 


Cn 


Cn 


Cn 


On 


Cn 


0-N 


si 


o 


o 


i — i 


1— ' 


CM 


-pi 


oo 


o 


I— • 


nj 


cn 


CM 


Cn 


!—• 


t— ■ 


i— 1 


CO 


00 


I—" 


-j 


ON 


ON 


o 


CM 


Cn 


o 


On 


CM 


»— » 


<£> 


Cn 


00 


s] 


O 


-pi 


00 


i — i 


00 


oo 


oo 


I— 1 


--4 


-Pi 


<o 


00 


nj 


-J 


On 


o> 


CM 


00 


>—• 


•Pi 


-J 


«3 


I— 1 


!£J 


o 


si 


CM 


o 


«3 


& 


o 


CM 


00 


-pi 


cn 


cm 


ID 


00 


oo 


NJ 


o 


Cn 


ON 


ON 


00 


-J 


o 


1— ' 


NJ 


4- 


co 


NJ 


i— 1 


-pi 


i— • 


NJ 


ID 


si 


o 


CO 


Cn 


si 


N) 


on 


-pi 


r-o 


ON 


■P» 


NJ 


CM 


si 


S] 



NJ 

CM 

ON 

NJ 
si 
s] 



Cn 

cn 



[NJ 

CM 

s] 

\£> I— ' 

CM I— ' 

Cn \1 







to 




CM 




ON 


-^J 




O) 


4^ 


00 


Cn cn 


CM 


CM 




* 


V* •* 


\« 


>« 


O 


cn 


CM O 


ON 


-~J 


O 


00 


-Pi INJ 


ON 


-pi 


I— • 


KD 


<£> 00 


IC 


1— ' 



CM 



K) 

00 00 

cn 
O 
-Pi CM cn 



o 



--J ON 

ON O 

Cn ^j 



-Pi 


Cn fsj 


-pi cn 


Cn 


t— ' C^J 


^J CM 


^J 


O I- 1 


-Pi O 


k« 


N* \# 


to to 


CM 


CM O 


Cn i— > 


Cn 


00 NJ 


K) <D 


VO 


-Pi ^ 


h- ' 1— ' 



ON 





CM 


tj 


-J 


t\J 


CM 


o 


t— ' 


CM 



o 

CM 

v* 

CM 
00 
00 



cn ro 

<~D to 

t— ' 00 

■^1 ON 

CM cn 

-Pi t-> 



to to 

Cn i— 1 

K> K) CM 

O n! 0O 

K) K) 00 

K) -Pi CM 

H OO H 







ON 






o 






ta 




hJ 


CM 


CM 


ON 


cn 


00 


ON 


O 







CM 


l— • 


on 


-Pi 


i — i 


O 


*-J 


to 


to 


to 


ON 


Cn 


co 


I — 1 


CM 


to 


CM 


on 


Cn 



O I— ' K> 

-Pi 00 3 

si ON H 

si CO 00 

ON O S] 

-Pi -pi NJ 



hr-> 


Cn 


00 K) 


CM 


K> *i 


<r> 



K) 

ON 
ON 

s] 
Si 



-Pi 

o 



-pi 

ON 



-pi 

(NJ 

O 
t— ■ 

ON 



-Pi Si 

Cn on 
Cn 00 



O 
CM 

CM 

o 

Cn 







00 Cn -pi 


Cn 




NJ 


1 — i t— ' CM 


00 


t— ' 1 — ' 


si 


O CM H^ 


CM 


to to 


to 


to to to 


>« 


NJ ON 


o 


00 Cn M 


ON 


CM CM 


CM 


<£> -Pi NJ 


ON 


KO i— • 


00 


NJ 00 CO 


to 





1 ' 






(— ' 




i — ' 


NJ 


NJ 






o 




CM 


ON 


CM 


oo 


N) 


-pi 




oo 


CO 




NJ 


ON 


-pi 


CM 


si 


ON 




*m 


to 




to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


>- 




cn o 


Cn 


CO 


o 


CM 


N) 


-pi 


CM 


o 




Cm Cn 


00 


CM 


NJ 


-pi 


cn 


-pi 


ID 


cn 




si kj 


00 
NJ 


l\J 


00 


CM 


I— ' 


oo 


-Pi 

I — i 


ON 
ON 


ON 

oo 




i— 1 










t— ' 


3 


VO 


1 — 1 


<r> 


CM 






NJ 




oo 


CO 


ON 


-pi 


to 


to 






to 




N* 


*• 


to 


to 


I— 1 


sj 






t— ' 




CD 


CM 


-pi 


CM 


-Pi 


Cn 






CM 




t—> 


ON 


00 


o 


1— ■ 


-Pi 






CO 




O 


NJ 


o 


00 



I-H 


-n 


2 


o 


^3 


pa 


O 


m 


30 


i — i 


H 


o 


CO 


z 


m 


T1 


X 


o 


T3 


pa 


O 


m 


30 


i — i 


H 


a 


CO 


z 


?o 


n 


m 


o 


n 


> 


rn 


CO 


I-H 


H 


T3 


S 


H 


t— i 


CO 


CO 




m 


CO 


n 


rn 


o 


t— i 


> 


-a 


CO 


s? 


H 


m 


S 


z 


i — i 


H 


CO 


CO 


m 


30 


i — i 


m 


z 


n 


H 


m 


m 


I-H 


§ 


H 


> 


CO 


r- 1 


CO 


i — i 


I 


z 


1 — 1 


H 


X) 


m 


s 


pa 


m 


z 


z 


> 


H 


t— 


CO 




1— 




o 




n 




> 




t— 





193- 



NO. 157 



WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE PRINCIPAL WATERWAYS IN MARYLAND, 
IN SHORT TONS: 1967 AND 1959 



TONNAGE 



WATERWAY 



1967 



1959 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1959/1967 



Total Principal Waterways 

Baltimore Harbor and Channels 

Total Other Principal 
Waterways 

Chester River, Maryland 
Tred Avon River, Maryland 
Choptank River, Maryland 
Cambridge Harbor, Maryland 
Nanticoke River, Delaware 

and Maryland 
Wicomico River, Maryland 

(Eastern Shore) 
Crisfield Harbor, Maryland 
Pocomoke River, Maryland 
Chincoteague Bay, Maryland 

and Virginia 
On the Coast of Virginia, 

from Chesapeake Bay to 

Chincoteague Bay, Virginia 



42,759,411 41,517,566 
40,737,903 40,223,607 



2,021,508 


1,293,959 


60,226 


52,292 


140,307 


86,901 


302,024 


116,370 


122,681 


78,829 



383,652 

722,448 

29,904 

176,669 

4,859 



78,738 



280,540 

452,287 
45,460 
55,775 

26,757 



98,748 



3.0 
1.3 

56.2 

15.2 

61.5 

159.5 

55.6 

36.8 

59.7 
-34.2 
216.8 

-81.9 
-20.3 



Source: U. S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, "Waterborne Commerce of 
the United States: Part I, Waterways and Harbors, Atlantic Coast," 1967. 



194- 



D. 158 



WATERBORNE COMMERCE OF THE BALTIMORE HARBOR AND CHANNELS, 
IN SHORT TONS: 1959-1967 



(1) 



YEAR 



TONNAGE 



PASSENGERS 



1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 
1963 
1962 
1961 
1960 
1959 



40,737,903 
43,876,778 
44,267,160 
48,220,024 
43,197,300 
42,587,893 
37,814,650 
43,419,627 
40,223,607 



178,974 
166,123 
128,324 

93,392 
111,275 
267,773 

47,824 
251,359 
293,331 



Section included is the mouth of the Patapsco River to Baltimore, Maryland, 



mrce: U. S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, "Waterborne Commerce 
of the United States: Part I, Waterways and Harbors, Atlantic Coast," 
1967. 



195- 



AIR TRAVEL 

Baltimore's Friendship International Airport reflects the growth of air 
travel in this decade. Total passengers handled in 1968 show an increase of nearly 
290 per cent over the corresponding statistic for 1960. Likewise, express and 
freight poundage has increased 136 per cent and 520 per cent respectively. To 
further show the growth of the facility from an operational standpoint, itinerant 
civilian operations have increased over this period by more than 126 per cent. 

Concurrent with the growth at Friendship, a listing of the commercial 
airports and heliports in the state shows 44 such facilities, located in 22 of 
the state's 24 subdivisions, with scheduled operations at Baltimore (Friendship 
International), Hagerstown, and Salisbury. 



-196- 



NO. 159 COMMERCIAL AIRPORTS 


AND 


HELIPORTS IN THE STATE OF MARYLAND, 






BY 


POLITICAL 


SUBDIVISION: 1968 


Allegany 










Harford 


Cumberland 
Mexico Farms 

Anne Arundel 










Aberdeen 

Aldino 

Fallston 


Annapolis (Lee) 
Deep Creek 
Friendship 










Kent 

Gill 
Russell 


Baltimore City 










Montgomery 


Baltimore Seaplane 
Pier 4, Pratt St. 


(He 


liport) 




Davis 

Montgomery County Airpark 


Baltimore 










Prince George's 


Essex Skypark 
Quinn White Marsh 
Martin 

Caroline 

Pelican Field 










Beltsville 

College Park 

Free Way 

Hyde Field 

Prince George's Airpark, Inc. 

Suburb an 


Carroll 










Queen Anne's 


Clearview 










Bay Bridge 
Kentmorr 



Westminster 

Cecil 

Cecil County AirPark, Inc, 
Farmington 

Charles 

Aqua- Land Sky Park 
Maryland 

Dorchester 
Cambridge 

Frederick 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Garrett County 



St. Mary's 

Park Hill/Lexington Park 
Piney Point 

Somerset 
Crisfield 

Talbot 

Easton 

Tilghman-Whipp Airport and Seaplane 
Base 

Washington 

Hag erst own 
Wicomico 

Salisbury 
Worcester 

Ocean City 



Source: Maryland State Aviation Commission, "Maryland Airport Directory," 1968 

-197- 



NO. 160 



FRIENDSHIP INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT OPERATIONS: 1968 AND 1960 



TYPE OF OPERATION 



1968 



1960 



PER CENT CHANGE 
1960/1968 



Total Passengers 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 
Chartered 

Total Express (Pounds) 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 

Total Freight (Pounds) 
Deplaning 
Enplaning 

Total Air Traffic Operations 
Itinerant (1) 

Commercial Carrier 

Civil 

Armed Forces 
Local ( 2 ) 

Armed Forces 
Civil (3) 



2,910,158 




746,690 


289.7 


1,437,772 




370,301 


288.3 


1,443,103 




376,389 


283.4 


29,283 




- 


- 


8,183,986 


3 


,465,801 


136.1 


4,398,586 


1 


,881,919 


133.7 


3,785,400 


1 


,583,882 


139.0 


80,029,825 


12 


,902,035 


520.3 


41,867,743 


7 


,702,637 


443.6 


38,162,082 


5 


,199,398 


634.0 


226,576 




188,447 


20.2 


212,664 




110,003 


93.3 


118,021 




49,302 


139.4 


91,283 




43,146 


111.6 


3,360 




17,555 


- 80.9 


13,912 




78,444 


- 82.3 


3,816 




55,316 


- 93.1 


10,096 




23,128 


- 56.4 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 



With origin or destination beyond the local tower. 
Remaining under control of the local tower. 



Includes airline personnel familiarization operations 
Source: The Airport Board of Baltimore. 



198- 



AGRICULTURE 

Maryland, like most other areas of the United States, and especially the 
"megalopolis" states, has been undergoing a shift from rural agricultural living 
and employment to urban manufacturing and service employment. 

Accordingly, the land devoted to farming and the number of farms have 
been steadily declining. In the period from 1964 to 1969, the land in farms 
has declined from 3,550,000 acres to 3,250,000 acres while the number of farms 
in the State has declined from 23,600 to 18,700. A natural corollary here 
has been the decline in farm workers, to an annual average of 33,000 in 1968, 
including family and hired workers. 

The largest sources of farm income are livestock and livestock products, 
which, in 1967, accounted for slightly more than two-thirds of the value 
of all agricultural commodities in Maryland. The dominance of this category 
is due primarily to dairy products and poultry. Cattle and calves, eggs, and 
hogs are important, but they represent substantially smaller elements. In the 
same year field crops accounted for approximately 21 per cent of the receipts 
from all commodities, led by corn, tobacco, and soy beans. At the same time 
vegetables and melons, as well as greenhouse and nursery products were im- 
portant sources of farm income in the State. 

Prices received by farmers have improved quite substantially in the 
period from 1964 to 1969. Using a base period of 1947-1956 to equal 100 
the index number for all commodities rose from 84.8 in 1964 to 103.1 in 1969. 
Likewise the all crops index rose over the same time period from 96.2 to 110.9 
while an index based on livestock and livestock products went from 79.7 to 99.4. 



199 



NO. 161 



CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARMING, MARYLAND: 1967, 1966, 1965 



COMMODITY 



1967( 2 ) 1966(1) 1965 
($1,000) ($1,000) ($1,000) 



ALL CROPS 



$180,564 $102,473 



$113,880 



(3) 



Corn 

Tobacco 

Soybeans 

Wheat 

Tomatoes 

Apples 

Hay 

Snap beans 

Sweet corn 

Cucumbers 

Barley 

Sweet potatoes 

Green peas 

Asparagus 

Peaches 

Potatoes 

Spinach 

Watermelons 

Strawberries 

Lima beans 

Cantaloupes 

Other vegetables & melons 

Other field crops ( 4 ) 

Other fruits ( 5 ) 

Total field crops (6) 

Total vegetables £j melons ( 7 ) 

Total fruit( 8 ) 

(9) 

Forest products 

Greenhouse and nursery 

LIVESTOCK AND PRODUCTS 

Dairy products 

Broilers 

Cattle § calves 

Hogs 

Eggs 

Turkeys 

Farm chickens 

Honey 

Sheep § lambs 

Wool 

Other(lO) 



25,720 


20,054 


17,486 


25,174 


12,026 


8,897 


6,246 


6,117 


4,820 


5,023 


3,785 


2,596 


3,361 


2,948 


2,593 


2,346 


2,259 


1,224 


2,216 


2,659 


1,839 


1,435 


1,456 


1,245 


1,311 


1,702 


1,138 


1,050 


848 


667 


797 


768 


792 


646 


702 


1,129 


689 


645 


489 


302 


165 


382 


2,941 


1,611 


807 


808 


472 


315 


69,688 


67,446 


19,426 


18,074 


5,794 


4,223 


1,691 


1,829 


11,965 


10,901 


89,169 


83,925 


83,219 


99,364 


25,547 


23,845 


9,441 


9,618 


9,190 


11,174 


690 


1,023 


49 


676 


417 


366 


173 


221 


56 


71 


1,172 


1,082 



25. 


936 


26 


162 


11 


724 


4. 


567 


4 


944 


3 


404 


3 


304 


3 


471 


2 


349 


2 


,053 


1 


,555 


1 


,412 


1 


,685 




955 


1 


,275 


1 


,144 




695 




835 




569 




554 




330 


1 


,505 




762 




350 


76 


,566 


19 


,376 


5 


,598 


2 


,199 


10 


,141 


78 


,050 


89 


,114 


23 


,819 


9 


,189 


10 


,058 


1 


,110 




625 




281 




322 




84 


1 


,103 



(continued on following page) 



•200- 



NO. 161 CASH RECEIPTS FROM FARMING, MARYLAND: 1967, 1966, 1965 (Cont'd.) 



- COMMODITY 












1967 
($1,000) 


1966 
($1,000) 


1965 
($1,000) 


All commodities 












$328,087 


$330,838 


$327,635 


Government payments 












5,317 


5,515 


6,197 


Total Receipts 












333,404 


336,358 


333,832 


^Revised. 


















(2) . . 

Preliminary. 


















(3) 

5 Beets, broccoli, 


cabb; 


age, k 


ale, 


peppers 


and 


others . 






(4) 

Rye, oats, lespedeza, 


seed, 


red 


clover 


seed, 


popcorn, 


and miscell 


aneous crops . 


Miscellaneous fruits, 


berries and nuts. 










Includes potatoes 


and 


sweet 


pot 


atoes . 










Excludes potatoes 


and 


sweet 


pot 


atoes . 










(8) 

Includes strawberries 

















(9) 

Includes maple sugar and syrup. 

Miscellaneous livestock and poultry, and livestock and poultry products, beeswax, 
horses and mules. 

Source: Maryland State Board of Agriculture, Department of Markets, Publication 
No. 32, "Maryland Agricultural Statistics" June 1969, p. 62. 



201- 



NO. 162 SELECTED COMMODITIES INDICES, PRICES RECEIVED BY FARMERS, MARYLAND 



1964-1969 



(1) 



(1947-1956 = 100) 



YEAR 



ALL COMMODITIES 



ALL CROPS 



LIVESTOCK AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 



1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 



103.1 
96.1 
94.6 
96.0 

87.7 
84.8 



110.9 
103.0 
108.0 
107.0 
96.1 
96.2 



99.4 
92.9 
88.2 
91.0 
83.7 
79.7 



m 

v 'Annual Average. 

Sources: Mary land- Del aware Crop Reporting Service, "Monthly Price Report, Maryland 
Agricultural Prices," monthly, 1969. 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture, Department of Markets, Publication 
No. 32, "Maryland Agricultural Statistics," June 1969, p. 60. 



NO. 163 






NUMBER OF FARMS AND LAND IN FARMS, MARYLAND: 1964-1969 



(1) 



YEAR 



NUMBER OF FARMS 



LAND IN FARMS (1,000 ACRES) 



1969 
1968 
1967 
1966 
1965 
1964 



(2) 



18,700 
19,500 
20,400 
21,300 
23,000 
23,600 



3,250 
3,300 
3,350 
3,400 
3,500 
3,550 






Official estimate of Maryland-Del aware Crop Reporting Service 



(1) 

(2) . . 

Preliminary. 

Source: Maryland State Board of Agriculture, Department of Markets, "Maryland 
Agricultural Statistics," Publication No. 32, June 1969, p. 65. 



NO. 164 



WORKERS ON FARMS IN MARYLAND: 1966-1968 



(1) 



TYPE 



1968 



1967 



1966 



Family Workers 
Hired Workers 
Total 



25,000 

8,000 

33,000 



26,000 
10,000 
36,000 



28,000 
11,000 
39,000 



Annual Average. 

Source: Maryland State Board of Agriculture, Department of Markets, "Maryland Ag- 
ricultural Statistics," Publication No. 32, June 1969, p. 65. 



-202- 



CO 


, — * 


f 


O 


IS) 


h 


c 


1 — ' 




4 


a 


n3 


o 


o 


4 


A 


cd 


CD 




w 






3 


3 


Co 2 


O 


H' 


rt p 


rt 


3 


P H 




P 


H *< 


H- 


4 


H> t— ' 


3 


•< 


(/) P 


O 


• 


rt 3 


t— ■ 




H- (X 


c 




O 


p. 




</> co 


0) 




>• rt 






= P 


o 




r+ 


o 




C-. CD 


3 




C 


3 




3 CD 


0) 




CD O 


4 




v. p 


o 




4 


H' 




i- 1 p. 


P 




<0 


t— i 




O O 






U3 Hi 


cr 




*■ 


4 




> 


o 




*d (TO 


H- 




• 4 


l— 1 




H- 


CD 




to o 


4 




i- c 


c/> 




»— ■ 


• 




rt 






C 






4 






ffi 






* 






a 






CD 






T3 






P 






4 






rt 






3 






0) 






3 






rt 






o 






Hi 






2 






P 






4 






7T 






a> 







"3 

C 

cr 



cm 

K) 



P 

4 

i—" 
P 

3 

a. 
> 

<ra 
4 

(-»• 

O 

C 











> 








co 


> 




















> 










i— > 








3 d 


i—" 




















h- • 


H 


O 


5 


I 


i—" 


S. 


m po 


tn 


CD 


H-l 


DO 


tn 


o 


O 




O 


I I 




2 


t— • 


C 


rt 


c 


CD 




CD 


s: p 


€ 


CD 




c 


rl 


rt 


rt 


P 


rt 


CD CD 


p 


H- 




4 


3' 


»— ' 


3 


TJ 


rt 


CD 3 


CD 


>3 


X 


h- 1 


CD 


sr 


3 d 


3 


3 


H- H- 


3 


I— 1 


n 


W 


a> 


»— • 


(/> 


P 


3" 


tyi 


(/> 




o 


1 — i 


CD 


ro 


CD 


CL 


CD 


Hi Hi 


P- 


7T 


p 


n> 


4 


to 




4 


CD 


i — i 




P 


(TO 


C/> 


4 


4 


4 




4 


CD CD 






rt 


■< 




rt 




3 


4 


p »— ' 


t— i 


3 


c/i 




t/i 






O 




4 4 


O 


O 


rt 


en 


o 


i/> 








3 




CL 




1 — I 




O 


3* 


H- ' 


O 


l/l 


i — i 


o 


1— ' 




3" 






n 


P 


crx 


X 




p 




i — i 


P 


CD 


P. 


o 


O 


P. 


s: 


CD 




H- 






3* 


3 


(/) CD 


CD 


r- 


3 


*< 




i — i 


H» 


CD 


s: 


p i— i 


CO 


v) 






o 






H- 


P- 


P 


P 


P 


P. 


CD 


*< 


< 


Hi 


4 


V) 


h- ' I 


4 




P 




^ 






o 




4 


4 


3 




P 


CD 


CD 


CD 






< to 




p 


3 




CD 






7? 


4 






cr 


T3 


4 


P 


(SI 


4 




p 


CD 




3 


p- 




3 






CD 


P 


P 


P 


c/> 


H- 




4 




(/) 




3 


(/> v< 




P. 






w 






3 


3 


3 


3 




OQ 


P 










P. 


CD 






n 










c/> 




p. 


P- 




(/) 


3 


P 




i— ' 






cr p 




3 d 


p 










/ — \ 


t— i 










P- 


3 




i 




3" 


CD 4 




CD 


»— » 










K> 


P 


o 


O 








P- 




K) 




CD 


H- (/) 




H- 


< 










*. — s 


3 


i— i 


t— ■ 






O 










H< 


3 




H) 


CD 












cr 


pu 


P- 






»— ' 


O 




X 




hi era ?r 




CD 


(/) 












t/i 


CD 
4 


CD 
4 






p. 

CD 
4 


i — i 
P< 
CD 

4 




CD 
P 
4 




CD 

4 
t/i 

CD 
P 
4 
(/) 


ept for mil 
kept for m 




4 
(/) 

tsj 

CD 
P 
4 
(/> 





H(J\ W «3 00 
(DO U (J> (O 



h- 1 K) t— > t/1 





l— 1 




I—" 


^. 


1— " 


00 


CM W K) On 


-fc> -P^ 00 


t— ■ 


U3 


1 — 1 


■si 00 K) W -^ 


O O -fc. 


00 



NJ -J 


O 


y- ■ On J^ O 


O 


VD O >— ' 00 


^D 





I— ' 




t— ' 


-t^ 


I— ' 


ON 


w w wai 


■P^ W 00 


K) 


IP 


00 


^J 00 CnI w -&> 


K) (O C> 


K) 



>— • On (O 
tsj On ^J --J t— ' 
K) Cn 00 O W 



H W H Ol <0 



1— ' 




1—" 


-P* 


ON 


O-l W K> Cn 


-P* -(^ U3 


h- 1 


00 


■^4 On tsJ 1— ' (NO 


O O O 


00 



K) On UO 
K) On -P^ -t^. cn 
<£> On K) -Pi> K) 



i— ' to i— 1 On 





h- ' 




(—• 


-Pi 


K) 


-Pi 


CM CM I— • Cn 


-pi -P* (£> 


l—" 


o 


o 


-O Cn O ~0 O 


t— • O 00 


00 



-Pi On t— i 
I— ' On CM ^-4 On 
<£) O O I— ' t— ' 



00 





t— ' 




tNj 


-pi 


to 


CM 


CM cm i— • cn 


-pi .£> o 


CM 


CM 


(D 


si 00 W (D W 


1— ' t— ■ o 


I— 1 



-Pi On 


I— 1 






t—' 




to 


-Pi 


M Ul H si 


Cn 


I — i 


IS) 


cn 


CM CM m cn 


-Pi -Pi H' 


-Pi 


ts) 00 On 00 


K) 


1— " CM t— ' VO 


-pi 


00 


si 00 On (£> O 


NJslO 


«3 



in 

m 
n 

m 
cn 



n 
> 

CO 
CO 



o 



On 

Cn 







I I- 1 


l—l 


m «■ 


(O 


> o 


On 


a o 


<£> 


<s O 


/ — \ 




i— • 




v / 


H t— ■ 


1— ' 


m » 


vo 


> o 


On 


a o 


00 


N_/ O 




1 \ 




"X. y~- 


1— ' 


tn >• 


<£> 


> o 


On 


a o 


sj 


^ o 




/ N 




X hj 


l— 1 


tn «• 


VO 


> o 


ON 


a o 


ON 


v — ' o 








■X h-i 


1— ' 


tn «• 


<£> 


> o 


ON 


a o 


cn 


N_/ O 








X 1— ' 


i—" 


tn - 


<I3 


> o 


On 


o o 


-Pi 


— ' o 





< 

tn 

CO 

H 
o 
n 



o 

c 
t- 

H 



t- 1 



t-i 



CO 

tn 
o 

21 

> 



CO 



On 
-pi 

I 

h-< 

(O 
On 
CO 



-203- 



en 
en 



en 



n 


CO 
PJ 
1— 1 

u 
tu 




CO 




>H 


5 


UJ 




3 


■Mi 


►j 




< 


- ■ 


> 


1 J 






a 




z; 




< 


1 * 


j 




>- 




a: 
< 



OS 

H 

O 



U 

o 

E- 

CO 

UJ 

> 

I— I 






a 

oi < , 

tu in w 

a, x. - 



o 

-J o 

< o 
E- - 

O rH 



Q 
OS < /-^ 

ffl B» 



a 

a: < ^ 

www 



o 

o 
o 



a 
PJ PJ -&e- 



o 
>-j o 
< o 
E- - 
O —i 
E— -&e- 



Q 

OS < ,-s 



J o 

< o 

E- O 

O - 

E- ^H 
■fee 



Q 

OS < r~, 
UJ WW 



o 
o 
o 



CO 
UJ 
I — I 

u 

PJ 

Cu 
CO 



o 
o 

\D 

o 
-<=e 



o 

CM 

LO 

-&e 



•=* 
cm 

00 

■be- 



in 

o 

o 

tO 

00 

■fee- 



CD 
oo 



00 

■&e 



t— i 
cm 

LO 

Cn 

fee 



o 
o 



CM 

"3" 



oo 

LO 

to 



o 
o 

00 
tO 

oo 

LO 



o 
o 

f> 

vO 

vo 
o 

00 

en 

vO 



o 
o 



Cn 



(N 

00 



o 
o 

00 

&■ 

1—1 

en 

oo 
r-. 



o 
o 

vO 

o 

CN 

00 

o 



vO 
00 



o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


00 


en 


to 


en 


LO 


CM 


to 


i-H 


-* 


00 


cm 


■—I 






1— 1 










o 


CM 


-* 


00 


00 


LO 


o 


to 


en 


o 


oo 


\Q 


to 


t~"s 


i-H 


^ 


m, 




•* 




00 


to 




CM 




to 










o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


to 


1—1 


to 


to 


LO 


CM 


"!fr 


i-H 


LO 


00 


CM 


1— 1 


r— 1 




t— 1 










o 


o 


<* 


r-> 


i-H 


o 


o 


CM 


i—i 


o 


o 


1—1 


to 


en 


1—1 


♦s 


•* 




** 




r-* 


to 




CM 




to 










O 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


en 


en 


to 


vD 


o 


r-~ 


v£> 


1 — 1 


LO 


CM 


to 


i — i 






CM 










O 


vO 


00 


LO 


CM 


vO 


o 


to 


to 


vO 


LO 


to 


to 


^D 


i—i 


*N 


*» 




•\ 




tO 


LO 




CM 




■<* 










o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


LO 


00 


to 


CM 


o 


o 


t^ 


i-H 


vO 


<3- 


to 


i-H 






CM 










o 


"vf 


oo 


to 


vO 


o 


CM 


to 


00 


to 


vO 


i— 1 


to 


LO 


i-H 


»\ 


*v 




•V 




LO 


LO 




CM 




'tf 










o 


O 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


to 


o 


to 


«* 


o 


o 


en 


1 — 1 


LO 


v£> 


to 


i—i 






CM 










o 


o 


i-H 


CM 


to 


vO 


en 


vO 


i-H 


o 


to 


o 


to 


r-~ 


. — 1 


i 


** 




•N 




00 


LO 




CM 




■"3- 










o 


o 


o 


O 


LO 


o 


1 — 1 


to 


LO 


vO 


o 


1—1 


o 


i—l 


LO 


en 


to 


CM 






r\i 










o 


en 


vO 


«* 


r-. 


vO 


CM 


00 


00 


o 


to 


^O 


to 


en 


1—1 


»* 


•* 




»* 




to 


LO 




CM 




LO 



















<fl 




















f* 




















03 








1 v 










T3 









l/> 


CM 






T3 




C 


X 






X) 


' — ' 






C 




n3 






</) 


6 


(/) 






o3 






CM 


$H 


bO 


03 


c 










(/) 




0) 


•H 


hJ 














S 


I/) 


TJ 


a, 




^ 


, V 




i-H 




O 


u 


i-H 




T3 


o 


to 




4-> 




o 





O 


t3 


C 


•H 


V — ' 




+J 


if) 




cw 




c 


03 


X 


<Sl 




03 


CD 


M 


■H 


T3 


a3 




u 


X 


i-H 


U 


> 


i-H 


0) 


c 




P* 







o3 




i — 1 


•H 


-C 


o3 


to 


Ct) 


e 


^ 


4-J 


i— i 


o3 


S 






bo 





h 


U 


O 


i-H 


U 








O 


X 


o3 


3 


E- 


< 










X 


CO 


P_ 


H 









03 








U 








3 








+J 








i—i 








3 








o 








•H 








!h 








bO 








< 








T3 








C 








03 








i—i 








X 








U 








03 








2 








^ 








^ 








CM 








to 








o 








2 








C 








o 








•H 








+J 








03 








O 








•H 








i-H 








X 








3 








Cu 








•V 








V) 








4-> 

















r* 








H 








03 








S 








CH 








O 








4-> 








c 

















6 








4-> 








JH 








03 








P. 

















a 








„ 

















^ 








3 








+-> 




• 




i-H 




W 




3 -< 




fH 




O CM 









•H 




i-H 




^ • 




•H 




M CL, 




O 


• 


< 




^ 


to 


•s 




X 


U 


4-i en 









O vO 




i-H 


X 


cn 




03 


Jh 


13 rH 




•H 


cm 


^1 




O 




o3 •> 




fn 


X 


O 










CQ C 




g 


J*6 


3 




s 


U 


i-j 




O 


1 


4-> 




O 


+J 


o3 r 










CO w 




13 


T3 


u 




3 


3 


13 -H 




i— i 


i— i 


C -M 


. 


a 


O 


03 t/5 


X 


C 


C 


i—l -H 


U 


• H 


•H 


X -M 


03 






f-i 03 


C 


■M 


■M 


03 4-> 


■H 


O 


O 


S CO 


6 


c 


c 




•H 








i-H 


(/) 


tn 


• • 














^ 


o 


o 


o 


Cu 


Q 


a 


^ 




/ — s 


/- \ 


3 


H 


CM 


to 


o 




1 — ' 


V ' 


CO 



•204- 



CONSTRUCTION 

While there has been the inevitable decline in construction from the 
eak years of 1965 in all phases, the construction activity has been of a strong 
nature since the sixties began. The total construction contract ratio of 
Maryland to the Nation stood in 1967 at 2.2, a figure above that for the state's 
population and personal income as a percentage of United States totals. In 
absolute dollars, more than $1.1 billion dollars of construction contract work 
was actually done, with residential and non-residential construction accounting 
for approximately 75 per cent of the total. The value of construction contracts 
in residential and non-residential areas increased by 24.4 per cent in the 
period from 1960 to 1968. Certainly construction, in light of these figures, 
is a major economic force in the Maryland economy. 

Although Maryland is not a major mobile home area, there is a small 
but steady demand for this type of housing. Since 1960 16,560 new mobile homes 
were shipped into the State. 



•205- 



CO 

o 

c 

H 

o 



< -n 



</> o 

o 

^ P- 

CD 09 

p cd 

w n 
• o 

3 

s 



a 
o 

P- 
C/Q 
CD 

n 

o 

3 
(/) 
r+ 
H 
C 
o 

r+ 

o 

3 

CO 
r+ 

r+ 

H- 
C/> 
r+ 

H- 
O 
(/) 



PO 
CD 
C/Q 
H- 

o 

3 



03 

c 



a 

a> 
o 
cd 

3 
cr 

CD 
H 



t/i 

C 
CD 
(/) 

O 



tO 
ON 
O 



Cn 



tO 
ON 



CM 

O 



tO 

ON 



to 



to 

ON 

cm 



CM 

00 



to <o 

On On 

.&> Cn 



CM 
cn 

to 



cn 



to 

O^ 
On 



-P» 

O 



to to 

ON ON 

-J 00 



o 

to 



-P* 


K) 


00 


■^J 


-P> 


ON 


oo 


en tj 


ON 


K) 


I— 1 


o 


to 


o 


o 


1— c 


ON 


^J 


to 


** 


to 


CM 


-p. 


CM c 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



-p» 

K) 



cr- 

o 

o 
o 



o 
^1 



o 



ON 

o 



CM 



00 



-J 

CM 



00 
CM 



en 

-p> 



CM 

o 



INJ 

00 

o 



CM -P» 

CM O 

NJ en 



-P* 

to 



ON ON 

K) 00 

-P» INJ 



en 

to 



-p» 

-P* 
Cn 



00 


-~J 


en 


CM 


K) 


CM 


t— 1 


--J c 


-Pa. 


CM 


^j 


to 


00 


en 


o 


en 


to 


4> 


INJ 


o 


^1 


ON 


o 


en e 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 

o 



o 
o 
o 



-P» 

en 

On 

oo 
->] 
to 

o 
o 

o 



00 
-P» 



CM 

t— I 
00 



INJ 



to 

CM 



CM 



en 



o 

On 



ON ON 

4i> to 

K) -J 



oo 
to 



to I— ■ to 

00 O 00 

CM ^J t— I 



oo 
en 
en 



oo 

00 



*» 


to 


CM 


o 


~^l 


to 


to 


K) 


00 


K) 


ON 


to 


to 


00 


en 


o 


ON 


-P* 


en 


I— 1 


>— > 


-p* 


ON 


to 


-P> 


00 


en 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



o 

o 
o 



en 



to 
o 



oo 



ON 



to 









O "O 








< cr 


1 






m to 








TO 


h- • 




-< 


n 


tsj 


K) 


m 


td rr 




• 


> 


TO 2 


to 


oo 


pa 


T CHANGE 
EVIOUS 



2 

O 
2 

i 

TO 

cn 
co 
t— i 
o 

CD 
2 

H 
i— i 
> 



o 

< 



m 
cn po 

TO 



n 

is m 

TO 

cn H 
< 

>-* n 

o I 



co 



TO 

cn 
co 

a 
m 

2 

H 
i— i 
> 



o -o 

< cn 

cn to 

to 

~< n 

cn T3 cn 

> to 2 

po cn H 

< 



H 
O 
H 
> 

pa 
cn 
co 



< 
> 

> 

H 

I — I cn 

O 

2 2 
O 
2 
i 



206- 



NO. 168 NEW BUILDING PERMITS FOR PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNITS 

AUTHORIZED IN MARYLAND: 1964-1968, 1959 



PRIVATE RESIDENTIAL PER CENT CHANGE 

YEAR DWELLING UNITS OVER PREVIOUS YEAR 

1968 31,427 - 1.1 

1967 31,789 - 27.8 

1966 43,997 - 18.1 

1965 53,707 25.3 

1964 42,870 58.7 

1959 27,006 

Source: Unpublished data supplied by the Maryland State Planning Department 



■207- 



NO. 169 VALUE OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS ^ FOR WORK COMPLETED IN THE UNITED 

STATES AND IN MARYLAND: 1965-1967, 1960 





JURISDICTION 


($1 


1967 
,000,000) 


1966 
($1,000,000) 


($1 


1965 
,000,000) 


($1 


1960 
,000,000) 


(2) 
United States^ ' 

Maryland 

Maryland As 
Per Cent of 
United States 


$ 


52,895 
1,140 

2.2 


$ 50,150 
1,164 

2.3 


$ 


49,272 
1,278 

2.6 


$ 


36,318 
706 

1.9 



(1) 



(2) 



Represents the sum of the value of residential building contracts, non-residential 
building contracts, and non-building construction contracts. 

Excludes Alaska and Hawaii. 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census, "Statistical Abstract of the United States: 
1968 (89th Ed.)." 



NO. 170 ANNUAL VALUE OF NON-RESIDENTIAL AND RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS 

AWARDED IN MARYLAND: 1960-1968 



Source: F. W. Dodge Company, "Dodge Construction Statistics, Region II Bulletin," 
December issues of various years. 



•208- 







TOTAL NON- 


PER CENT 




PER CENT 




PER CENT 
CHANGE OVER 




RESIDENTIAL § 


CHANGE OVER 


NON-RESI- 


CHANGE OVER 






RESIDENTIAL 


PREVIOUS 


DENTIAL 


PREVIOUS 


RESIDENTIAL 


PREVIOUS 


YEAR 


VALUATION 


YEAR 


VALUATION 


YEAR 


VALUATION 


YEAR 


1968 


$878,845,000 


2.8 


$421,966,000 


3.0 


$456,879,000 


2.5 


1967 


855,268,000 


- 12.9 


409,513,000 


1.7 


445,755,000 


- 23.0 


1966 


981,904,000 


- 11.4 


402,804,000 


- 5.4 


579,100,000 


- 15.1 


1965 


1,107,959,000 


1.2 


425,603,000 


18.3 


682,356,000 


9.3 


1964 


983,786,000 


11.9 


359,499,000 


- 7.3 


624,287,000 


27.0 


1963 


879,094,000 


26.0 


387,704,000 


32.8 


491,390,000 


21.1 


1962 


697,391,000 


8.4 


291,819,000 


- 6.0 


405,572,000 


31.8 


1961 


642,961,000 


- 9.0 


310,227,000 


20.4 


332,734,000 


18.4 


1960 


706,425,000 


- 5.2 


257,466,000 


- 0.7 


280,849,000 


- 17.1 



NO. 171 NEW HOUSING STARTS, MARYLAND: 1959-1969 







TOTAL SINGLE 








YEAR 


AND MULTIPLE 


UNITS 


INDEX (1967=100) 


SINGLE UNITS 


MULTIPLE UNITS 


1959 


26,600 




94.3 


NA 


NA 


1960 


21,500 




76.2 


NA 


NA 


1961 


30,700 




108.9 


NA 


NA 


1962 


37,300 




132.3 


NA 


NA 


1963 


48,900 




173.4 


NA 


NA 


1964 


42,200 




149.6 


NA 


NA 


1965 


53,700 




190.4 


23,600 


30,100 


1966 


44,400 




157.4 


18,000 


26,400 


1967 


28,200 




100.0 


14,600 


13,600 


1968 


29,200 




103.5 


14,500 


14,700 


1969 


28,900 




102.5 


15,000 


13,900 



Source: Unpublished data furnished by the National Association of Home 
Builders, April, 1970. 



■209- 



NO. 172 MOBILE HOME SHIPMENTS INTO MARYLAND: 1960-1969 



YEAR NUMBER INDEX (1967=100) CUMULATIVE 

1960 1,040 49.5 

1961 820 39.0 1,860 

1962 1,170 55.7 3,030 

1963 1,350 64.3 4,380 

1964 2,000 95.2 6,380 

1965 1,810 86.2 8,190 

1966 2,090 99.5 10,280 

1967 2,100 100.0 12,380 

1968 2,280 108.6 14,660 

1969 1,900 90.5 16,560 



Source: Unpublished estimates by the National Association of Home Builders, 
April, 1970. 



-210- 



REAL ESTATE 

The total assessed value of real property in Maryland in 1968 was 
$11,140,525,000, representing an increase of 15.7 per cent over that of 1966. As 
might be expected the greatest valuation occurs in Baltimore City and the metro- 
politan Counties of Montgomery, Baltimore, and Prince George's, in that descending 
rank. 

Strides have been made as between the local jurisdictions to achieve 
more uniformity in the assessment level ratios. The State average in 1968 was 54.4 
per cent, a reduced ratio from the 55.2 per cent level of five years previous, but 
up slightly from 1966, when the figure stood at 54.2 per cent. 

The federal government owns and leases substantial acreage and buildings 
in the State. The size of the federal operation is due, at least in part, to the 
proximity of Maryland to the District of Columbia. 

As of June 30, 1968, the federal government owned nearly 190,000 acres of 
land, and leased an additional 2,900 acres. An additional 12,187 buildings were 
owned as of that date, and some 722 buildings in Maryland were leased. Increases 
in both ownership and leasehold interests have occurred substantially in recent 
years . 



■211- 



NO. 173 



NUMBER OF REAL PROPERTIES AND REAL PROPERTY ASSESSED 
VALUES, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1968 



POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION 



NUMBER OF 
PROPERTIES 



ASSESSED VALUE 
REAL PROPERTY ($1,0 



Maryland 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



1,127,483 

33,352 

95,414 

231,955 

173,357 

12,372 

8,676 
19,830 
18,553 
13,352 
16,105 

29,492 
11,948 
30,601 
17,694 
9,789 

133,785 

149,636 

10,209 

14,402 

11,204 

9,473 
33,231 
25,652 
17,401 



Totals may not add due to rounding. 



$11,140,525 

189,071 

755,107 

2,051,685 

1,890,990 

54,418 

41,712 
177,475 
117,644 
114,209 

64,316 

239,211 

39,079 

291,458 

195,515 

53,527 

2,354,519 

1,720,024 

60,508 

80,309 

34,261 

86,237 
262,196 
156,089 
110,969 



Source: State of Maryland, State Department of Assessments and Taxation, "Twenty- 
Seventh Biennial Report," p. 15. 



■212- 



NO. 174 



REAL PROPERTY ASSESSMENT LEVEL RATIOS, BY POLITICAL 
SUBDIVISION: 1968, 1966, 1964 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION 



1968 



1966 



1964 



Maryland Average 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore 
Calvert 



54.4 

54. 8 
50.3 
58.4 
55.9 
50.6 



54.2 

53.2 
50.5 
58.0 
55.5 
50.6 



55.2 



53 

52 
60 
55 
50 



Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 



53.0 

52.7 
52.3 
52.0 
50.7 



50.1 
51.7 
50.7 
50.1 
51.7 



52.8 
51.1 
53.2 
51.5 
53.1 



Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 



54.4 
48.2 
52.4 
55.1 
50.5 



54.1 
48.0 
52.1 
55.6 
51.5 



50.7 
51.4 
53.9 
56.1 
53.0 



Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's 
Somerset 



53.8 

53.6 
51.3 
50.4 
53.2 



53.5 
53.1 
50.0 
49.0 
51.2 



53.4 
53.2 
50.5 
50.7 
53.9 



Talbot 
Washington 
Wicomico 
Worcester 



50.0 
53.9 
54.8 
50.1 



48.3 

53.7 
53.8 
50.7 



50.6 
55.1 
53.8 

52.2 



Source: State of Maryland, State Department of Assessments and Taxation, 
Seventh Biennial Report," p. 16. 



'Twenty- 



213- 



NO. 175 



REAL PROPERTY LEASED TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 

AND FEDERALLY OWNED REAL PROPERTY IN MARYLAND: 

1968, 1966 AND 1960 



ITEM 



1968 



1966 



.960 



Real Property Leased 
No. of leases 
Land (acres) 
No. of buildings 
Floor Area (sq.ft.) 
Annual Rental 



Ci) 



821 


782 


913 


2,882.9 


3,153.7 


2,659.3 


722 


684 


864 


4,639,540 


3,702,963 


1,662,051 


$14,174,661 


$11,253,314 


$3,658,173 



Federally Owned Real 

Property : 
Total Cost ($1,000) 
No. of installations 
Land (acres) 
No. of buildings 



$1,789,814 

305 

189,824.2 

12,187 



$1,644,631 

304 

187,081.7 

12,034 



$1,136,516 

227 

182,039.8 

12,702 



CD 



As of June 30 of the stated years 



Sources: General Services Administration, "Inventory Report of Real Property Leased 
to the United States throughout the World," as of June 30, for years 
reported. General Services Administration, "Inventory Report of Real 
Property Owned by the United States throughout the World," as of June 30, 
for years reported. 






•214- 



NO. 176 



MAJOR MILITARY INSTALLATIONS IN MARYLAND: 1969 



DEPARTMENT AND INSTALLATION 



SITE 



COUNTY OF SITE 



Department of the Army 

Aberdeen Proving Ground 

Fort Detrick 

Edgewood Arsenal 

Fort Holabird 

Fort George G. Meade 

Fort Ritchie 

Department of the Navy 

Naval Ship Research § Development 

Center, David W. Taylor Model Basin 

National Naval Medical Center 

Naval Academy 

Naval Air Test Center 

Naval Communication Station 

Naval Hospital 

Naval Ordnance Laboratory 

Naval Propellant Plant 

Naval Station 

Naval Training Center 

Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory 

Department of the Air Force 

Andrews Air Force Base 



Aberdeen 

Frederick 

Edgewood 

Dundalk 

Odenton 

Cascade 



Carderock 

Bethesda 

Annapolis 

Patuxent River 

Cheltenham 

Annapolis 

White Oak 

Indian Head 

Annapolis 

Bainbridge 

Annapolis 



Suit land 



Harford 

Frederick 

Harford 

Baltimore 

Anne Arundel 

Washington 



Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Anne Arundel 

St. Mary's 

Prince George's 

Anne Arundel 

Montgomery 

Charles 

Anne Arundel 

Cecil 

Anne Arundel 



Prince George's 



Source: Directorate for Information Operations, Office of Secretary of Defense, 
Washington (Pentagon), by report dated October 13, 1969. 



-215- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND 

While Maryland ranks among the states forty-second in area and eighteenth 
in population, it ranks ninth in total federal funds received. 

Of the nearly six billion dollars in 1968 outlays in Maryland, more than 
two billion dollars were in Baltimore County and more than one billion dollars in 
Montgomery County. 

From the myriad of federal programs, outlays in the retirement and social 
insurance programs were more than two billion dollars, and defense outlays were 
nearly $1.7 billion. It is thus seen that these many federal programs constitute 
a major impact on the Maryland economy. 



216- 



NO. 177 RELATIVE POSITION OF THE STATE: 1968 



18th in Population 
29th in Number of Poor 
9th in Total Federal Funds 
42nd in Area 



Rank in Terms of Funds Received from the Federal Agencies 

2nd For The Farm Credit Administration 

3rd For The Departmentof Health, Education and Welfare 

4th For The Federal Communications Commission 

5th For The Department of Commerce 

5th For The Civil Service Commission 

6th For The U. S. Information Agency 

7th For The National Aeronautics and Space Administration 

9th For The Department of State 
10th For The National Foundation on Arts and Humanities 
11th For The National Mediation Board 
12th For The General Services Administration 
13th For The Department of Housing and Urban Development 
14th For The Agency for International Development 
14th For The National Labor Relations Board 
15th For The Atomic Energy Commission 
19th For The Post Office Department 
20th For The National Science Foundation 
21st For The Railroad Retirement Board 
21st For The Veterans Administration 
22nd For The Peace Corps 

22nd For The Interstate Commerce Commission 
23rd For The Department of Labor 
24th For The Office of Emergency Planning 
25th For The Department of Transportation 
25th For The Department of Interior 
26th For The Treasury Department 
26th For The Small Business Administration 
29th For The Department of Justice 

30th For The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service 
30th For The Selective Service System 
34th For The Tennessee Valley Authority 
35th For The Federal Home Loam Bank Board 
36th For The Office of Economic Opportunity 
38th For The Department of Agriculture 

Sources: U. S. Bureau of The Census, Statistical Abstract of the United 
States: 1968 (89th edition). 

Federal Information Exchange System, "Federal Outlays in Maryland," 
1968. 



217- 



NO. 178 



FUNCTIONAL SUMMARY OF FEDERAL OUTLAYS, MARYLAND: 1968 



FUNCTION 



OUTLAY 



Total 



$ 5,933,954,645 



Retirement and Social Insurance 



CD 



Department of Defense - Military 

Health Services and Research 

Space Research and Technology 

Aids to Private Housing 

Advancement of Business 

Veterans Readjustment Benefits 

Postal Service 

Veterans Service-Connected Compensation 

Interest on the Public Debt 

Atomic Energy 

Public Assistance - Excluding Medical Care to the Aged 

General Property and Records Management 

Research and other Agricultural Services 

Urban Renewal and Community Facilities 

Economic and Financial Assistance 

Veterans Hospital and Medical Care 

Assistance for Elementary and Secondary Education 

Economic Opportunity Programs 

Water Transportation 

Other Welfare Services 

Labor and Manpower 

Other Veterans Benefits and Services 

Central Fiscal Operations 

Farm Income Stabilization 

Financing Farming and Rural Housing 

Public Housing Programs 

Land and Water Resources 

Assistance to Science Education and Basic Research 

Food for Freedom 

Area and Regional Development 

Assistance for Higher Education 

Fish and Wildlife Resources 

Financing Rural Electrification and Phones 

Other Aid to Education 

Agricultural Land and Water Resources 

Ground Transportation 

General Resources Survey and Administration 

Recreational Resources 

Central Personnel Management 

Air Transportation 

Interest on Refunds of Receipts 

Mineral Resources 

Protective Services and Alien Control 



2,065, 


304, 


954 


1,689, 


420, 


255 


845, 


279, 


043 


191, 


999, 


630 


157, 


416, 


494 


133 


900, 


626 


113, 


099, 


030 


93, 


134. 


042 


67 


301, 


147 


64 


461, 


381 


56 


384. 


412 


50 


215. 


013 


46 


728. 


838 


39 


931 


471 


35 


435 


331 


26 


096 


382 


24 


,170 


880 


23 


,548 


,934 


19 


,458 


,443 


19 


,095 


,303 


16 


,760 


,102 


15 


,132 


,651 


14 


,065 


,858 


11 


,558 


,777 


10 


,508 


,740 


9 


,146 


,857 


8 


,573 


,000 


8 


,108 


,251 


7 


,721 


,553 


7 


,096 


,943 


6 


,440 


,932 


6 


,072 


,056 


5 


,922 


,663 


5 


,614 


,000 


4 


,781 


,268 


4 


,710 


,849 


4 


,459 


,548 


4 


,151 


,851 


3 


,095 


,814 


2 


,904 


,128 


2 


,760 


,570 


2 


,752 


,411 


2 


,143 


,128 


1 


,393 


,268 



(continued on following page) 



•218- 



NO. 178 FUNCTIONAL SUMMARY OF FEDERAL OUTLAYS, MARYLAND: 1968 (Cont'd.) 



FUNCTION OUTLAY 

Foreign Information and Exchange Activities $ 1,368,345 

Conduct of Foreign Affairs 1,216,907 

Defense-Related Activities 925,126 

Other General Government 785,429 

Forest Resources 723,167 

Regulation of Business 508,284 

Executive Direction and Management 170,560 

Defense data include civilian and military payrolls. 
Source: Federal Information Exchange System, "Federal Outlays in Maryland, 1968." 



219- 



NO. 179 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



AGENCY 



ALLEGANY 



ANNE ARUNDEL 



BALTIMORE CITY 



Political Subdivision Total 



51,094,158 



377,378,044 



882,396,797 



Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense^-' 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Department of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Post Office Department 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
Agency for International 

Development 
Atomic Energy Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communication Commission 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics Space 

Administration 
National Federation on Arts and 

Humanity 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Mediation Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Office of Emergency Planning 
Peace Corps 

Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
Veterans Administration 



936,761 

37,735 
2,496,000 

18,860,092 

11,620,000 
229,139 

678,248 
1,934,134 

8,301 
1,837,620 

3,120,308 

2,770,247 



226,225 
218,028 





22,294 




2,000 




162,699 




65,669 


3 


,271,763 




18,760 




231,000 


2 


,347,135 



1,313,857 

57,351 

279,045,000 

24,593,567 

12,855,169 
5,640,143 

1,311,874 
3,961,174 
59,394 
2,498,578 
4,432,854 

18,583 

9,794,596 



18,111 
4,657,860 



4,477,043 

9 

195,095 

1,038,174 

26,658 

491,500 

1,418 

18,724 

17,469,348 



5,229,204 

655,143 

315,589,000 

285,906,827 

20,752,168 

904,757 

1,180,021 

14,138,738 

50,279,038 

573,130 

34,676,867 

33,319,351 

7,732,792 

10,756,119 

29,078,895 

97,536 

68,041 

26,594 

42,465 

15,211,409 

47,956 

1,634,716 

153,813 

569,869 

2,637 

3,188,189 

2,019,776 

1,969 

2,551 

8,638,021 

327,766 

3,869,493 

54,800 

341,306 

35,325,840 



-220- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: 1968 





BALTIMORE 


CALVERT 


CAROLINE 


CARROLL 


CECIL 


CHARLES 


1,415,133 


6,796,945 


7,831,446 


15,521,470 


69,957,754 


57,742,765 


), 211, 194 


1,198,838 


1,975,308 


1,257,801 


1,383,801 


2,770,623 


112,395 


25,496 


3,767 


57,946 


7,560 


6,837 


|5, 781, 000 


827,000 


463,000 


1,048,000 


43,555,000 


41,153,000 


P, 488, 813 


2,793,901 


2,627,295 


5,441,243 


3,357,700 


2,894,316 


V , 627, 470 


232,000 


31,000 


368,000 


649,000 


2,666,000 


389,013 


- - - 


125,086 


10,896 


251,223 


52 
171,677 


1 ,206,602 


47,953 


88,737 


102,582 


218,841 


1!, 111,500 


346,286 


532,098 


1,089,534 


962,844 


886,830 


1,315 


- - - 


_ _ _ 


105 


_ _ _ 


_ _ _ 


1, 511, 843 


27,317 


220,466 


49,821 


36,793 


451,628 


',360,950 


342,369 


414,847 


1,096,331 


1,063,616 


737,369 


',286,630 


416 


303 


462,536 


35,104 


_ _ _ 


4,000 


_ _ _ 


_ _ _ 


_ _ _ 


_ _ ._ 


_ _ _ 


,283,632 


554,050 


664,859 


1,883,768 


1,772,958 


1,218,909 



3,785 



,779,086 



2,975 



45,535 
9 



661,396 



159,479 



701,090 



13,280 



453,464 

253 

225 

,041,828 

54,894 

204,150 

15,208 

1,246 

,885,875 



9,120 
26,406 



52,412 
4,185 



306,221 



54,428 

4,948 

212,100 



367,233 



41,990 

26,682 

3,151 

387,047 

14,225 

141,000 

29,764 

1,227 

1,344,746 



33,586 

192 

407,206 

7,343 

138 

15,354,280 



382,636 



64,509 

4,186 

25,000 

7,526 
4,288,387 



(continued on following page) 



■221- 



NO. 179 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



AGENCY 



DORCHESTER 



FREDERICK 



GARRETT 



Political Subdivision Total 

Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense*- -* 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Department of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Post Office Department 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
Agency for International 

Development 
Atomic Energy Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communications 

Commission 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics Space 

Administration 
National Foundation on Arts and 

Humanity 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Mediation Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Office of Emergency Planning 
Peace Corps 

Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
Veterans Administration 



14,151,406 


48,925,726 


7,785,764 


1,281,906 


1,180,491 


781,839 


85,883 


11,076 


3,426 


4,875,000 


29,076,000 


132,000 


3,753,101 


5,585,877 


2,848,991 


210,000 


467,000 


22,000 


130,562 


235,643 


30,840 


304,715 


284,501 


40,449 


751,694 


1,697,646 


481,422 


1,010 


13,000 


- - - 


248,276 


1,626,515 


1,539,647 


616,172 


1,570,234 


410,852 


_ _ _ 


6,325 


236 


_ _ _ 


8,300 


- - - 


997,289 


2,548,628 


664,859 



2,535 



129,815 



60,476 

13,329 

39,150 

1,517 

648,876 



134,925 
213,704 



81,000 
208,193 



1,259,921 

19,349 

408,750 

47,656 
2,240,992 



1,813 

1,595 



191,113 



183,443 

4,616 

49,500 



397 



,123 



•222- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: 1968 (Cont'd.) 



HARFORD 


HOWARD 




KENT 


MONTGOMERY 


PRINCE GEORGE' 


[79,157,146 


38,795,586 


10 


,104,250 


1,118,334,289 


659,387,066 


773,792 


389,684 


1 


,921,131 


2,003,326 


43,885,188 


17,117 


6,897 




1,023 


79,223,631 


44,268,384 


.60,312,000 


5,196,000 


2 


,736,000 


369,651,000 


196,047,000 


4,003,477 


2,531,112 


3 


,378,119 


446,351,306 


34,942,106 


1,294,000 


1,332,000 




52,000 


43,258,571 


71,639,186 


118,759 


108,861 




58,946 


3,959,437 


7,919,159 


_ _ _ 


_ _ _ 




108 


_ _ _ 


128,070 


398,558 


115,861 




55,481 


1,082,114 


1,037,218 


1,697,646 


802,370 




447,638 


9,856,482 


8,598,028 


458 


_ _ _ 




_ _ _ 


371,180 


353,321 


73,862 


22,883,655 




9,156 


4,154,202 


13,410,502 


1,620,616 


755,517 




308,410 


7,433,020 


7,540,188 


46,416 


9,674 




_ _ _ 


1,015,736 


76,141 


- - - 


_ _ _ 




_ _ _ 


42,305,743 


3,301,635 


2,881,057 


1,440,529 




554,050 


36,861,766 


31,638,862 


- - - 


- - - 




- - - 


351,603 


134,189 



353,402 



13,785 



56,707 



59,142 
181,597 



89,661 12,888,763 10,255,132 

- - - 49 - - - 



1,500 



16,136,483 117,477,039 
1,090 97,337 



144,370 



427,364 

14,412 

150,000 

219,200 
3,907,345 



40,326 
231,267 



280,206 

6,681 

231,250 

6,317 
1,833,238 



90,000 



91 

28,222 

3,597 

105,000 



264,087 



143,200 

1,836,142 

129,294 

71,905 

1,128,889 

53,666 

886,050 

4,821 

446,003 

36,715,039 



4,120,348 

1,314,055 

1,681 

134,722 

1,354,668 

57,825 

712,600 

4,143 

183,858 

58,754,644 



(continued on following page) 



■223- 



NO. 179 



POLITICAL SUBDIVISION SUMMARY OF 



AGENCY 



QUEEN ANNE'S 



ST. MARY'S 



SOMERSET 



Political Subdivision Total 

Department of Agriculture 
Department of Commerce 
Department of Defense ^1) 
Department of Health, Education 

and Welfare 
Department of Housing and Urban 

Development 
Department of the Interior 
Department of Justice 
Department of Labor 
Post Office Department 
Department of State 
Department of Transportation 
Treasury Department 
Agency for International 

Development 
Atomic Energy Commission 
Civil Service Commission 
Farm Credit Administration 
Federal Communications Commission 
Federal Home Loan Bank Board 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation 

Service 
General Services Administration 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
National Aeronautics Space 

Administration 
National Foundation on Arts and 

Humanity 
National Labor Relations Board 
National Mediation Board 
National Science Foundation 
Office of Economic Opportunity 
Office of Emergency Planning 
Peace Corps 

Railroad Retirement Board 
Selective Service System 
Small Business Administration 
Tennessee Valley Authority 
U. S. Information Agency 
Veterans Administration 



5,315,578 


62 


,485,808 


8,373,846 


1,119,626 


2 


,972,229 


777,996 


4,790 




7,534 


3,767 


408,000 


43 


,782,000 


440,000 


1,732,462 


4 


,224,677 


4,350,539 


72,000 


2 


,057,000 


36,000 


113,953 




4,110 


52,800 


26,735 




132,888 


320,344 


396,962 




802,370 


489,868 


21,087 




163,961 


168,332 


342,167 




824,094 


410,407 


288 




- - - 


- - - 


554,050 


1 


,329,719 


664,859 



5,659 



92,925 
76,604 



4,483,181 



348,270 



99,563 



24,190 

6,681 

25,000 

265 
1,546,346 



1,340 



5,380 
144,769 



102,810 

4,197 

40,000 



360,438 



(1) Department of Defense data include civilian and military payrolls 

Source: Federal Information Exchange Service. "Federal Outlays in Maryland, 1968." 



■224- 



FEDERAL OUTLAYS BY AGENCY: 1968 (Cont'd.) 



TALBOT WASHINGTON WICOMICO WORCESTER 



1,123,964 


86,158,738 


794,449 


2,137,768 


4,449 


28,686 


1,784,000 


52,139,000 


4,754,309 


15,137,054 


423,000 


635,320 


445,007 


419,707 


95,429 


167,379 


853,046 


2,069,270 


7,900 


662 


67,598 


1,735,024 


516,863 


1,998,238 


15 


836,039 


- - - 


8,615 


775,669 


3,213,487 



23,630,839 


10 


,090,127 


1,502,086 


1 


,302,916 


93,656 




4,449 


1,234,000 




474,000 


9,766,502 


4 


,481,593 


3,019,347 




80,000 


39,485 




540,435 


237,101 




109,670 


1,452,712 




633,450 


319,537 




115,995 


1,177,408 




513,522 


10 




- - - 


1,662,148 




775,669 



20,372 505,403 29,333 6,649 
- - - 23,447 

27 



7,831 101,761 146,018 268,487 



76,604 1,975,556 374,952 104,826 

3,777 17,070 6,681 4,797 

14,000 10,000 578,256 207,800 

- - - 4,478 - - - - - - 

- - - 8 402 - - - 
479,646 3,018,213 1,967,731 465,869 



-225- 



X 




U 




< 




-J 




< 




a, 




a, 




< 




»\ 




CO 




pj 




H 




< 




H 




co 




Q 




PJ 




H 




HH 




2 




ZD 




„ 




CO 




PJ 


/ V 


1 — 1 


1—1 


OS 


* ' 


o 


00 


u 


v£> 


PJ 


cn 


E- 


1—1 


< 




u 




-J 


OS 


< 


< 


2 


PJ 


o 


>H 


1— I 




H 


hJ 


u 


< 


2 


u 


3 


CO 


U-, 


1— 1 




Ph 


Q 




PJ 




H 


Q 


U 
PJ 


^ 


hJ 


►J 


PJ 


>- 


co 


OS 




< 


as 


s 


o 




PU 


PL, 




o 


co 




pj 


2 


OS 


o 


3 


M 


H 


H 


i— i 


OS 


a 


O 


2 


Oh 


pj 




a. 


2 


X 


< 


pj 


i— i 




X 


-j 


CJ 


< 


< 


os 


_J 


pj 


< 


a 


D, 


pj 


O- 


u. 


< 



o 

00 



o 

2 



PL. 

o 



E 


o 


U 


« 


< 


t^ 


-J 


■st 


< 


to 


o. 


■t 


o- 


00 


< 


1— 1 



o 
o 



CM 
(N 



00 




w 


o 


H 


o 


< 


o 


H 


•< 


CO 


cn 




LO 


Q 


00 


LU 




<- 


r^ 


h— H 


cn 



■— i r^ 


r^ r^ 


cn to 


o to 


■* • 


CO • 


-. to 


■> LO 


i—l CT> 


"* vO 


tO LO 


LO CM 



cn o> 



•«t 


00 


r- "* 


vo r*> 


to CTl 


o o 


r» o 


o 


CO cn 


"tf o 


to r-» 


00 LO 


LO -Tt 


r- ■* 


• 


1—1 


It • 


00 • 


vO • 


00 • 


(Nl 




CM 


•> 1—1 


to 


1 r^ 


*v \Q 


1 LO 






(N i—l 




i—i 


LO CM 


(Nl LO 



^f 00 

o to 

00 • 

" 1—1 
LO CM 

\0 LO 

LO 

cn 



<d- h- r-- r-^ to 

H v£) to to 00 

<— I Cn CT> • 

"00 •> •» (Nl 

r— - i — i oo oo (ni 

t~- I— I i—l I— I 

(Nl 



tO LO 

LO VO 

00 • 

•« r- 

to i—l 

(Nl 

to 



vO cn 

\£> LO 

00 • 

« Cn 

(Nl (Nl 

LO 



<tf to 

O LO 

to • 

tO i— I 

o 
to 



cn CM 
r-- oo 
o • 
•> to 
r^ cm 
to 



cn (ni 
LO oo 

CM 
•> LO 

O i-H 

cn 

CM 



tO i— t 

LO 

p, to 

■rf CM 

CM 

<* 




DO 
03 
Ph 

DO 

c 

•H 

o 



o 

4-1 

c 
o 

•3 


3 
C 

•H 
+-> 

c 
o 
o 



to -* 

tO .-I 

cn • 

- i—i 

cn cm 

vJD 00 

*t 

CM 



O ^r 


tO tO CM 


tO CM 


00 to 


<* CM 


\0 CO 


vO to 


vO CO 


o o 


o o ^ 


CM I\ 


cn ^ 


oo cn 


i—l CM 


LO *3- 


cn cm 


cn • 


■«* ^r • 


i—l 


LO • 


i—i • 


LO • 


O • 


LO • 


« o 


n ., fT) 


•> i—l 


« r- 


•> to 


•> CM 


■> 00 


•> O 


i—l (Nl 


*t ^r 1-1 


00 CM 


** ■<* 


LO i—l 


vD to 


r- 


t>> LO 


CM tO 


LO LO 


cn 


00 


LO 


oo 


vO 


^r 


to 


vO vD 


CM 


to 


r^ 


to 


vO 


cn 



to 



cn 



\D 



&> 
































t/i 











































































■M 






































u 


















c 














al 
























u 

































DO 
























3 


















E 














c 
























o 


















Ph 














•H 
























w 


















O 














Ph 











































i—i 






DO 








3 
























OS 

























c 








O 










































> 






•H 








Jh 
























1—1 

























CO 








CJ 



















DO 






03 


















a 






3 
O 








. — 1 






+-> 












o 






S3 


















i—i 






■x. 








rt 






03 












1—1 






■M 


















03 














c 






i— i 












o 






i—l 


















C 






uD- 








o 






a> 












c 






3 


















o 














•H 






OS 












J= 






o 


















•H 






4-» 








+-> 


















u 






•H 


















DO 






c 








o 






<u 












(U 






fn 


































c 






10 












H 






DO 


















os 






e 








3 






c 


















< 






CO 


















Ph 








u- 


















US" 






13 








L> 












UL7 






o 

i—i 








-o 






0) 












X 






P 






u 






c 






Oj 















<u 






a 






X 






o 






03 






3 






o 













> 






c 


■M 




aj 






03 


DO 




oj 


h 




oJ 






o3 


o 




03 


•H 




o3 


u 




03 







oS 


o 


o 




+-> 


-a 




+-> 


U 




-t-J 


oj 




+-> 







•M 


to 




+-> 


•M 




■M 


< 




•M 


a 




+-> 


•H 


<u 




•H 


c 




•H 


(D 




• H 


a) 




■H 


fn 




•H 







■H 


Oj 




•H 






•H 






•H 


4-> 


1 — 1 




Ph 


03 




Ph 


c 




Ph 


to 




P^ 


3 




Ph 


OS 




PU 


•M 




Ph 


" 




Ph 


X 




Ph 


aJ 


a> 




03 






03 


PJ 




OS 


a) 




03 


•M 




03 






03 


f-l 




o3 


co 




rt 


+-> 




a! 


^-i 


CO 


^H 


U 


a> 


i — i 


u 




r— 1 


U 


OS 


1 — 1 


U 


i—l 


i — 1 


u 


1—1 


i — i 


CJ 


O 


i — i 


C_J 


CO 


- — i 


U 


•H 


1 — 1 


U 


3 




OS 




t/> 


03 




O 


03 






03 




3 


a 




OJ 


03 




Ph 


rf 







oS 




C 


aS 




Ph 


i—i 


4-J 


fH 


C 


+J 


h 


•H 


fj 


u 


a) 


•M 


fH 


o 


■M 


u 


>H 


*J 


!1 


(/> 


fJ 


(H 


c 


■P 


5h 


3 


4^ 


fn 


O 


a3 


O 


<D 


(D 


O 


<u 


e 


o 


<D 


o 


o 


a> 


•H 


O 





3 


O 





c 


C 





•H 


o 





E 


o 





Du- 


O 


H 


D, 


a 


[- 


CL, 


o 

< 


H 


On 


03 

Ph 

CO 


E- 


Dh 


DO 
< 


H 


Oh 


+-) 
oj 
2 


[- 


Dh 


03 


H 


Oh 


CO 

3 


E-| 


D- 


E 
O 

u 


H 


D- 



•226- 



u 

< 

< 

< 



O 

2 

O 

►— 1 

E- 
oi 

a 



u 

< 

< 
a, 
a, 
< 



CO 

E- 
< 
E- 

CO 

a 

UJ 
E- 
i— i 
Z 

3 



CO 

13 



a- 
o 

CJ 

J 
< 

o 

I— I 
E- 
U 

z 



f CTi 


r- lo 


LO 00 


O <* 


^J- 00 


LO 00 


r^ oi 


CM O 


O O 


CT> i— 1 


"3- ■>* 


i— 1 CM 


o ct> 


r-H r-~ 


CM o 


vO O 


O • 


\o • 


LO 


LO • 


i—i • 


\D • 


.— i . 


r-- • 


- r- 


tO 


•> t— 1 


•> o 


i rr 


CM 


« LO 


n vO 


\0 CM 




CM t— I 


LO vO 
to i—l 


i— i 




i— 1 


LO CM 



to to 


LO CM 


tO ^D 


LO O 


<* LO 


tO LO 


00 o 


^ 1-1 


vD O 


r^ Tf 


to "3- 


LO ■— 1 


.-1 ^f 


O CM 


o r- 


O CT> 


^D ■ 


r-~ 


o • 


to • 


to • 


r-~ • 


r- • 


to • 


•* \Q 


* ^ 


•« cr> 


- ^r 


•N \Q 


•> a> 


•» 00 


* LO 


r~- cm 


CM 


t"N ^H 


o to 


oo 


a> 


CT> 


CM Tt 


t-« 


VO 


LO 


vO i—l 


1—1 


v£5 


LO 


^ 


Tf 




to 


^r 


r-H 


1—1 


1—1 


00 



CM 



■&e- 



r-- oo 


LO 


O 


vO 


to 


i—l to 


O 


r^ 


CM 


to 


*fr 


00 


CM CM 


to o 


^D 


to 


<* 


o 


LO i—l 


a> 


00 


r-H 


v© 


00 


00 


r-- r-- 


to • 


to 


. 


LO 


• 


o • 


CT> 


• 


r-^ 


• 


^r 


• 


o • 


" LO 


*> 


\D 


* 


o» 


•> CM 


•* 


■<* 


•* 


00 


•\ 


r^ 


« a> 


CT> ** 


vO 




■<* 


^H 


H ^t 


CM 




©> 




vO 


CM 


r~- lo 


i—l 


<* 




v£5 




CM i—l 


\D 




o 




i—t 




i—i 


Ol 


CM 




r-- 




■— 1 


O) 




r^ 




LO 




00 


•s 


•* 




•\ 




•\ 






* 




•* 




•N 


00 


i— I 




to 




00 
CM 






■—I 




LO 




1—1 
1—1 



V) 



JS 


















rt 












g 












o 






o 






10 












^ 












c^ 












•H 






U 






E 












3 












^ 












> 






rt 






rt 












VI 












M 












H 






<L> 






U 












C 












O 












<L> 






t/> 






W> 












i—i 












5h 












CO 






<D 






o 
























a. 


















o. 






Oh 












i—i 
rt 






o 






X 












H3 






13 


















•H 






•H 






+-> 












rt 






c 






5h 












O 






> 






•H 


















rt 






0) 








CJ 






o 

C75 






^-1 








3 


















t/> 






o 






C 












CO 






+-> 












•H 






a> 






a. 






d 






13 












Jh 












<+H 






o 






e 






+-> 






c 






a> 






o 












<U 






•H 




rt 


rt 




rt 


10 




rt 


rt 




rt 


fn 




^ 


Cl, 




rt 






rt 


c 




rt 


> 




•t-> 


S 




4-> 


•H 




■M 






4-> 


d 




4-> 


CX 




■M 






■M 


<u 




+-| 


fn 




•H 






•H 


10 




•H 


■M 




■H 


4-1 




•H 


o 




•H 






•H 


CO 




•H 


d) 




a, 


T3 




P-, 


<S> 




Ph 


C 




PL, 


i—i 




a. 






P-. 


c 




a, 






Ph 


co 




rt 


C 




rt 


< 




rt 


a> 




<$ 


0) 




rt 


u 




d 


o 




rt 


w 




rt 




i — i 


u 


a 


i — ( 


U 




i—i 


u 


E 


i—l 


U 


s 


I— I 


u 


•H 


1 — 1 


U 


•H 


i — i 


u 


C 


i — i 


U 


-C 


rt 






rt 




O 


rt 




0) 


rt 






a 




E 


rt 




4-> 


<M 




^i 


•^ 




•M 


+j 


fH 


u 


«J 


(H 


•H 


♦J 


h 


fc 


♦J 


h 


^H 


4-J 


u 


o 


4J 


h 


ui 


+-> 


Fh 


U 


+J 


5-. 


i— ( 





<D 


o 


o 


CD 


i—l 


o 


0) 


•H 








(U 


O 


a> 


c 


O 


(U 


o 


O 


<D 


<D 


O 


<L> 


rt 


E- 


o. 


X) 


E- 


D. 


X 


H 


Oh 


■M 


:- 


Cu 


X 


E- 


a. 


o 


E- 


D- 


3 


E- 


a, 


+-> 


H 


a, 


a> 






rt 






3 






<D 






■M 






o 






T3 






(L) 






■jz 






J 






Cl, 






CC 






o 






PJ 






PJ 






> 







vO 

en 



e 

0) 

+-> 

Ph 

co 



Ph 



X3 

e 

3 
Z 



to 





<u 




g 




3 




i—i 




o 


• 


> 


•w- 




c 


"., 


•H 


a 




•H 


a> 


X 


?H 


CJ 


rt 


<a 




i—i 


rt 


rt 


4-> 


Ph 


•H 


Ph 


Ph 


< 


rt 


~ 


u 






•* 


>H 


c 


<u 


O 


Oh 


•H 




I/) 


. *\ 


10 


o 


•H 


o 


E 


o 


£ 


•> 


o 


i-H 


u 


V3- 






1 — 1 


c 


ui 


•H 


c 




o 


<D 


•H 


^H 


bO 


rt 


<ll 




ac 


w 




0) 


C 


5-i 


a 


P 


•H 


+-> 


X 


•H 


O 


13 


rt 


c 


i— i 


<D 


<^i 


Ph 


Ph 


X 


Ph 


w 


< 


1—1 




rt 




•M 


o 


O 


o 


H 


u 


•> 


3 


H 


o 




co 



•227- 



NO. 181 FEDERAL OUTLAYS IN MARYLAND, BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISION: 1968 



Maryland Total 
Baltimore City- 
Baltimore 
Montgomery 
Prince George's 
Anne Arundel 
Harford 

Washington 

Cecil 

St. Mary's 

Charles 

Allegany 

Frederick 

Howard 

Wicomico 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Kent 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Caroline 

Garrett 
Calvert 
Queen Anne's 



5,933 


954, 


882 


,396, 


2,181 


,415, 


1,118 


,334, 


659 


,387, 


377 


,378, 


179 


,157, 


86 


,158, 


69 


,957, 


62 


,485, 


57 


,742, 


51 


,094, 


48 


,925, 


38 


,795, 


23 


,630, 


15 


,521, 


14 


,151, 


11 


,123, 


10 


,104, 


10 


,090, 


8 


,373, 


7 


,831, 


7 


,785, 


6 


,796, 


5 


,315, 



645 
797 

133 

289 
066 
044 
146 



738 
754 
808 
765 
158 

726 
586 
839 
470 
406 

964 

250 
127 
846 
446 

764 
945 

578 



Source: Federal Information Exchange System, "Federal Outlays in Maryland, 
1968." 



GENERAL BOOKBINDING CO. 



Ft' 



QUALITY CONTROL M»«K 



228- 



3 1M3D Q2flMfl315 b 



a3iJj.VJa?A^piJ56b